Cop Conundrum: Hire Jamarr Daniels?

Allan Appel PhotoJamarr Daniels teared up as he told how his father ran the streets and died when Jamarr was 12. His five older brothers all followed their dad into the streets. Jamarr determined one day to become a cop.

Thwarted in that quest, he made a last-ditch appeal to commissioners who would decide his fate.

Daniels was one of eight candidates for the cop academy who had their cases come up one last time for reconsideration Tuesday night before the Board of Police Commissioners. They had passed written and oral and agility tests to qualify as potential cops. But then Police Chief Anthony Campbell recommended to the board that they be eliminated from the list of potential recruits because of information that emerged during background checks about, among other issues, drug and criminal histories.

The commissioners sustained seven of Campell’s eight recommendations for removal from the list after hearing from some of the candidates.

The commissioners also heard from Daniels. He had a story to tell. The commissioners were all ears.

Before deciding whether to follow Campbell’s recommendation, or whether to allow Daniels to continue through the application process, the commissioners wrestled with tough questions about how to weigh the pros and cons of applciations from New Haveners in the quest to build a more local and diverse police force.

After hearing his story, two commissioners voted to remove his name from the list. Two voted to let him remain on the list. Since a majority voted is required to remove a candidate from the list, Daniels skated by. For now.

Thomas MacMillan File PhotoDaniels is 25 years old. Like other candidates recommended for elimination Tuesday night, Daniels had a choice of making his case to the commissioners either in private or out in public. He chose to speak in public.

He spoke of how, as a teen, he was one of earliest participants in the Police “Explorers” program for aspiring cops. He attended Police Athletic League camp; he later served as a counselor. (Click here to read a story about that and his police dreams at the time. And here about his participation in a 2017 cop-recruitment effort.)  Daniels is now a young father struggling for custody of his 4-year-old son and how to manage anger, he said.

Daniels also recalled working as an intern helping the police department upgrade its databases,with an eye on becoming an officer himself. He graduated from Wilbur Cross High School

“I want to be an example for my son,” Daniels concluded.

Allan Appel Photo“We appreciate all you’ve done,” responded time-pressed Commissioner Stephen Garcia. (He had five other stories to listen to.) “But what did you take issue with in the file?”

Daniels quickly listed some of the issues that were flagged in his file: A fight with his mom’s husband when he was 16; a 2011 fight with his girlfriend; a shoplifting incident at Walmart in 2014; and this year a custody dispute with his wife in which he was arrested on Father’s Day.

“What is your relationship with the child’s mother?” asked Commissioner Greg Smith.

“It’s OK.”

“So if you became a police officer, how would you handle it?” asked Commission Chair Anthony Dawson.

“We’re striving to be cordial,” said Daniels, “for our son’s sake.”

Markeshia Ricks Photo“And if you couldn’t be cordial?” Smith followed up.

Daniels said his ex-wife’s mother is a counselor. At present she is the referee and go-between in the clearly fraught situation. He and his wife have not yet gone to more formal, objective counseling.

“How will you deal with conflict?” Smith pressed.

“I become hot-headed only [about] my son. I’m not an angry person,” Daniels replied in a soft and measured voice.

The last issue brought up was Daniels application for a pistol permit. He was disqualified when he applied to get one in New Haven based on psychological criteria, he said. Then he went to Hamden and received a permit there.

“Were you living in Hamden?” asked Smith.

Daniels: “No.”

“Isn’t that required for a permit?”

“Yes,” said Daniels,

Allan Appel PhotoThe commissioners thanked Daniels. Then he vacated his seat for the others to follow.

Later, in an interview in the hallway outside of the commissioners’ board room where deliberations were taking place, Daniels said that this is the fourth time he has applied to become a New Haven police officer.

Nearby, also awaiting the outcome of the vote, was retired New Haven police Captain Odell Cohens, a 34-year veteran of the force (1963-1997). Cohens came to support Daniels.

“I’ve known him since he was a kid and was enamored of the police uniform,” he said. “He scored high on the test. He has no [criminal] convictions. Every officer on this force, everyone has problems.”

Cohens, who during his long career was involved in vetting potential officers, expressed skepticism about current methods for screening candidates, including the background checks and psychological tests, which he said tend unfairly to knock especially African-Americans out of the process.

“We did polygraphs, but not psychological tests. We did background checks, but not credit checks. We hired you for your character. I don’t like the psychological evaluation. They are systematically eliminating blacks from this job,” he concluded.

When told of Cohens’s criticism, Chief Campbell noted that state law now requires psychological testing.

After working with a consultant, the department is on the verge of hiring a new company, which will be announced in the coming days, he said.

Daniels and the current crop of candidates on the list will have to undergo that psychological test before being asked to join an academy class.

Campbell was at pains to point out his efforts to ensure fairness in the hiring process. “We’ve been addressing Cohens’s point for a long time,” he said.

He called attention to a system of checks and balances in the process. During background checks, for example, each candidate is now asked the same questions. The sessions are taped and recorded. This had never before been the case.

Campbell also said that the background check officer’s work is reviewed by a supervisor. Then he looks at each case with an eye to consistency and checks and balances. And now candidates can review their files in advance of making pitches like Tuesday night’s. “In the past there was none of this,” Campbell said.

“We recruit from the human race,” Commission Chair Dawson noted, “so you know emotions are there.

“However, we’ve been asked by the citizens of New Haven to find the best candidates.”

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posted by: JayC on April 11, 2018  9:19pm

Good story, which I truly hope can result in a happy ending for this determined young man. 
I was also genuinely pleased to read that Capt.Odell Cohens is alive and well. My memory is slower now, but I think back to reading many NH Register stories about him and Otha Buffalo.

posted by: Ex-NHPD on April 11, 2018  9:25pm

Let me see if I have this right.

Daniels is 25 years old. You have to be 21 to apply for a Pistol Permit.  Within the last 4 years, he was turned down for one in New Haven (where he resides) for “psychological” reason.

He then went to Hamden and prepared a false (sworn) application, claiming he was a Hamden resident, when he was not one, and received a CT State Pistol Permit.  He admitted this to the New Haven Board of Police Commissioners.

He also admits to being “hot headed” about his son.

Has his Pistol Permit been revoked?

Has the Hamden PD investigated his False Statements to procure the Permit?  If so, is there an arrest pending?

He has applied 4 times to the NHPD. In those years, he has been arrested for Shoplifting and Domestic Violence, and falsely applied for a Pistol Permit.

How much of this was found during the background check by NHPD?  Was the Pistol Permit issue uncovered there?

How could 2 Commissioners still feel he is a valid candidate? 

Potential NHPD Candidates have been removed for much less than Daniels’ history.

posted by: Atwater on April 11, 2018  9:54pm

So, this guy has a history of domestic violence, theft and lying on a permit application, but he’s a good fit for the NHPD? They must really be desperate for recruits. This man should not be a police officer, he should not be given the authority or incumbent responsibility. I’m wondering how bad the other candidates were that they got passed over. Scary.

posted by: new havener on April 11, 2018  10:31pm

I was was kind of dumbfounded by the thought of a self-admitted anger-management individual getting assigned a pistol by the NHPD, when he has to “strive to be cordial” to his son’s mother(as if this is not a problem/red-flag)...and THEN I read he got a carry-permit after being denied by New Haven, by lying to Hamden, as if that was an honorable thing to admit to…yeesh!

Nice kid? Maybe. I’ll trust Cohens on that.

Nice candidate for a cop? Not so much.

posted by: Callisto on April 12, 2018  6:53am

I commend this young man for trying to break the cycle of the streets in the way that his siblings have not or cannot. This could change the trajectory of his lineage from here on out. Overcoming the loss of his dad at 12 must have had profound effects on his life. Compare your own experiences to these challenging circumstances before judging who he is. And while I understand many will disagree with this, in a country that makes it easy as pie for mentally deranged 18 year olds to go to a gun show and load up on automatic weapons I just don’t look at the permit violation as a deal breaker. Maybe in a country so rife with defacto segregation and systematized racism the system can bend a little to give this well-meaning perseverant young man a chance.

posted by: AverageTaxpayer on April 12, 2018  7:16am

Maybe it is time to switch “dreams”?

Given the facts, no way Daniels should be allowed to join the force. Too much potential liability for New Haven Taxpayers, not to mention genuine risk to citizens from this guy’s lack of self-control.

I can think of many careers this guy would be better suited for, — those jobs that don’t involve carrying a gun!

posted by: Peter99 on April 12, 2018  8:05am

Giving a person a badge, gun and police powers is an awesome responsibility for both the giver and taker of those items. Our best predictor of the future is what you have done in the past. This man has not shown maturity, honesty or good temperament and judgement in the recent past. He demonstrated that if he could not get something (a gun permit) honestly, he would get one by braking the rules. We do not need another rule breaker arresting people in New Haven, which will result in large lawsuits which the taxpayers will have to fund. We have to pick the best of the best for our police department. If we are having a problem recruiting, then we need to make the job more attractive to the most well qualified applicants. You do not lower the standards to meet recruiting quotas. Race, gender, and where you live should not be hiring factors. Try to get candidates that mirror the demographics of the city, from the city, but do not lower the standards.

posted by: duncanidaho645 on April 12, 2018  8:28am

It is unfortunate for him that he chose to air all this in public.  He has left the commission little opportunity to keep him as a candidate.

posted by: alphabravocharlie on April 12, 2018  8:39am

Start putting some money in the bank for the inevitable lawsuits.

posted by: robn on April 12, 2018  8:41am

The pistol permit thing is disturbing on its surface because it could indicate delusion. But there’s another way to look at it. If he had bad intentions he could have purchased a firearm illegally on the street. It seems like he was challenging a system which seems to be arbitrary. However, that would have been better managed by a theatrical protest/announcement of the two results immediately after gaining a permit in another town…which brings me back to the why and it seems to lean a bit towards delusion.

posted by: Callisto on April 12, 2018  8:44am

“Race, gender, and where you live should not be hiring factors…” Agreed, but neither should they be factors when getting pulled over, searched, sentenced to a prison term or when deadly force is used. Yet apparently they are. When is the last time you read about a controversial killing of a white citizen by a black officer? The proliferation of cell phone cameras has proven time and time again that the problem is not hot-headed black officers but a small percentage of white officers who have historically relied on the silence of the thin blue line to protect their militaristic, hyper-violent approach to policing. I wonder how many incidences of police killings have been successfully swept under the rug before the spread of cellphone video….

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on April 12, 2018  11:18am

@ Ex-NHPD

Now Let me see if I have this right.

Controversial Cop’s Rehiring OK’d

A former detective with a past checkered with misconduct is once again a sworn officer in New Haven, after a vote and secretive deliberations by the Police Commission.After going into executive session to receive a legal opinion from its attorney on “resignation, rescission of resignation and the role of [the] Board,” the commissioners decided Monday night that they needed to vote on whether or not to rehire Conklin.Conklin resigned from the New Haven force effective Nov. 27 after the town of Westport hired him.He was set to be sworn in there the week of Nov. 27. Then an online news site in that town, called WestportNow, reprinted a New Haven Independent story about Conklin’s checkered history, including internal affairs investigations into three separate incidents that concluded that Conklin had harassed and falsely arrested citizens and then offered untrue versions of events under oath.“ Conklin denied the misconduct allegations. (Click here for a story detailing those incidents.) In one instance, investigators found, Conklin destroyed evidence on a bogus stop. In a second he harassed and arrested a man outside his home on trumped-up charges. He shoved and threatened to tow the “fucking car” of a “motherfucker” fisherman who’d parked on a bridge in the third incident. He served a total of one day of suspension for those misdeeds.The commission brought him in just to talk to him and let him know that ‘You came back after leaving, and we expect you to do an even better job curtailing some of the public opinions about you,’” Dawson said. “And he sort of agreed that he’s a good officer and that he would need to demonstrate to this body that he would be even a better officer.”

My question to all.How did he get his job back?

posted by: concerned_neighbor on April 12, 2018  11:20am

Self-described as “hot-headed”? Can’t wait for him to be armed and on the beat. Liability in uniform.

posted by: Statestreeter on April 12, 2018  12:08pm

Callisto you present an illogical contrast when mentioning an 18 deranged person. Blame the ACLU too, besides the NRA, for pushing for the removal of people on SS that can’t manage there own finances being removed from the NICS system.

He listed SOME of the issues that were flagged in his file. A fight with his mom’s husband when he was 16; a 2011 fight with his girlfriend he was 18; a shoplifting incident at Walmart in 2014 he was 21; and this year a custody dispute with his wife in which he was arrested on Father’s Day he was 25. Falsifying a permit to have the right to obtain and carry a firearm, had to be at least 21.

A few things stand out here. Not counting the fight with his step dad he has had at least reported incidents of domestic violence with a female partner, stole or attempted to steal something from a store and lied on a government document to obtain the right to purchase and carry a firearm.

Remember that these are only some of the things that are in his file and I’ll venture to guess that his theft attempt at Walmart wasn’t his first. In his adult age he has shown lack of self control and anger management, an ability to lie on a grander scale than most would and no problem committing theft. Mind you this is being done by a person who has always wanted to be a cop. He didn’t switch career ambitions last year he has always wanted to do this and engaged in this behavior anyway.

Your concerns about police behavior being swept under the rug is a valid point. Hopefully we can avoid this behavior by not starting out hiring someone who has a track record of violence, theft and deception. Putting on a suit, tie and a smile for 15 minutes isn’t hard. To enter your world of illogical comparisons John Wayne Gacy did the same.

posted by: Ex-NHPD on April 12, 2018  12:38pm

@THREEFIFTHS:

I don’t like to respond to other posts that call me out, but here goes:

Please show me where I supported Conklin’s re-hiring on the NHI site or anywhere else.

I know that through the years, the NHPD has been woefully inept at weeding out Probationary Officers who are demonstrating questionable performance.  Inevitably, those officers go on to become liabilities.  And when they really screw up and the Department is looking for a Paper Trail to show their unsuitability to stay on the job, it isn’t there; that has been a hallmark of the NHPD for years.  When the Department does have the ammunition to support a termination, more often than not, the State Labor Board overturns the termination (not just at the NHPD, but other PD’s as well).  There are some mind blowing examples through the years of the Labor Board giving jobs back to some real bad actors, not only in Law Enforcement.

So, in my 25 year experience at the NHPD (13 as a Supervisor), I believe a candidate with Daniels’ past AND present would not be a suitable hire.

And since you asked, if I had been Chief when Conklin asked to be re-hired, I would have declined his request.

posted by: strangefruit on April 12, 2018  1:02pm

I don’t know why he just didn’t tell the Board he’s an NRA member. I’m surprised he did not have them come out and lobby for him.

posted by: concerned_neighbor on April 12, 2018  1:30pm

The Commissioners could be smarter than you think - by getting Daniels to admit that he lied on his pistol permit application to hamden, he has arguably confessed to committing a crime. At the very least, someone should send the testimony to the Board of Pistol and Firearm Examiners and they would likely revoke his permit based on that particular (and alleged) lie.

posted by: JohnDVelleca on April 12, 2018  2:25pm

@ 3/5 and Ex-NHPD

Regarding Conklin, the way I understood the situation was that he never officially quit and there wasn’t the necessary"break” in service that would constitute a binding resignation that could not be retracted at the officer’s discretion.  Ex-NHPD, you may remember the C-Squad cop from years ago who walked into the Shift Commander’s office and said “this place sucks, I quit” then gave me his gun and badge and disappeared for two weeks.  In two weeks, he came back to work as though nothing happened and simply stated that he retracted his resignation.  Per order of the chief, he got his gear back and went to work; no harm, no foul apparently.  Conklin really didn’t need approval from anyone to come back because he never really left.  The BOPC meeting was your typical NHPD “dog ‘n pony” show. 

With regard to this kid Daniels, this isn’t rocket science.  I get he made some mistakes, we can forgive some of them.  Everybody makes mistakes.  But, he was denied a pistol permit for “psychological reasons.”  That issue needs to be explored to a greater degree.  If Daniels can’t get a permit for these reasons I’d be very skeptical that he would be able to pass the psychological exam administered during the hiring process for a police officer.  And if he did, those results would surely be suspect.  If he passed the psych exam for being hired and failed the psych portion for a simple pistol permit, then something is wrong here.  Maybe I should remind all involved that in the early 1990’s the NHPD lost it’s ability to train and certify its own officers because the hiring standards were being manipulated.  The POST council de-certified the academy and all NHPD recruits had to go to POST for basic training (I was one of them, class 234).  Furthermore, given the current controversy regarding that process (the psych exam) this is a “can of worms” that doesn’t need to be opened.  Standards need to be maintained because being a police officer is serious business.

posted by: 1644 on April 12, 2018  3:03pm

Callisto:  You can read about a black officer killing a white woman just about any day, i.e.. the killing of Justine Diamond by Officer Noor.  An indictment was just returned by a grand jury, with bitter complaints by the prosecutor about the Blue Wall of Silence that protected the officer.

As others have commented , this guy is a lawsuit waiting to happen.  NHPD knows (a) he is dishonest, (b) he cannot control his temper.  Moreover, these are not youthful indiscretions.  They are continuing long into adulthood even as he professes he wants to be a police officer.  If NHPD doesn’t trust him to have a firearm as regular person, how on earth can it even consider giving him one as a police officer?  Other than the dishonesty (larceny, falsified pistol permit), he may be earnest and well-meaning, just as Conklin may be.  But both of them are too short-fused to be police officers.

posted by: JCFremont on April 12, 2018  3:32pm

Too bad this isn’t Hollywood, this troubled youth would have been accepted into the academy but silently removed where he would be stealthily trained then moved into undercover work for narcotic or anti-gang divisions. No doubt he would be called a traitor, by some but a hero by others.

posted by: Jonathan Hopkins on April 12, 2018  3:46pm

I wish Daniels the best of luck and hope that he is able to redirect his passion towards something else that is positive for himself and his family, because I think the commissioners’ concerns are valid. It might be useful for Daniels to think about this from the point of view of the commissioners. What would he imagine as a desirable candidate for a police officer? And what qualities in an applicant might raise red flags about future liabilities for the police department?

Individuals are genuinely capable of turning their lives around, and people shouldn’t rush to judgment about a domestic violence case without knowing the details of the specific case. However, this police officer candidate process cannot get inside the head of every applicant to know their true intentions. Nor can it devote years to getting to know individual applicants on a personal level. So while Daniels might very well be capable of becoming a good officer, the selection process is limited by time, information, and resources and therefore must, to some extent, rely on gut feelings, indicators of future liability, and face value assessments. These are imperfect qualities of any job selection process. Daniels has to realize that while he may know his personal intentions and character, the fact that he may have been involved in a shoplifting incident, a domestic violence incident, and a pistol permit application fiasco sends a message to the commissioners that he might be a future liability who could use his position of power to deal with personal issues within his family and lead to future litigation against the City, or other bad outcomes. Not that this would necessarily be the case if he became an officer, but that there is enough to question here to deny the applicant.

There are many other careers besides law enforcement that can be fulfilling, and I hope that Daniels is able to find one that he excels in.

posted by: 1644 on April 12, 2018  5:08pm

JCFremont: You’re thinking of a police version of the Dirty Dozen? Or a remake of LA Confidential?

posted by: Statestreeter on April 12, 2018  6:34pm

Well JohnDVelleca you understood it wrong. Conklin resignation was just that, a resignation. That’s why for him to return to the NHPD the matter had to go before the police commission.

There action with Conklin, that was recommended by Chief Campbell, highlights everything that is wrong with not only the NHPD but other city departments. When they have the opportunity to get it right the are either to incompetent to do it or just don’t give a crap. Conklin should have never been rehired. Westport got it why can’t New Haven.

The Department hierarchy should be cleaned out from the current commissioners to the Chief.

Here’s the article on the Conklin re-hire.

http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/conklin/

[Ed.: Conklin turned in his resignation. It was filed and processed by the human resources department and publicly reported. It took effect. Then Conklin was set to be sworn into a new job in another town when the offer was revoked. At that point he came to see the assistant chief in New Haven and asked for his job back. The matter then went to the Board of Police Commissioners. The chief enthusiastically approved of allowing him to return and stated that the only problem with Conklin’s record is that some people falsely believed there was a problem.]

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on April 12, 2018  7:30pm

posted by: Ex-NHPD on April 12, 2018 12:38pm
@THREEFIFTHS:

I don’t like to respond to other posts that call me out, but here goes:

Please show me where I supported Conklin’s re-hiring on the NHI site or anywhere else.

Please show me where I said you Did?

All I said was.

My question to all.How did he get his job back?

You said this.
I know that through the years, the NHPD has been woefully inept at weeding out Probationary Officers who are demonstrating questionable performance.  Inevitably, those officers go on to become liabilities.  And when they really screw up and the Department is looking for a Paper Trail to show their unsuitability to stay on the job, it isn’t there; that has been a hallmark of the NHPD for years.  When the Department does have the ammunition to support a termination, more often than not, the State Labor Board overturns the termination (not just at the NHPD, but other PD’s as well).  There are some mind blowing examples through the years of the Labor Board giving jobs back to some real bad actors, not only in Law Enforcement.

So I got a answer on How He got his Job back.

My bad. Can you or anyone tell me how she got to retire with a Medical Pension whe she did this.


New Haven police officer arrested for larceny in Stratford

An officer with the New Haven Police Department was arrested for shoplifting in Stratford in September.

Police charged 38-year-old Jennifer McDermott with sixth-degree larceny.

http://tastiefish.com/new-haven/exclusive-tastie-fish-obtains-video-of-a-nhpd-officer-stealing-from-bjs/

posted by: JohnDVelleca on April 12, 2018  9:08pm

@Statestreeter

Well, I certainly could have been misinformed about the details regarding the Conklin situation.  It’s not like I haven’t been wrong before.  And given that this is a very emotionally charged issue, especially with the editor, I’ll concede and stand corrected for the sake of avoiding conflict.  However, I will unequivocally state that accepting an employee’s resignation and deciding whether to allow that resignation to be rescinded is not a straighforward issue.  It’s not a black and white area, it’s gray.  Especially when the circumstances surrounding the inital resignation have changed (i.e. the new job is no longer there to be had).  Based on past precedent, Conklin would have been allowed to rescind his resignation.  Any other decision would have surely been overturned by the state labor board.  Don’t blame Campbell or the current commisioners, blame the long list of Chief’s who made poor decisions to rehire previous officers who tendered a resignation only to rescind it at a later time.  That’s were the precedent was set.  Navigating employment law is not an easy task.  It’s easy to be an administrative genius when you’re merely blogging in to a local media site, but it’s another when you have to actually take substantive action.  Truth be told, I don’t even know Conklin.  But I do know that the waters surrounding the entire “Conklin thing” are muddy and there is not much that can be done.  The last word is yours my friend, since I don’t want this discussion to get off track and back onto the “Conklin thing.”

posted by: Ex-NHPD on April 12, 2018  9:25pm

Well THREEFIFTHS, since you asked me (again),  see my previous post explained how bad apples are allowed to ferment.
Regarding how one may able to retire is an extension of that.

This is a generalization of the system and not specific to the case you cited :
When you hire and then fail to hold problem employees responsible for their bad actions, the chickens come home to roost.  I would guess if the NHPD terminated someone for an off-duty misdemeanor non-violent arrest, the Arbitration Board would in almost every case not sustain the termination.  If there were on-duty issues that were never appropriately addressed, the City would have to rely only on an arrest for termination.  Then the City would have to decide if offering a retirement was the best course of action to avoid future bigger (expensive) problems.

That’s the system. Sometimes you have to do something you don’t want (let one retire) to settle the issue.  That is why the City and the Department need to do due diligence in vetting potential officers.  There will always be bad apples who slip through the process. But if you truly honor the process that potential officers go through to be hired, you can minimize the number of unqualified who get through.

posted by: NewHaven06512 on April 12, 2018  11:00pm

The pistol permit thing in and of itself is a felony, which he just admitted to committing.His denial and subsequent reapplication in another town is disturbing.

posted by: Hill North on April 13, 2018  2:17am

Stratford Police Department charged 38-year-old Jennifer McDermott from New Haven Police Officer with sixth-degree larceny

https://amp.wfsb.com/story/36540702/new-haven-police-officer-arrested-for-larceny-in-stratford

posted by: narcan on April 13, 2018  2:41am

He confessed to a class D felony during his interview with the commissioners.

Hopefully someone with a better background is chosen in his stead.

posted by: 1644 on April 13, 2018  6:39am

3/5’s. The reason these bad cops keep their jobs or are able to retire is the union, civil service, and constitutional protections for government employees that you so vigorously defend.  If cops were at-will employees, with no right to continued employment, no Loudermill hearings, etc., we could fire questionable cops, thereby increasing public confidence in our police forces and enhancing public safety.  Unfortunately, US courts and the police themselves do not prioritize integrity and public safety: they prioritize employment rights.

posted by: 1644 on April 13, 2018  7:15am

JohnDV:  NHPD may have been legally required to re-hire Conklin,  but Campbell’s effusive praise was repulsive.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on April 13, 2018  8:12am

posted by: 1644 on April 13, 2018 6:39am

3/5’s. The reason these bad cops keep their jobs or are able to retire is the union, civil service, and constitutional protections for government employees that you so vigorously defend.  If cops were at-will employees, with no right to continued employment, no Loudermill hearings, etc., we could fire questionable cops, thereby increasing public confidence in our police forces and enhancing public safety.  Unfortunately, US courts and the police themselves do not prioritize integrity and public safety: they prioritize employment rights.

Not True.Police and Public Sector works can be fired.How about in the private sector that you so vigorously defend where CEO’S can wreck and Bankrupt companies.And get those goodies call golden parachutes.

Meet the 21 CEOs who got golden parachutes of $100 million and more

The 21 $100 million-plus CEOs include William McGuire, of UnitedHealth Group, who was “asked to leave” (or whatever other euphemism we apply to rich people who get fired) when “he became embroiled in a stock options backdating scandal.” Nonetheless, he got a payout of $285 million. Home Depot stock prices were stagnant under Robert Nardelli, and shareholders and the board were not happy with how much he was making as CEO, but when he left, it was with more than $220 million. Pfizer lost $140 billion (with a B) in market value under Hank McKinnell, Jr., but he walked away with $188 million.

Look at more these goodies

Bankruptcy judge approves $14M Toys R Us executive bonus payout

The judge overseeing the Toys R Us bankruptcy ruled Tuesday the insolvent retailer can pay its 17 top executives $14 million in incentive bonuses.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/nation-now/2017/12/05/bankruptcy-judge-approves-14-m-toys-r-us-executive-bonus-payout/925447001/

posted by: 1644 on April 13, 2018  11:10am

3/5’s:  Each CEO’s case is unique, but I generally think their pay is excessive and vote against it in shareholder votes.  In any case, CEO pay is a private matter between the employee and the shareholders, just as pay and benefits for Yale police are private matters.  Moreover, unlike cops, we don’t grant CEO the right to use violence against people. 
        As to firing public employees, while it is possible, in almost every case their entitled to vested pension benefits, and is also exceedingly difficult.  The bar for firing is incredibly high and the case of the Danbury cop who threatened the illegal immigrant shows.  Courts and arbitration panels generally hold public safety and police integrity as less important than a cop’s continued employment.

A s others have pointed out, the difficulty in firing bad cops makes it all the more critical that we avoid hiring anyone who has a substantial chance of being a bad cop. We want people who can keep their cool in amazingly stressful situations, and who are honest.

posted by: JCFremont on April 13, 2018  3:01pm

@1644 I was thinking small screen,  The Mod Squad, or 21 Jump Street.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on April 13, 2018  4:26pm

posted by: 1644 on April 13, 2018 11:10am
3/5’s:  Each CEO’s case is unique, but I generally think their pay is excessive and vote against it in shareholder votes. 

I am not talking about their pay.I am talikng about how when they wreck and Bankrupt companies.And get those goodies call golden parachutes.Again Look at Stanley O’Neal who was the chief executive at Merrill Lynch.The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission had recommended that O’Neal be prosecuted for multiple crimes in connection with his activities as CEO of Merrill Lynch during the lead up to the sub-prime crisis.O’Neal resigned as CEO. He left with a severance package including Merrill stock and options worth $161.5 million on top of the $91.4 million in total compensation he earned in 2006.

Moreover, unlike cops, we don’t grant CEO tight to he ruse violence against people. 

Who grants the rights for cops to use violence against people. Can you show this to me.

Again as far bad cops.Or public employees.It depents on what the charges are.In fact some states.Also A Pension Becomes Property of the Public Employee After 10 Years.

As to firing public employees, while it is possible, in almost every case their entitled to vested pension benefits, and is also exceedingly difficult.

The the courts have been careful to establish that not every criminal conviction, regardless of the reprehensible acts at issue, results in a loss of pension.

posted by: 1644 on April 13, 2018  5:19pm

3/5’s Cops are authorized to use force (aka violence) to effect arrests, etc.

As to the financial crisis, were I king of the world, there would have been a lot more Lehman brothers.  As for O’Neal, Merrill was still standing when he left, so that’s between him and his board and shareholders.  Like public employees’ pension, I would assume most of his payout was vested.  In actuality, Thain, a vile person, rooked BoA in a sale forced by Bernake.  BoA, at the government’s urging, bought Countrywide and Merrill, then the government sued BoA for the sins of the companies it urged BoA to buy.  Again, personally, if we could not let the banks go under, we should have nationalized them.  That’s pretty much what the UK did with Lloyds and RBS.  BTW, I had a far interest in many banks (not on their level, but on mine).  If you haven’t, watch Moral Hazard some time.

posted by: NewHaven06512 on April 13, 2018  7:52pm

look at what is going on in Hamden. The Sgt actually assaulted someone after leaving town on duty and still has his job!! its almost impossible to fire the thugs that are on these departments.  Until they make a decision they are typically on paid vacations or doing work they weren’t hired to do.  NO SPECIAL TREATMENT!

posted by: Callisto on April 14, 2018  6:13am

Thanks for setting me straight about all my “illogical comparisons”. Now what we’re you saying about John Wayne Gacy?