Teacher Hiring Quest Aims South

Paul Bass Photo A renewed effort to hire more black and Latino schoolteachers rests in part on Debbie Breland finding Southerners to make the same move north that she made three decades ago — to teach in a New Haven public school.
NHPS

Breland is the new minority teacher recruitment coordinator for the city school system.

She joined local government and NAACP leaders outside the Board of Education on Meadow Street Thursday in announcing a renewed determination to lure more teachers of color, a quest that has proved difficult for many school systems like New Haven’s.

The announcement came on the day when the governor signed Public Act 16-41, a new law aimed at making that quest easier, by, among other efforts, eliminating some teacher certification requirements considered outdated and irrelevant to needed skills; and by easing the way for qualified teachers to transfer their certification to Connecticut, especially from southern states.

New Haven officials said at the Thursday event that they plan to use those tools to build a “pipeline” to the 30 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that have teacher certification programs. Those schools tend to be located in southern states from which until now it was difficult to transfer teaching certification to Connecticut.

The state and local NAACP announced that it will help build that pipeline by co-hosting a minority teacher recruitment conference at Yale on Dec. 1 and 2. Invitees will include presidents and deans from HBCUs, along with school principals and human resources officials, according to state NAACP President Scot X. Esdaile.

“Students will learn more readily when they make a connection with a teacher and with the way in which a teacher presents information,” Mayor Toni Harp said. “When a student of color walks into a classroom and sees a teacher of color, a connection is likely to be made more readily and a student / teacher relationship can more quickly grow to become that between a student and a mentor. The ability to ‘identify’ with one another is the key in these interactions.”

Talk about the southern pipeline took Breland’s mind back to 1987, when, as a 22-year-old Fayetteville State University graduate in North Carolina, she received a recruiting call from New Haven.

The city’s then-schools superintendent, John Dow, had made recruiting black teachers from HBCUs a priority. Breland was flown to New Haven to attend a recruiting event sponsored by Yale and the Urban League. When she signed on to teach English at Career High School, she received help finding an apartment where the landlord agreed to waive the security deposit.

Breland has remained in the system ever since, recently ascending to the teacher recruitment post, where she said she’s working with her colleagues in the school system to revive that pipeline.

“I’m growing my own,” she added. Her daughter, a Coop High senior, plans to attend Southern Connecticut State university next year with the intention of earning her teaching certification in order to work with children with autism. Breland said her dream is for her daughter to teach at the new $45 million K-4 Strong “lab” school New Haven is building in partnership with SCSU.

Data Revelations

Most New Haven public school students — 82 percent — are black and Latino. Most New Haven teachers — 77 percent — are white.

Data released Thursday by the school system cast doubt on assumptions made by those on the left and the right about why the city doesn’t have more black teachers.

Affirmative-action critics have charged that the school system plays racial favorites, meaning that white candidates can’t get hired for teaching positions. The school district has publicized its efforts to recruit more teachers of color. And yet it’s still hiring more white candidates than black and Latino candidates. Recruitment efforts have produced some results: 18 percent of teachers hired over the past year are black, and 13 percent are Latino, Superintendent of Schools Garth Harries announced Thursday. That means the vast majority are still white.

Some critics in town have charged that school officials prefer to hire white teachers and bypass black and Latino candidates. It turns out that the district doesn’t receive many applications from teachers of color. District human resources chief Lisa Mack estimated that only 25 percent of applicants are black or Latino.

Board of Education member Edward Joyner and teachers union President David Cicarella agreed that the problem lies not in an intention to avoid hiring blacks and Latinos, but rather in the need to develop more of an applicant pool, in part through that south-to-North pipeline. “You can be a great teacher in North Carolina,” Joyner remarked, and not get permission to teach here in New Haven.

He said New Haven would benefit by changing that. Just ask Debbie Breland.

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posted by: AliceB on October 20, 2016  5:08pm

Exactly which “requirements”  are going to be eliminated??  If requirements are being adjusted for some then they must be adjusted for all. That is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the questionable comments made in this article. I am not going to comment further; it just wouldn’t be constructive.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on October 20, 2016  7:35pm

I saw a blog on why people of color do not go into teaching. This is what some of them said.

People demonize teachers, chop away at the few financial perks of the profession, and label all public schools as failures.

I am a 31 year old loaded with debt from graduate school, barely making any money teaching a moderate-severe Special Education class (elementary), and abused by both parents and the school system.

I left after ten years. I was tired of parents who believed their child could do no wrong. I was tired of administrators and legislators who had no real understanding of what happens in a classroom and the politics it took to deal with them. I was tired of altering my lesson plans to teach to the standardized tests. I was tired of the shift to teaching children what to think instead of HOW to think. I was tired of working a second job to make ends meet. I was never tired of the children.I now work in an industry that, quite frankly, pays me over twice as much for doing far less work. My evenings and weekends, for the most part, are my own.

Just reading this. I wish the NAACP luck.

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on October 20, 2016  11:11pm

I find this statement by the mayor as being somewhat troublesome.  “When a student of color walks into a classroom and sees a teacher of color, a connection is likely to be made more readily and a student / teacher relationship can more quickly grow to become that between a student and a mentor. The ability to ‘identify’ with one another is the key in these interactions.” 

This statement suggests that black children will only come into feeling this “connection” providing the teacher is black only.  The face of this statement is repugnant in nature.  E.g., I had a third grade teacher named Mrs. Garber in which I felt towards her the very way described by the mayor, and she was white. 

Please don’t misconstrue my words, I’m certainly not opposed to the hiring of more black teachers.  However, there seems to be a hidden social subtext associated with the mayor’s statement.  The parsing of words does not a true leader spew.  White teachers have the same innate ability to love black students, create a tremendous learning environment and work overtime to teach their students to achieve just as much and sometimes even more than a black teacher.  Children know when genuine love is present in the room in spite of the ethnic makeup of the teacher.

That’s why I still can remember Mrs. Garber from K. A. Brennan school on Wilmot Rd.

posted by: Perspective on October 21, 2016  7:57am

“When a student of color walks into a classroom and sees a teacher of color, a connection is likely to be made more readily and a student / teacher relationship can more quickly grow to become that between a student and a mentor. The ability to ‘identify’ with one another is the key in these interactions.”

Imagine if the words “of color” with “non color” were replaced in this sentence. Would this be deemed appropriate in today’s society?  If the mayor of a predominantly non color community wanted non color teachers to fit this mold would that be okay?

posted by: SLP on October 21, 2016  8:15am

3/5, the blog post you quote explains why conscientious and talented people of ALL colors are either leaving or avoiding teaching careers. It’s a problem across the board.

posted by: JohnTulin on October 21, 2016  9:14am

“When a student of color walks into a classroom and sees a teacher of color, a connection is likely to be made more readily and a student / teacher relationship can more quickly grow to become that between a student and a mentor. The ability to ‘identify’ with one another is the key in these interactions.”

Simply not true.  Just more excuses.  A student or politician may say that it matters, doesn’t mean anything.  I’ve watched many of my amazing ‘colleagues of color’ just as disrespected and rendered ineffective by ‘students of color’ as any white teacher.  I’ve watched thoughtful and hardworking students of color make amazing connections with white teachers, which should be self-evident since the overwhelming majority of teachers in New Haven are white.  Are we to assume that 77% of teachers in New Haven can not connect 82% of the students based on skin color.  This is such a regressive an un-American way of thinking.  This white dude clashed with all his teachers, hated school, and all were white. 

By the way, what does ‘of color’ mean here anyway?  Can black kids only be taught by black teachers, Hispanics by Hispanics?  What about our Asians, Indians?  Can indigenous Mexicans possibly learn from a Spanish speaking Mexican? What if they classroom population doesn’t look just like the student, should we revert back to segregated schools so the student can ‘identify’ with their classmates?  Maybe the focus should be less on identity politics excuses and more on instilling the value of education and respect of all educators in all of our students, regardless of what the teacher looks like. 

This is simply more dogs and ponies, smoke and mirrors, more excuses.  All students deserve good teachers, that’s all that matters.

posted by: mikewestpark on October 21, 2016  9:23am

Shouldn’t we be hiring teachers based on their merit and the content of their character rather than their skin color?  By definition this is a racist policy.  We should be happy to get teachers of any color to teach our kids.  The position requires a master’s degree and is the lowest paying job in the country that requires a master’s.  Since as a society we have devalued education so much that we are willing to pay singers and athletes 100 times more than our teachers it is no wonder that we have a serious brain drain in this country.  Start paying teachers a base salary of 100k a year with benefits and you see the competition and quality of our teachers go way up.  Until then we won’t have the best and brightest teaching our kids regardless of the color of their skin.

posted by: anonymous on October 21, 2016  9:38am

Relatively speaking, New Haven may be doing pretty well at attracting and retaining teachers of color.  Compare to suburban schools surrounding New Haven, many of which are now well over 50% students of color yet have less than 5% teachers of color. These are the schools that desperately need to consider stepping up their efforts in this area.

posted by: fearless on October 21, 2016  9:45am

John Tulin. Exactly.  Students respond to teacher’s passion , skills and enthusiasm Kids need teachers who love their jobs and are comfortable in their own skin, regardless of color.  Hire good teachers. Don’t hire folks who can’t handle urban Ed, including Black folks   I have seen poor teachers in Bpt as an employee and in NH as a parent. Didn’t make a difference what color they were.  Let’s watch this Board and see if qualified passionate nonblack candidates are denied hire and positions remain open

posted by: newhavenlives on October 21, 2016  10:31am

Brian L. Jenkins,
Now that’s one impressive leap! To you, JohnTulin and others, when you are all done with the collective clutching of pearls and gross misinterpretation of the Mayor’s statement, you might want to talk to some actual education experts or read a bit about the benefits of matching students with race-congruent teachers. Reminds me of the folks who conveniently misinterpret “black lives matter” to mean that no other lives matter.

posted by: NHPS Teacher on October 21, 2016  10:56am

Did an earlier version of the article have a quote from Garth Harries mentioning Teach For America as a possible solution?  Why was it removed? 

I hope this crucial effort is not misappropriated by Relay.

Relay is money-motivated, not taught by experienced educators, and will reduce the quality of all teachers in New Haven.

[Ed.: This article never had that comment. Nothing was removed. Harries was asked about TFA at the press conference. He cautioned people not to see it as “the” solution to the challenge of finding black and Latino teachers. He said it could be part of a much broader strategy.]

posted by: theNEWnewhaven on October 21, 2016  11:54am

WOW. There are hundreds of teachers in the New Haven area looking for work and we decide it’s more important that the teacher we hire have a certain skin tone?

GIVING JOBS TO OUT OF STATE TEACHERS IS LIKE GIVING FACTORY JOBS TO OUT OF STATE WORKERS!

We are lowering the STANDARDS that we accept teachers to make sure we have minorities?

WHY would any parents want LOWER standards for their child’s teacher?

If you’re a student and are failing…maybe we should be looking at your home life first?

SHOULD we STOP adoptions of minority children to white families and give them to mediocre families of color instead?

If this was the other way around there would be protests and riots.

I would hate to be a white male in this school system right now. This is an embarrassment.

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on October 21, 2016  5:05pm

@ newhavenlives,

Allow me to ask you a question while “clutching my pearls.”  Should the white teachers only teach white students?  If your answer is no, then what is the brouhaha all about?

Our schools are failing, not solely because of the absence of black teachers.  Our schools are failing because we collectively have failed our kids.  Every school in every neighborhood should be opened for after school [evening] tutorial, there’s a failure.  All churches in the black community should have a Men’s Ministry component, there’s a failure.  The mayor is yet to understand the importance of creating a Youth Apprenticeship Program, there’s a failure.  Youth graduate from college and can’t acquire employment in there own city, there’s a failure. 

No, I don’t need to speak to an educator regarding your philosophy of the race congruent teaching concept.  Simply because I would rather counter your argument with the great work of the Ron Clark academy in Atlanta. 

If you want to hire more black teachers just say it.  If the numbers were flipped, what argument would you then use to hire more white teachers?

The vast majority of black children enter the school system already behind by a minimum of 10,000 vocabulary words.  Now whose fault is that?  Correct, the primary educators, parents.

And no, I did not “grossly misinterpret the mayors statement.”  The mayor’s statement is grossly ambivalent and inconsistent with her own conduct with respect to hiring and firing.  She allows Matt Nemerson to hire all white and Hispanic people, while receives his recommendation to fire ONLY black people.  No my friend, I didn’t misinterpret the mayor.  I now know the mayor extremely well.

Now I can put my “pearls” down.

posted by: Jill_the_Pill on October 21, 2016  9:43pm

” hope this crucial effort is not misappropriated by Relay”

Don’t you think getting Relay approved is precisely why the issue is being pushed to the forefront just now?

posted by: Mary Brown on October 22, 2016  7:45am

Most of my teachers were white when I was coming up. Most of them were good teachers! However I believe that having a diverse staff is important for the students to gain multiple perspectives and experiences and it is also important for the staff members who will make decisions that impact student learning every day! That person of color is a very evident example that students can succeed with hard work despite life challenges they may experience! Of all the teachers I’ve had the one teacher who impacted me most was an African American woman because she inspired me by discussing some of the challenges she experienced as an African American woman!

posted by: Intheknow on October 22, 2016  12:13pm

It’s not about lowering teaching standards, but it’s about CT getting on board with the rest of the country. You can be an amazing teacher with several years of experience in CA or even The Teacher of the Year, but if that teacher wanted to teach in CT that teacher would have to jump through hoops. In any profession, diversity of staff is a must because it benefits everyone. I had the luxury of having diverse teachers throughput my schooling and I know that I am richer because of that. The bottom line is that ALL teachers must be qualified, regardless of their skin tone.

posted by: rozzyteach on October 22, 2016  8:14pm

I am a white teacher teaching in New Haven. I, too, am very offended by Mayor Harp’s remarks. In the school I teach at I work alongside people of all colors and races. We ALL work very hard. We ALL were chosen for our jobs because we were the most qualified candidates NOT because of what color we were.  I may be white but I can relate to the lives of my students because I have struggled with many of the issues they are struggling with.  They do not relate to me because of my color but because I am there day in and day out. I have high expectations for all. In my classroom we care about each other, cheer each other on, learn together, fight at times, and learn the art of making up. My class is a happy place to be. Mayor Harp is welcome in my room any time. And then I would tell her the “real secret” for turning around NHPS (and every teacher knows what that magic is but no one ever asks us) and it would be to REDUCE CLASS SIZE!!! 27 students who need individualized attention, crowded together with little resources, in schools where teachers are overworked and stressed is THE problem holding NHPS students back from reaching their fullest potential.

posted by: Kathy B on October 22, 2016  9:22pm

While I have NO problem with recruiting teachers from diverse backgrounds, I take great offense at Mayor Harp’s comment: “When a student of color walks into a classroom and sees a teacher of color, a connection is likely to be made more readily,” I am a white female teacher who grew up in New Haven, and has been teaching in New Haven for 9 years. I make connections by getting to know my students, letting my students get to know me, and sharing with them that I am a product of NHPS, and attended the very school in which I now teach. Isn’t THAT the type of connections we want to make? Or do we want to regress and revert to connecting by the color of our skin?? Furthermore, to say “Retaining teachers is a challenge because of their salaries” speaks volumes; and yet what changes are in the works?? We are charged with educating, nurturing, and safeguarding our nations’ future (its children); and yet, we are treated like unprofessional, unskilled laborers. We are held to a standard like no other; and our responsibilities grow exponentially. We are held accountable for student performance on standardized tests, parental involvement in schools, student safety/well-being (mandated reporters of anything to the contrary); their social/emotional development and health, their well being outside of school (as well as in); their engagement in their learning, etc. Teachers (to my knowledge) are the only “professionals” who: work overtime for no compensation, provide resources/materials necessary to the performance of their job using their own money; are constantly engaged in professional development; use their prep periods and lunch breaks to tutor children, call parents, attend meetings, advocate for their students; and are evaluated based on the performance of others. This is the very rhetoric that causes teachers to leave! I welcome any politician, coordinator, Superintendant, etc. to “walk a mile in my shoes”-you will fail because I’ve taught my students to look PAST skin color

posted by: Kathy B on October 23, 2016  8:31am

Wow…I’m speechless (ok, who are we kidding?) Funny, I relate to my students by getting to know them and letting them get to know me (who btw, am a product of New Haven and the NHPS -through 8th grade). This is offensive on so many levels. But then again, maybe as a white teacher I can’t relate to Mayor Harp because…no, that’s not it at all. It’s probably the lack of knowledge and understanding of what we actually do every day, the challenges we face, and how we treat our children regardless of their color. I feel we should focus on recruiting teachers who are qualified, energetic, innovative thinkers and leaders. Then, the focus should be on retention of these teachers. We often recruit, hire, train, support only to lose many to more lucrative, less stressful positions. Bottom line: I was raised, raised my children, and teach my students to look past skin color and forge relationships based on common interests, character, and values. The Mayor’s comment takes us so far back in time; I sincerely hope none of my students see it.

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on October 23, 2016  11:52am

Hello out there!!

Has anyone heard from Newhavenlives?  If so, can you please tell him or her that I’m waiting for a retort to my questions. 

Further…

As the mayor arduously tries to appease the NAACP by making such an asinine statement, the hypocrisy in her posture lies with her firing the parents of these very children she references.

Is developing a “connection” more important than the parent’s ability to feed, clothe and maintain a roof over the heads of these kids?  Where’s the NAACP on that? 

This statement by the president of the school board is a huge indictment on all of the white teachers who show up everyday with love in their hearts; for all of their students regardless of ethnicity.  In my view, the mayor owes not only the white teachers an apology, but the black teachers as well who know that the educating of each student relies on a collective effort.  It is my hope that the mayor can develop a re-connection to thwart the schism she’s created by levying such a prosecution.

Enough of the photo ops immersed in conjecture.  The real issues are absent from the typical political discussions.  Meanwhile, our children are dying while groups like the NAACP seek to find an elected official or someone famous in which to present an award to at the next Freedom Fund dinner.

Perhaps the talented voices of WNHH can attempt to delve into some of the social issues germane to the youth in the city.  Because it sure isn’t coming from anywhere else.

posted by: truthheals on October 23, 2016  2:04pm

If Mayor Harp would leave education to the educators, we would all be better off. We voted her into office to run our city, not the Board of Education. Who ever heard of a mayor appointing herself as the president of the Board of Education. Our city has enough problems that needs her undivided attention.

Another thing - it is ridiculous that a teacher starts off earning $44,000 a year. Teaching is a full time job. Since our poor teachers are making such low salaries, they have no choice but to work part-time jobs outside of school to make ends meet. Mayor Harp has no empathy for our teachers. She does not have a background in educations and she needs to step aside and allow those that have the educational knowledge to make the decisions, along with our teachers, students and parents, on what is best for our schools.

If there is anyone that Mayor Harp will listen to, please plead with her to leave our educational system to the educators.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on October 23, 2016  2:46pm

My bad. I forgot. This is sounding like shades of what happen in 1968 in Ocean Hill–Brownsville when the New York City teachers’ went on strike.

The New York City teachers’ strike of 1968 was a months-long confrontation between the new community-controlled school board in the largely black Ocean Hill–Brownsville neighborhoods of Brooklyn, and New York City’s United Federation of Teachers. The strike dragged on from May 1968 to November 1968, shutting down the public schools for a total of 36 days and increasing racial tensions between Blacks and Jews.Thousands of New York City teachers went on strike in 1968 when the school board of the neighborhood, which is now two separate neighborhoods, abruptly dismissed a set of teachers and administrators. The newly created school district, in a mostly black neighborhood, was an experiment in community control over schools—the dismissed workers were almost all white and Jewish.In the New York City school system, regulated by a civil service examination, only 8% of teachers and 3% of administrators were Black.[24] Following Brown v. Board, 4000 students in Ocean Hill–Brownsville were bused to white schools, where they complained of mistreatment.[25] Faith in the controllers of the school system was sinking lower and lower.[26]Bolstered by the civil rights movement, but frustrated by resistance to desegregation, African Americans began to demand authority over the schools in which their children were educated. The ATA called for community-controlled schools, educating with a “Black value system” that emphasized “unity” and “collective work and responsibility” (as opposed to the “middle class” value of “individualism).[19] Leftist white allies, including teachers from the recently eclipsed Teachers Union, supported these demands.[27]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_teachers’_strike_of_1968

posted by: NHInsider on October 23, 2016  9:29pm

In a day and age where the acceptance of racial diversity is so critical, I find this ‘effort’ to be completely counterproductive to achieving that goal. The City is going to spend money it does not have (nor is it openly disclosing the cost of this endeavor) to bring ‘newbie’ teachers up from the South based upon their race???  Even if there is a ‘length of stay’ clause, they will all run to the suburbs as soon as their required time of service is completed.  I would love to see what research the NHBOE utilized to justify that Black or Latino children can only respect and learn from teachers of their respective race.  New Haven loses a record number of quality teacher every year, not because of ‘racial divide’ between teacher and student, but because of the immense lack of resources (teachers in New Haven spend ludicrous amounts of money per year to provide basic supplies for their students), a systematic lack of support from the District in dealing with behavior management, the lack of meaningful teacher training opportunities, and the overall feeling of discord among all employees of the NHBOE.  Teacher morale is at an all time low,especially in neighborhood schools (Magnets get more funding and can provide a better environment for teachers).  These ‘strategies’, especially with a lame duck Superintendent, should be suspended until a true leader is put into place, and the tax payers of New Haven have seen the research and funding sources that prove this is ‘good practice’.

posted by: truthheals on October 24, 2016  2:29pm

NHInsider:
“I would like to see what research the NHBOE utilized to justify that Black or Latino children can only respect and learn from teachers of their respective race.”

Please know that statement was the sentiment of Mayor Toni Harp, not the NHBOE. She should not continue to speak on behalf of the Board without coming to a consensus with them before speaking to the public. At Board meetings, the members have frequently stated that they are looking for the most qualified teachers to work with our students, not skin color. Any public comment should come from the BOE as a whole, not from Mayor/President. This is ONE of the reasons why Mayor Harp should remove herself as President of the BOE. She seems to think that her position as Mayor allows her to speak on her own and not for the full Board. As far as utilizing research on this or other matter, Mayor Harp seems to think that she can do or say anything that she pleases. She seems to think that we, as citizens of New Haven, should just sit back and allow her to rule. The chaos on the Board is because of her leadership. When she decides to allow the educators to lead the Board of Ed, I know that we will see a POSITIVE difference.

posted by: theyareallmykids on October 24, 2016  7:22pm

As a New Haven Educator I do not see my students for their ethnicity; I see them for their heart, their determination and their potential. They do not see my ethnicity as a barrier when they come to school in tears and run to me for a hug. I don;t see their ethnicity when I do home visits to get my kids to school, to bring them food and furniture, to make sure they have clothes and resources. I see them as my family and family takes care of each other.

How will this effect our equity in the district? Pipeline applicants will get special certification exceptions that none of our state based teachers will get - no matter their ethnicity.

Our mayor needs to go back to her office and get off the board of education. She is out of her depth and to make comments about people of color she is showing that maybe the racist we have to worry about is the one currently occupying the mayor’s office- not a teacher’s classroom.

posted by: newhavenlives on October 25, 2016  10:27am

Mr. Jenkins:
Should the white teachers only teach white students? 
[I don’t follow your point; nowhere in the article does it say ONLY black teachers should teach black students; therefore, I don’t know what you are attempting to counter] 

Our schools are failing, not solely because of the absence of black teachers.
[Exactly who made the point that schools were failing SOLELY because of the absence of black teachers?]

Our schools are failing because we collectively have failed our kids.  Every school in every neighborhood should be opened for after school [evening] tutorial, there’s a failure.  All churches in the black community should have a Men’s Ministry component, there’s a failure.  The mayor is yet to understand the importance of creating a Youth Apprenticeship Program, there’s a failure.  Youth graduate from college and can’t acquire employment in there own city, there’s a failure.

[uhmm, OK, agreed in some respects; But, I am not sure the article and those interviewed intended to address every single ill affecting NH black kids]

Simply because I would rather counter your argument with the great work of the Ron Clark academy in Atlanta.

[No, Mr. Jenkins, by highlighting the Ron Clark academy you are unwittingly supporting my point. When you are done watching the Ron Clark dance videos and trolling the comments section of the NHI, you might want to educate yourself about the folks who stand in front of the students at RCA everyday. I am not attributing the success of the school to the fact that it appears that over 70% of their teachers are black, because I don’t know much about the school, but just want to highlight your ability to raise these feckless “counter arguments”].

If you want to hire more black teachers just say it.  If the numbers were flipped, what argument would you then use to hire more white teachers? 

[Is this what they call straw-manning? Seriously, Mr. Jenkins, do you think there will ever be a flip in our lifetime?]

posted by: newhavenlives on October 25, 2016  10:33am

Part 2 & Final

“And no, I did not “grossly misinterpret the mayors statement.”  The mayor’s statement is grossly ambivalent and inconsistent with her own conduct with respect to hiring and firing.  She allows Matt Nemerson to hire all white and Hispanic people, while receives his recommendation to fire ONLY black people.  No my friend, I didn’t misinterpret the mayor.  I now know the mayor extremely well.”

[Half the people she fired should not have been hired in the first place; she is clearly lacking judgment in that regard; are you intimating that she should have supported some of them because they were black? If so, I am so confused, but but not surprised, by your inconsistency Mr. Jenkins]

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on October 25, 2016  1:58pm

@ Newhavenlives,

Back from vacation I see…

“[I don’t follow your point; nowhere in the article does it say ONLY black teachers should teach black students; therefore, I don’t know what you are attempting to counter]”

Res…The thrust of the argument is to recruit more black teachers to better identify with the educational plight of the black student body.  I didn’t create the underlying argument, the mayor did. 

“[Exactly who made the point that schools were failing SOLELY because of the absence of black teachers?]” 

Res… I don’t know, you tell me? Because this is what I said - Our schools are failing, NOT solely because of the absence of black teachers.

“[uhmm, OK, agreed in some respects; But, I am not sure the article and those interviewed intended to address every single ill affecting NH black kids]”

Res… Nor did I.

“[No, Mr. Jenkins, by highlighting the Ron Clark academy you are unwittingly supporting my point.”

Res… No, I in no way am supporting your point.  Ron Clark was a WHITE idealistic fella who chose to teach in New York and made a remarkable difference in the lives of his mostly BLACK students.  His story substantiates my point.

Res… Of course my arguments are “feckless” to you.  Please don’t blame me because of your cognitive inability and lack of capacity to grasp the depth of my point. 

“[Is this what they call straw-manning? Seriously, Mr. Jenkins, do you think there will ever be a flip in our lifetime?]”

Res… At the rate the city is experiencing gentrification, I’m not sure.

“[Half the people she fired should not have been hired in the first place; she is clearly lacking judgment in that regard; are you intimating that she should have supported some of them because they were black? If so, I am so confused, but but not surprised, by your inconsistency Mr. Jenkins]”

Res… Nice try, but you’re not dealing with a dummy.  No one baits me.  I intimate nothing, I say exactly what I mean, period.