Twitterers Chase Cheese Truck

Thomas MacMIllan Photo The word went out on Twitter: Look for the truck on College Street. Jessica Van Deren got the message—and set out in search of a tasty rainy-day lunch.

Van Deren (at left in photo), who works in admissions at Albertus Magnus College, showed up at the Caseus Cheese Truck at 11:30 a.m. Huddled under an umbrella with two co-workers on the College Street sidewalk, she ordered a Combo #1: grilled cheese and a tomato soup.

The Cheese Truck, a project of Caseus restaurant, debuted last week. It has already caught on, with some new-media help.

With a fully outfitted kitchen on wheels, the Whitney Avenue bistro is using social media tools like Twitter to attract customers to the roving lunch spot.

The Cheese Truck follows in the footsteps of the Cupcake Truck, which also tweets its location each day and has attracted a loyal following.

The Cheese Truck menu lives up to Caseus’ reputation for offering gourmet takes on traditional dishes. For instance, the Cheese Trucks “Classic” grilled cheese—the menu’s centerpiece—features more than just cheddar or jack. It boasts of “a blend of provolone, swiss, comte, gruyere, gouda, sharp cheddar, and more.”

The tomato soup is made with local heirloom tomatoes. “They give it that extra pop,” said chef Jeff Weaver (at right in top photo). Plus there’s plenty of cream, he added.

As Tom Sobicinski handed out grilled sandwiches on Wednesday, he offered another gourmet twist. “Would you like some cornichons on the side?”

Sure, I’ll take some little pickles, customers replied.

Tom Sobocinski (pictured) is the brother of Caseus owner Jason Sobocinski. It took six months of off-and-on online hunting before Tom found the vehicle that has become the Cheese Truck. He picked it up for $14,000 using Craigslist in New Jersey. Inside, the little truck is outfitted with everything you’d find in a professional kitchen, except an oven.

During the lunch rush on Wednesday, Chef Jeff worked the grill in the stern while Tom Sobocinski took orders from the customers queued in the rain.

As she waited for her order, Van Deren said she had checked online to find the location of the Cheese Truck that day. “It’s like the cupcake truck,” she said. You never know where the food will be served up next. “It’s like a fun outing.”

Van Deren said she hadn’t eaten at the Cheese Truck before, but she’s a fan of Caseus. “I expect it to be delicious,” she said.

As he took orders at the window, Sobocinski shouted them to Weaver, standing just a couple feet away in the little truck.

“Do you have to yell? He’s right next to you,” said Paul Goerhke after placing his order.

Sobocinski assured him that yelling is an important part of the process.

Goerhke (at left in photo) said that he and his dining companion Jessica Svendson are regulars at Caseus, which is near their apartment. The feature that keeps them coming back is “How much they care.” The care is evident in the selection of choice ingredients and in the friendly atmosphere Jason and Tom create at Caseus.

Tom Sobicinski said he and his brother intend for a meal at Caseus to feel like eating in their dining room. “One of the tables is in fact our own dining room table,” he said.

Out in the rain, the line at the Cheese Truck kept growing. As she waited for her order, Amy Dowe (under the red umbrella) said she was drawn to the truck because she likes Caseus restaurant and because grilled cheese is something different from the Thai and Mexican food carts that set up around Yale.

“And the soup is amazing!” whispered another woman in line.

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Comments

posted by: R on February 26, 2010  11:35am

I am so excited - this is great, BUT…
A problem w/ the Cupcake Truck is its unreliability. Yes, it’s kind of fun to check online to see where it will be, but not as fun as, say, knowing it will always be at such-and-such a place at an exact time on a given day, and actually get your cupcakes w/o having to wait up to an hour, because the truck is late. This happens frequently. As a customer, just a suggestion for Caseus to learn from the Cupcake Truck’s mistakes - don’t be late and make people wait! And if one day a week, you can be counted on to be somewhere we don’t have to check online about, that would also be great. I can’t wait to try it out. Caseus makes great food.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 26, 2010  11:45am

The real deal on Cheese.Thank God for the Edge Of The Wood’s and Elaines kicthen.

Dangerous Dairy
by Djehuty Ma’at-Ra


What Are Dairy Products?


Dairy products include, but are not limited to: milk, cheese, butter, ghee, sour cream, yogurt, ice cream, cream, kefir, and colostrums.

Various Kinds of Dairy Products

CHEESE

This stuff is fermented and congealed milk and highly toxic. It is made with the enzymes from baby male cows that have their stomachs ripped open for the enzymes in their intestines. This is what you big cheese lovers are eating. The holes in Swiss cheese are the result of living microorganisms. Little critters eat little holes into the cheese, and then the dairy industry sells it to you.

Personally, cheese smells like doo doo (poop) to me. I dislike walking near the cheese section in Whole Foods Market, especially the one in Berkeley, California. That crap smells horrible. I can’t believe I ever used to eat this crap. But I did when I was deaf, dumb, and blind (unconscious).

Cheese contains casein (milk-based protein), is mucus forming, and contains fecal mater (like milk) and bacteria. All cheese in the United States is dead which is why it is refrigerated. The refrigerator is a morgue. The cheese package plastic case is the body bag. In Europe, cheese is alive like your dog or cat. You wouldn’t put your pet in the refrigerator because it is alive. Therefore, Europeans don’t freeze their cheese. They leave it out of the morgue (refrigerator).

Cheese, like most other dairy products is very constipating and mucus forming!

http://dherbs.com/articles/dangerous-dairy-238.html

posted by: Wallace on February 26, 2010  12:49pm

So threefifths, the dead cheese is the safe cheese? Or, what, European cheese-eaters are cannibals? I subscribe to the position that live cheese is really the only kind worth eating. If it doesn’t walk off the plate and into your mouth, why bother?

In any case, Gromit and I are looking forward to checking out the Cheese Truck!

posted by: streever on February 26, 2010  1:50pm

oh god 3/5ths

I think you need a good science lesson.
“This stuff is fermented and congealed milk and highly toxic.”
Toxicity is a measure of a substances ability to injure organisms: to date, cheese has not been shown to consistently damage life, and as such, is most definitely not “toxic” by any scientific or medical definition.

“The holes in Swiss cheese are the result of living microorganisms. Little critters eat little holes into the cheese, and then the dairy industry sells it to you.”

Your knowledge of bacteria is astounding. Your body is full of “little critters”. Micro-organisms are bountiful and helpful. Yes, some are bad for you, but your body is home to literally thousands of different TYPES of bacteria—millions upon millions of “little critters” live in you.

There are bacteria on EVERY piece of food you eat and in EVERY breath of air you take. Every drop of water & every bit of dust that enters your nose.

What do you have against cheese anyway? Do you honestly never consume any?

posted by: NormalCheeseEater on February 26, 2010  1:52pm

Wow 3/5th…just wow.  Dead cheese it is!

Back to Caseus and the cheese truck….I’ve had it twice and been pleased!! I love spreading the word by Twitter..it really works.  Keep up the good work and I LOVE that you guys scream “back” into the kitchen for each order like you’re in a 2000 foot kitchen…..it’s classic. 

Thanks for bringing the great food of Caseus to all us lunchers who can’t get over to Whitney/Trumbull to enjoy your creations!  I hope Mac&Cheese; will be a special soon!

posted by: angelo on February 26, 2010  2:24pm

A bumper sticker for Threefifths -

Real school boards don’t eat cheese!!!

posted by: Alphonse Credenza on February 26, 2010  3:09pm

Fascinating.  A sandwich that can boast.

“NEW: BOASTABLES!”

posted by: streever on February 26, 2010  3:35pm

3/5ths I am so bothered by your comment because I frequently think you have a good intention but sometimes facts that just confound me—things that can’t be proven with knowledge that anyone currently has but theoretical assumptions.

In this case though you are advancing a bizarre and anti-scientific argument which is proposed by an individual trying to sell an “herbal supplement” containing some elements which actually DO pose a risk to one’s health in great quantities.

Man, I know you’re smarter than this! Do some research and look into what he’s pedaling and what is in it.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 26, 2010  3:38pm

angelo
A bumper sticker for Threefifths -

Real school boards don’t eat cheese!!!

I like that.


streever
oh god 3/5ths

I think you need a good science lesson.
“This stuff is fermented and congealed milk and highly toxic.”
Toxicity is a measure of a substances ability to injure organisms: to date, cheese has not been shown to consistently damage life, and as such, is most definitely not “toxic” by any scientific or medical definition.

“The holes in Swiss cheese are the result of living microorganisms. Little critters eat little holes into the cheese, and then the dairy industry sells it to you.”

Your knowledge of bacteria is astounding. Your body is full of “little critters”. Micro-organisms are bountiful and helpful. Yes, some are bad for you, but your body is home to literally thousands of different TYPES of bacteria—millions upon millions of “little critters” live in you.

There are bacteria on EVERY piece of food you eat and in EVERY breath of air you take. Every drop of water & every bit of dust that enters your nose.

What do you have against cheese anyway? Do you honestly never consume any?

I eat no Dairy Products. But for all of you who do Check out the Casu Marzu cheese.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=En_CFeEztbQ&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNHL7rWhbLQ&feature=related

posted by: selam on February 26, 2010  4:02pm

Yay for Caseus…

OMG threefifths….you’re like the Nietzsche of cheese with your “cheese is dead” philosophy. It’s just cheese. Relax! :)

posted by: matthew j feiner on February 26, 2010  4:32pm

nice write up!!

this is one more reason why i love caseus !!

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 26, 2010  4:35pm

streever

3/5ths I am so bothered by your comment because I frequently think you have a good intention but sometimes facts that just confound me—things that can’t be proven with knowledge that anyone currently has but theoretical assumptions.

In this case though you are advancing a bizarre and anti-scientific argument which is proposed by an individual trying to sell an “herbal supplement” containing some elements which actually DO pose a risk to one’s health in great quantities.

Man, I know you’re smarter than this! Do some research and look into what he’s pedaling and what is in it.

But how can you say that scientific or medical definition is right. Can you prove what he said to be wrong.  I already did the Cheese on Dairy and I don’t use it.


Red Meat and Dairy Take Toll on Immune System
By Shelley DuBois | Posted December 9, 2008
Posted in: Health Blog
Is it true that warm milk can make me sleepy?
Nestled in two trapezoids on the second tier of the food pyramid, dairy and red meat are often lauded as sources of calcium and protein but linked to cancer and high fat diets. New research from scientists at the University of California, San Diego provides more evidence for the cancer-causing properties of these foods.

The study suggests that red meat and dairy products contain a molecule that humans don’t naturally produce called Neu5Gc. Human cells absorb this compound, and over time the body produces antibodies against it. After years of ingesting milk and meat, constant antibody production may trigger a mild, but continuous inflammatory immune response. This kind of chronic inflammation has long been linked to cancer.

But questions remain. Each person responds differently to the compound, says molecular biologist Ajit Varki who helped design the study. His upcoming work will examine how genetic and environmental factors could affect the way our bodies handle the molecule.

As for his own diet, he’s playing it safe. “I am not a vegetarian,” he wrote in an e-mail. “But I don’t need to be to avoid Neu5Gc.” He added that chicken, eggs, and poultry are free of the molecule. “I just avoid lamb, pork, beef and milk,” he said.

Red meat, cow’s milk and low-fiber diets increase risk of lymphatic cancer, says new research

New research published in the American Journal of Epidemiology shows that diets high in animal protein (red meat), saturated fat, eggs and dairy products (cow’s milk) leads to an increased risk of lymphatic cancer (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma or NHL). Simultaneously, the study concluded that diets high in plant fiber—from broccoli, lettuce, tomatoes and other vegetables—resulted in a 40% decrease in the risk of lymphatic cancer. It’s an interesting study, but here’s the real story:

This study brings new scientific support to some of the dietary suggestions I’ve been sharing with readers for quite some time. Namely, red meat is bad for you, cow’s milk and dairy products are bad for you, saturated animal fat is bad for you, and vegetables and dietary fiber and good for you. I realize that’s an oversimplification of the research, but it’s also a valid summary of it.

Red meat and cow’s milk are unhealthy for human consumption for several reasons, most notably because cows are raised in an extremely unhealthy environment by the ranching industry. They’re pumped full of illegal hormones, they are actually fed chicken litter and ground up diseased animals as part of their daily meals, and they are raised on feed that’s typically laced with heavy metals (cadmium and lead) as well as pesticide residues. When you eat beef, you’re eating all this, second-hand style. The cow ate it first, stored it in its tissues, and then you ate it. Many of these chemicals, by the way, tend to concentrate in animal fat tissues, so the juicier your hamburger, the more toxic substances it’s likely to contain.

On the dairy side, cow’s milk and other dairy products and bad for humans for a much simpler reason: cow’s milk is food for baby cows, not for adult human beings. The substance is simply nutritionally imbalanced for humans. It lacks gamma-linolenic acid, it doesn’t have much magnesium, and it is very high in difficult-to-digest proteins, among other problems. Baby cows do very well with it, but human beings don’t.

This study is simply highlighting the results of consuming these unhealthy animal products on a regular basis. And you can bet that lymphatic cancer is just the tip of the iceberg here: the same foods probably also contribute to colon cancer, nerve disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. It all adds up to yet one more reason to consider avoiding red meat entirely. Even if you don’t go vegetarian, you can replace all your red meat with chicken or turkey (that’s what I do when I feel the need to eat meat). Or, at the very least, greatly limit your consumption of red meat. For dairy products, I highly recommend you try the 30-day “no dairy diet,” meaning that you avoid all dairy products for 30 days and see how you feel. Most people notice a tremendous difference in their energy, their digestion, and they typically see a strong improvement in sinus conditions or asthma. You see, milk tends to aggravate all these problems, and sadly, many people haven’t lived a single day without consuming cow’s milk. Try 30 days, dairy free, and see how you feel. If you feel better, quit milk for good. I wouldn’t touch cow’s milk, personally.

For those of you worried about getting calcium in a dairy-free diet, don’t believe the milk industry hype. There are far better choices for dietary calcium. One cup of cooked quinoa (a supergrain) has more calcium than a cup of milk. A cup of broccoli juice does, too. You can get calcium from coral calcium supplements or from superfoods like chlorella and spirulina. If you’re concerned about not getting enough protein in your diet without red meat, just look to the same foods: quinoa is very high in protein, and it’s a complete protein, too (all eight amino acids). Spirulina has twelve times the digestible protein of beef, ounce per ounce, making it a far superior source of protein than cow flesh. Whey protein, even though derived from dairy, is also a good choice because it is isolated from the other problems typical of dairy products.

Reality check: I’m a strength trainer. I’ve put on maybe 10 pounds of solid muscle mass in the past year without touching a single piece of red meat. I get all my protein from spirulina, quinoa and soy products, with a piece of chicken or seafood from time to time. You don’t need beef to get protein, and you sure don’t need milk to get calcium. And, of course, if you avoid red meat and dairy products, you will also reduce your risk of lymphatic cancer.

Rember Cheese is milk.Do the Cheese.

posted by: Jason From Caseus on February 26, 2010  5:18pm

WOW! Thanks everyone for all your kind words about TheCheeseTruck! We are just starting up so if anyone has good ideas we are open to them.
Threefifths…..you are nuts. I really want to be diplomatic because I’m a business owner and I’m supposed to be…but you’ve gone off the deep end on this one! Cheese is the perfect food. Hands down! &:7) EAT CHEESE EVERYDAY!!!!!

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 26, 2010  6:37pm

Jason From Caseus

WOW! Thanks everyone for all your kind words about TheCheeseTruck! We are just starting up so if anyone has good ideas we are open to them.
Threefifths…..you are nuts. I really want to be diplomatic because I’m a business owner and I’m supposed to be…but you’ve gone off the deep end on this one! Cheese is the perfect food. Hands down! &:7) EAT CHEESE EVERYDAY!!!!!

You are right I am nuts cause I love to eat them. More Healther the Eating CHEESE EVERYDAY.

Check out the good old chesse that you are selling. Enjoy!!!!!!

Queseria Bendita Listeria-Contaminated Cheese Recall
Posted on February 21, 2010 by Drew Falkenstein

  The FDA announced yesterday a recall by Queseria Bendita of certain cheese products due to fears that the products are contaminated by Listeria monocytogenes.  The potentially lethal bacteria has been found at the Queseria Bendita facility and in samples of unopened, recalled product.

Queseria Bendita is a small cheesemaking operation in Yakima, WA. They’ve been operating since 2000 and make primarily Queso Fresco, Requeson and sometimes Queso Panela, which they distribute to Hispanic specialty markets in Everett, Seattle and Tacoma, Washington and Hillsboro, Oregon.  The company has recalled all these types of cheeses bearing a date code up to and including April 30, 2010.

How you like you Listeria.

Prolactal “deeply shocked” by listeria cheese deaths
By Guy Montague-Jones, 17-Feb-2010
Related topics: Financial & Industry

Austrian and German health authorities have revealed that six people died last year after eating listeria contaminated cheese made by Prolactal.

Four of the deaths occurred in Austria, where the health ministry said this week that its research had narrowed down the source of the cases to Prolactal’s acid curd cheese. German health authorities have also confirmed that two people died after contracting listeriosis from cheese made by the dairy company.

Reacting to the announcements, Prolactal, which is owned by Artax Group, said its executive management is “deeply shocked” by the cases.

Product recall

When the correlation between Prolactal cheese and the listeriosis cases first arose in January this year, Prolactal initiated a complete product recall throughout Europe.

The cheeses “Reinhardshof, Harzer Käse, 200g” and “Reinhardshof, Bauernkäse mit Edelschimmel, 200g”, which were stocked in Lidl supermarkets, were removed from shelves at the end of January.

Investigation

Austrian health authorities said a painstaking investigation involving investigators trawling through old shopping receipts was necessary to establish the link between the cheeses and the listeriosis cases

Prolactal has stopped production at its Hartberg site in Styria. Production will only begin again once the causes have been full clarified. An examination into the causal links between the listeria monocytogenes found in the cheese and the occurrences of illness is still ongoing.

Prolactal, which had sales revenues of €65m in 2007, said it has never experienced events with “even the vaguest similarity” in the 50 years that it has been producing acid curd cheese.

The Austrian health authorities said a total of 45 cases of listeria related illness were reported last year in the country, 11 of which resulted in death.

Listeria is a bacterium that can contaminate a range of foodstuffs from plants to meats and dairy products, and cause listeriosis in humans. The Austrian health ministry said the disease, which causes headaches, vomiting, and fever, can be particularly dangerous for the elderly. Around one in four cases result in death.

Cheese is also High in Cholesterol. And we know what High Cholesterol does to the body.

Cholesterol Contents of Cheese. Compiled from USDA Nutrient Database. © Copyright 2005, http://www.fatfreekitchen.com All rights reserved.
Colesterol content of Wt (g) Common Measure Chol per Measure
Cholesterol in Cheese food, pasteurized process, american, without di sodium phosphate 28.35 1 oz 18
Cheese sauce, prepared from recipe 243 1 cup 92
Cheese spread, pasteurized process, american, without di sodium phosphate 28.35 1 oz 16
Cheese, blue 28.35 1 oz 21
Cheese, camembert 38 1 wedge 27
Cholesterol in Cheese, cheddar 28.35 1 oz 30
Cheese, cottage, creamed, large or small curd 210 1 cup 32
Cheese, cottage, creamed, with fruit 226 1 cup 25
Cheese, cottage, lowfat, 1% milkfat 226 1 cup 9
Cheese, cottage, lowfat, 2% milkfat 226 1 cup 18
Cheese, cottage, nonfat, uncreamed, dry, large or small curd 145 1 cup 10
Cheese, cream 14.5 1 tbsp 16
Cheese, cream, fat free 15.6 1 tbsp 1
Cheese, feta 28.35 1 oz 25
Cheese, low fat, cheddar or colby
Cheese, mozzarella, part skim milk, low moisture
Cheese, mozzarella, whole milk
Cheese, muenster
Cheese, neufchatel
Cheese, parmesan, grated
Cheese, pasteurized process, american
Cheese, pasteurized process, swiss
Cheese, provolone
Cheese, ricotta, part skim milk
Cheese, ricotta, whole milk
Cheese, swiss
Cheesecake commercially prepared
28.35
28.35
28.35
28.35
28.35
5
28.35
28.35
28.35
246
246
28.35
80
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 tbsp
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 cup
1 cup
1 oz
1 piece
6
15
22
27
22
4
27
24
20
76
125
26
44


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkqT42G7Ffo

posted by: hausladen on February 26, 2010  7:18pm

Hey all - I’ve started a new haven restaurants twitter list:
http://twitter.com/hausladen/new-haven-restaurants

also, if you follow them and receive their updates on your SMS / text then you can have up to the minute information on where they are going to be pushed to your text message -

i’ve done this and gotten some great deal info from cafe nine and location information from the cupcake truck. if you know of any others that need to be added to the list, direct message me @hausladen

posted by: streever on February 26, 2010  11:00pm

3/5ths, Soy is one of the most processed foods on earth. I can’t honestly believe that it could be advanced over milk. Soy Milk for instance is actually horrible for you and uses a combination of battery acid & bases in it’s production.

I think you have to consider your sources and do some more research on this man. None of this stuff is good advice.

posted by: Closius Hart Arterries on February 27, 2010  11:38am

Yumm. What’s on a grilled cheese?

Butter and Cheese.

Great for a heart healthy diet?

Not the last time I checked!

All you fat Americans need carrots and celery not more cheese!

posted by: robn on February 27, 2010  11:50am

cheese is good
cheese lives
all true

3/5…since we’re all organisms in a constant state of living and dying, which one are you, half living or half dying?

life is hard but its fair…keep thinking about it brother

posted by: Greg on February 27, 2010  11:58am

Threefifths, this list of numbers at the end of your last comment has swayed me to your side:

28.35
28.35
28.35
28.35
28.35
5 28.35
28.35
28.35
246
246
28.35
80
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 tbsp
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz
1 cup
1 cup
1 oz
1 piece
6
15
22
27
22
4 27
24
20
76
125
26
44


Jason, I can’t wait to try out the Cheese Truck, and kudos to you for the food-related insult (“you are nuts”)

posted by: juli on February 27, 2010  3:11pm

three fifths. oh, how you make me laugh.

this is a story on a business that just so happens to sell cheese, among other things. therefore, it’s appropriate to turn it into a platform to lecture people on food choices?
it’s not only the wrong forum, but ridiculous that you actually think that by posting these things here that you will change the eating habits of readers.

even if you had posted long-winded helpful information, it is still a sea of text that somebody needed to shout into cyberspace.

can’t you find your own soapbox?

posted by: fairhavendoc on February 27, 2010  5:07pm

really, the editors of the independent shouldn’t publish crap like what 3/5ths is writing.  he should get his own blog for crap like that.  this is a “comments” section, not a “diatribe” or “manifesto” section.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 27, 2010  5:46pm

juli

three fifths. oh, how you make me laugh.

this is a story on a business that just so happens to sell cheese, among other things. therefore, it’s appropriate to turn it into a platform to lecture people on food choices?
it’s not only the wrong forum, but ridiculous that you actually think that by posting these things here that you will change the eating habits of readers.

even if you had posted long-winded helpful opinion, it is still a sea of text that somebody needed to shout into cyberspace.

can’t you find your own soapbox?

I am just a opinionated speaker.what can I say. Bottom line I don’t care if you or anyone eat’s all the Cheese in the world that is your right.But thank god for the New Haven Independent for let me and everyone use this soapbox forum to express our opinion.

P.S. You must be a cheese lover.

posted by: William Kurtz on February 27, 2010  7:01pm

Congratulations to Caseus.  I am looking forward to good grilled-cheese sandwich, even if man doesn’t—and shouldn’t—live by cheese alone. 

Isn’t there something in the community guidelines about publishing a nearly 9,000 word “comment” consisting of nearly no original material?  I cut and pasted it into MS Word out of curiosity.  With one-inch margins, that last post runs to 18 pages.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 27, 2010  8:44pm

William Kurtz
Congratulations to Caseus.  I am looking forward to good grilled-cheese sandwich, even if man doesn’t—and shouldn’t—live by cheese alone. 

Isn’t there something in the community guidelines about publishing a nearly 9,000 word “comment” consisting of nearly no original material?  I cut and pasted it into MS Word out of curiosity.  With one-inch margins, that last post runs to 18 pages.

Yes you don’t have to read the post.Case closed!!!

posted by: Nan Bartow on February 27, 2010  11:44pm

Methinks Jason, Tom, and the Cheese Truck are winning in this competition.  Three cheers for grilled cheese sandwiches and heirloom tomato soup from Caseus!!!

posted by: dave on February 28, 2010  5:51am

and the original…....
http://www.thegrilledcheesetruck.com or on twitter @grlldcheesetruk…
but we are flattered!!!

posted by: ROBN on February 28, 2010  2:46pm

Its been a pleasure to read such rare bits of comment from 3/5.

posted by: angelo on February 28, 2010  3:59pm

Mr. Kurtz - this is nothing compared to some of Threefifths posts, all in the nature of attaching his favorite articles, usually opposing an elected school board. The response is always the same - don’t read it - but it is interesting to see how the discussion ebbs after one of attachments. The effect is that it becomes a private forum.  A recent education thread had over 25 posts, with the majority of them consisting of three people repeating the same thing to each other, over and over.  Threefifths won on quantity, but many of his posts were cheesy.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 28, 2010  6:45pm

angelo

Mr. Kurtz - this is nothing compared to some of Threefifths posts, all in the nature of attaching his favorite articles, usually opposing an elected school board. The response is always the same - don’t read it - but it is interesting to see how the discussion ebbs after one of attachments. The effect is that it becomes a private forum.  A recent education thread had over 25 posts, with the majority of them consisting of three people repeating the same thing to each other, over and over.  Threefifths won on quantity, but many of his posts were cheesy.

Let me first correct you.I am for a elected school board. Not one pick by the mayor. Second I was just trying to follow what Mr.Streever said and that was Man, I know you’re smarter than this! Do some research and look into what he’s pedaling and what is in it. So I did just that.

posted by: Derek on February 28, 2010  11:14pm

five-fiths of me say, “Cheese. Yum!” I will track down this truck Real Soon and sample its wares. ...

posted by: CT Web Design on March 1, 2010  2:41am

I think this is a great example of what happens when you’re able to connect with your customers on a personal, interesting level. I’ll have to stop by

posted by: question on March 1, 2010  10:05am

WHERE are the server’s GLOVES???

posted by: robn on March 1, 2010  11:54pm

...rare bits….

anybody get it?