Dining

Ackee, No Saltfish

by Markeshia Ricks | Jan 27, 2017 12:08 pm | Comments (5)

Markeshia Ricks Photo Inside New Haven’s newest Caribbean restaurant, Qulen Wright sautéd the brightly red and yellow peppers, onions and garlic to create the base for Jamaica’s national dish, ackee and saltfish — except there would be no saltfish.

“I’m the vegan cook,” Wright said. “So I can make it without the fish.”

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Fish Market Keeps Christmas Eve Tradition Alive

by Brian Slattery | Dec 23, 2016 12:10 pm | Comments (4)

Brian Slattery Photo On Friday morning, cars lined State Street all around the #1 Fish Market. Cars were parked on side streets, and people hustled across the state thoroughfare with grocery bags full of seafood. The market’s own small parking lot was completely full. A line snaked out the door and stretched across the entire front of the building. Some people would be there for hours. But everyone was in a good mood.

They were part of an annual ritual that has been going on for years. The #1 Fish Market —  which many consider the best in the New Haven area  —  becomes the epicenter not only for anyone who wants seafood for their holiday meal, but also specifically for the Italian-American tradition of the Feast of the Seven Fishes, which stipulates that a family serve an enormous meal of, you guessed it, seven fishes on Christmas Eve.

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Today On WNHH Radio

by Lucy Gellman | Dec 23, 2016 7:30 am

Lucy Gellman Photo Friday’s programs on WNHH radio go full steam ahead into the end of 2016, exploring last-minute local shopping, recapping a crazy year of news, and looking at how New Haveners get their holiday season on. 

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Students, Refugees Cook Up Acceptance

by Lucy Gellman | Dec 22, 2016 12:17 pm | Comments (1)

Lucy Gellman Photo Standing before a hot plate and sacks of sugar, semolina flour, and ground nuts, A (who asked not to be identified by her name) prepared to perform culinary magic. Her hands flew through the still air, 30 pairs of eyes following her every move. The swift flick of her wrist. A spoon stirring slowly through simple syrup.

As she spoke, a fast thread of Arabic running from her to the audience, translator Malak Nasr stepped forward to distill her sentences. Two cups of sugar. Four cups of coarse semolina.

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