Read Their Resumes

One candidate knows how to run a large urban school system that seeks change. One candidate knows how to build up the talent within a system. One candidate knows the Elm City. They are the three left standing in the question to become New Haven’s next superintendent.

Those defining pitches emerged from a 57-page packet of materials submitted by the three finalists applying to head New Haven Public Schools. The three candidates — Carol Birks, Pamela Brown and Gary Highsmith — emerged from a fitful and divisive nationwide search that scared away some leading candidates.

The school system has been without a permanent superintendent for more than a year, after the board pushed out Garth Harries in October 2016. Former Superintendent Reggie Mayo came out of retirement to lead the district in an interim capacity. The Board of Education is expected to finally pick a replacement this coming Monday, Nov. 20.

But before that, the candidates will answer questions from Student Council members this morning at Metro Business Academy, then speak to the general public at Betsy Ross Magnet School’s auditorium, at 150 Kimberly Ave., from 5:30-9 p.m.

Click on the links to download copies of the full applications for Birks, Brown and Gary Highsmith.

Following a preview of how the finalists are presenting themselves.

Carol Birks

Birks presented herself as a coach who has learned how to educate urban youth and promote leaders throughout the faculty.

“Who would have thought that a young African American girl who grew up the youngest of four in blighted conditions in the East End of Bridgeport, CT, to a mother, a domestic worker, and father, a mechanic, both with very little formal education, would be eligible to pursue such an influential position as superintendent of New Haven Public Schools?” she wrote.

Birks has worked as chief of staff for Hartford Public Schools since being promoted this July. Birks has responsibility for overseeing administrative services, like labor relations for the 4,000-member staff; assisting with the $417 million budget; and leading a $100 million project to co-locate three academies in a renovated building. The job pays a $170,000 salary.

Previously, as Hartford’s assistant superintendent for four years, Birks developed a training academy to support the growth of principals and administrators — a move that Beth Schiavino-Narvaez, Hartford’s superintendent, credited with for boosting the district’s talent pool.

The central office team is “moving from a transactional Human Resources Department to a department that builds capacity for school leaders and teachers,” the superintendent wrote. ”One of her strengths includes recognizing individuals’ strengths and developing individualized leadership plans to build their capacity.”

Schiavino-Narvaez continued: “Throughout her tenure, there has been some progress in improving academic outcomes, reducing chronic absence rates, and discipline rates. She has also worked tirelessly to improve graduation rates across the district.”

A graduate of Harding High School in Bridgeport, Birks collected degrees from Hampton University in Virginia, University of Bridgeport and the University of Connecticut.

Birks started out her education career in 1996 as a seventh-grade language arts teacher at Luis Munoz Marin School in Bridgeport, before working for the state to administer GEAR UP, a federal program to boost college-going among low-income students.

She became an assistant principal at Hamden High School in 2003 and was eventually recruited to head up her alma mater. In 2010, after three years as principal at Harding, a consultant hired to restructure the school replaced her, saying there was “not enough cohesiveness in her action plans to improve student achievement.” She took a two-year job with Global Partnership Schools and a one-year gig with CT Center for School Change.

Birks completed a doctorate from Columbia University Teachers College in 2013, where she focused on strategies for reaching young men of color. Her research led her to support single-sex education with a culturally relevant curriculum — a proposition similar to Rev. Boise Kimber’s proposed all-boys school, which New Haven’s Board of Education shot down this year.

Pamela Brown

In her application, Brown argued that tenets of New Haven’s “School Change 2.0” reform plan are strategies she has implemented at the helm of other school districts, including in the top job.

From 2012 to 2014, Brown led Buffalo Public Schools as superintendent. During her tenure, she said she oversaw the final phase of a $1.4 billion renovation project, sped the process for getting school improvement grants from the state, and added a data dashboard and parent portal to offer real-time updates on student progress. She also claimed to have notched high numbers: a nine-point increase in the four-year graduation rate, the largest among New York’s big-city districts in her first year; a 66 percent college enrollment rate, the highest level in the district’s history; a dramatic increase in the number of schools that passed standardized tests, up to 44 of 53 eligible schools; and a reversal in a trend of declining enrollment rates.

Her reforms also made her a lightning-rod for criticism, particularly for hiring administrators who lacked the proper certifications.

Carl Paladino, a real estate developer and Tea Partier who lost a gubernatorial race and chaired Donald Trump’s campaign in New York, led the crusade against her. In his first motion as a newly elected school board member in 2013, he demanded her resignation. “The BOE wanted a weak African-American Superintendent from out of State who they could control to protect their influence over the bloated budget and jobs,” he wrote in an open letter, explaining his rationale. “If they were true to the children, they would have hired the best proven and capable person, regardless of color.”

John King, then New York State’s education commissioner, also criticized Brown’s handling of turnaround efforts at two low-performing high schools and a deal with a teachers union about evaluations.

In a recommendation letter, Barbara Seals Nevergold, the Buffalo Board of Education’s current president, called Brown an “extraordinary educator.” Nevergold said Brown confronted “academic, financial and political distress,” as soon as she started, “allowing little time for an orientation to this complex, dynamic position.” Still, she added, Brown had a lengthy list of accomplishments from her short tenure.

“Dr. Brown is a professional, who has maintained ultimate professional demeanor in the face of numerous professional and personal challenges. She has a calm demeanor but she is forthright and direct in her communication style,” she went on. “Dr. Brown has the ability to make the difficult, unpopular decisions that had to be made to move our District forward.”

After accepting a buyout before a new school board took power, Brown landed in Fontana, a city on the eastern outskirts of Los Angeles, where she manages 30 elementary schools. In the last three years, Brown has experimented with new models, piloting a full-day kindergarten and rolling out the first phase of a dual-language immersion program that’s has swelled interest around one magnet school, leading to a wait-list that runs hundreds of names long.

Brown’s also upped the average attendance rates to 96 percent, and her plan for engaging families led to 5,000 additional sign-ups for education and engagement opportunities, plus the founding of two parent leadership groups. That job pays $174,000 — a cut from the $232,500 she pulled as Buffalo’s superintendent.

After graduating from Compton Senior High School in Southern California, Brown earned degrees from Stanford, San Francisco State and Harvard. She also earned a license to teach Spanish from the University of Southern California, which she used in her first job as a bilingual teacher in Los Angeles.

Brown has worked in Clark County Schools in Las Vegas, Nev.; San Francisco Unified School District; Creighton School District in Phoenix, Ariz.; Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools in Charlotte, N.C.; Richmond City Public Schools; and the School District of Philadelphia.

Gary Highsmith

Deemed unqualified by an executive search firm, Highsmith lacks a doctoral degree and can’t speak another language besides English. But, he notes in his application, he knows New Haven better than anyone else.

“I have been preparing for this position for nearly three decades,” he wrote. “It is abundantly clear that I am uniquely qualified for the position of Superintendent of New Haven Public Schools. I was born and raised in New Haven, attended public schools from Head Start through high school in New Haven, I still live in New Haven, my children have both attended New Haven Public Schools since pre-school and kindergarten, [and] I worked in New Haven Public Schools for 16 years…. One would be hard-pressed to find a candidate more invested in and knowledgeable about New Haven Public Schools than me.”

Since 2015, Highsmith has worked as the human resources director for Hamden Public Schools, overseeing 1,100 staff. He said he’s increased the number of minority teachers, revised the district’s sexual harassment policy, saved $800,000 in salaries through an early retirement incentive and attrition, and successfully negotiated multiple collective bargaining agreements with the unions. The job netted him $175,000 last year.

A letter from Jody Ian Goeler, Hamden’s superintendent, strongly supported Highsmith’s “logical” return to the Elm City. “Over his more than two decades as a certified educator in the State of Connecticut, Gary has acquired the skills, dispositions and experience to effectively lead any Connecticut school district,” he wrote. “Gary represents a new generation of district leaders who possess the drive, skills, charisma, passion and out-of-the-box thinking necessary to bring about the types of changes needed in education today.”

Highsmith picked up two degrees and an administrative certificate from Southern Connecticut State University.

He entered the school system in 1990 as a substance abuse prevention coordinator, developing a curriculum and guest-lecturing for high school upperclassmen until 1995, when he became a social studies teacher at Troup Middle School. In 2002, he took a four-year job as principal at L.W. Beecher Elementary School, where he developed a behavior code that he said reduced out-of-school suspensions.

From 2006 to 2015, as principal at Hamden High School, Highsmith said he raised graduation rates by 10 points — a slightly inflated figure, according to state data, that mixed four-year and five-year graduation rates.

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posted by: Owlette on November 14, 2017  8:18am

I am curious to see the advocacy from the board members who stand by Highsmith! Nothing personal but our Elm City Candidate is the least qualified candidate. Our school system can not afford a superintendent who is not coming in with enough experience…

Parents and Community PLEASE show up tonight our voices need to be heard! 

The BOARD MEMBERS need to do what is right for our children!  TRANSPARENCY!!!!!!!!!

KEEP THE POLITICS AWAY FROM THIS PROCESS!!! Remember everything comes to the light sooner than later!!!!!!!!

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on November 14, 2017  8:38am

posted by: Owlette on November 14, 2017 8:18am

I am curious to see the advocacy from the board members who stand by Highsmith! Nothing personal but our Elm City Candidate is the least qualified candidate. Our school system can not afford a superintendent who is not coming in with enough experience…

How about the board members who are pushing for Carol Birks.

posted by: watchfuleye on November 14, 2017  8:46am

HMMM.. I am reading the Resumes and I read the applications. I wonder why when it came to Gary Highsmith they put “claim” for his accomplishments. But not for any other candidate. Everyone really should just stick to information and not try to sway people one way or another. We could probably pick apart each candidate in some way some how. Read the information about them. Come to the Public forum and then decide. For me I don’t know who my best pick would be. I say that because One candidate application seem very transactional no personal connection at all. This is only one thing out of many that is important to me, because I am looking at how will you deal with student concerns, teacher, staff and parents. However tonight I will witness how they respond.

posted by: Flunky on November 14, 2017  9:04am

Highsmith is for ONE part of New Haven, we have many needy neighborhoods and students. I hope they post the video of the forums, as they did last time, so we can see for ourselves. As detailed in the NHR article today and Thur, this process is a mess.

posted by: watchfuleye on November 14, 2017  9:22am

@Flunky what part of New Haven is Highsmith all for? You mention he is for ONE part of New Haven? I don’t really know this man or any of the candidates. I hope the forums are recorded however I will be there in the flesh to see for myself. However no matter what we feel we have to hope the Board will make the right choice. I personally don’t feel that optimistic about it only because this search process I feel was not done correctly and the search firm did not care, why? because they did NOT have enough data to produce, and basically didn’t care either. How I know because I ASKED!! If they would have had more forums in the beginning would the ideal candidate look differently and I was told YES!!! I also asked why move forward without enough data—-crickets with that question.. and they had already received a portion of there money the search firm I asked that and that was confirmed by the search firm McCormick Guy.

posted by: Owlette on November 14, 2017  9:41am

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on November 14, 2017 8:38am

How about the board members who are pushing for Carol Birks.

What about them? It will give me as a parent a small sense of relief that board members are trying to find a qualified candidate. However, I haven’t witnessed any board members pushing for her like I have witnessed the Highsmith entourage!!!

Anyway, by reading the resumes I do see a candidate that sticks out more than the other 2 can’t wait to meet them tonight and hear them out. I hope to see a nice turn out tonight! The only personal agenda I have is for my children to get the proper education they deserve and sadly that should be everyone’s agenda!  TRANSPARENCY!!!! TRANSPARENCY!!!! TRANSPARENCY!!!!  STOP THE POLITICS.

posted by: GroveStreet on November 14, 2017  10:20am

Last time the board chose a superintendent, it was the least qualified, but the most inside. And it was an absolute disaster.

Looks like they are about to travel down the same stupid road to the detriment of the city, the students and the families.

Can we please get a reasonable qualified candidate for mayor so that we can bring an end to this disaster of an administration? It is quite clear that her personal allegiances and concerns are far more important to her than the benefit of the whole city.

posted by: watchfuleye on November 14, 2017  10:26am

Who are the Board Members pushing for? I don’t know. and if anyone does for what reasons? Please SHARE!! I also wonder will the board show up tonight to witness how the community and the candidates perform. They haven’t been to any community forums yet. and this is why I wonder if our opinions even matter. I am hoping for the best and the best candidate.

posted by: BetweenTwoRocks on November 14, 2017  10:29am

Reading these resumes, I am most impressed by Pamela Brown. It sounds much like New Haven, she came into a very difficult situation in Buffalo and still did her best to manage all of the competing interests, including experimenting with new techniques, while some racist Tea Partier apparently decided that the only reason she got the job is because she isn’t white (oh the irony).

Birks also sounds pretty good and the fancy Columbia degree can’t hurt, nor could the focus on education young black men. I can’t speak to the current state of the Hartford public school system or her influence on it.

Highsmith’s qualifications certainly seem a little sparse here. While being a lifelong New Haven resident is great—and we should continue to hear these voices—does it make you qualified to actually run an entire school system? I have no idea.

It sounds like the City is pushing for Highsmith, but this article at least makes him sound less qualified. But I’m even less qualified to have an opinion, so.

I don’t have any kids in the system, but I hope New Haven makes the best choice moving forward, whatever it is, and with any luck, we can put this chaotic process behind us and move forward as a city.

Good luck to all those involved.

posted by: ElmCityVoice on November 14, 2017  10:34am

Gary Highsmith’s resume won’t download. Has anyone else had this problem?

posted by: westville man on November 14, 2017  11:00am

watchfuleye-  very good questions.. Glad you are going tonite.  Listen carefully.  The politics were in on this long before Gary Highsmith was included in the final group.
Unfortunately,  I cannot speak more frankly than that but I can say the fix WAS in but got blocked, thankfully.  Behind the scenes there were those who stood to make out financially if the selection process went unchecked.  To the people want to hate on Gary because of his association with Mike Jefferson and Kerm Carolina-  these are 2 men who’ve done more for New Haven than any of the posters here, including you and me.

posted by: watchfuleye on November 14, 2017  11:02am

no.. all candidates applications can download

posted by: nhv1 on November 14, 2017  11:54am

While Dr. Brown’s resume is loaded, it looks like if she gets offered a better position with more pay then she will be gone in a year or two. I don’t want to go through another superintendent search in a year or two especially with this school board. Dr. Birks is from Bridgeport and Hartford. Are those the districts that NHPS need to be emulating? While Mr. Highsmith is not the perfect candidate, he knows the district as a principal, assistant principal, parent, and student. I would rather have someone who knows and is committed to the district instead of having someone who will leave in a year or two for higher pay and more clout.

posted by: watchfuleye on November 14, 2017  12:14pm

@NHV1 Great Points I never thought of it that way. This is true I surely don’t want to go through this craziness again. Pick the right one and the one who will STAY!! We shall soon all see. One thing is for sure whoever was bad mouthing any of the candidates which is wrong I bet whoever earns the opportunity them same people will try to be “BUDDY” AND “SUCKING” up.. where I come from that’s called “PHONY and FAKE”

posted by: Owlette on November 14, 2017  12:37pm

posted by: nhv1 on November 14, 2017 11:54am

While Dr. Brown’s resume is loaded, it looks like if she gets offered a better position with more pay then she will be gone in a year or two. I don’t want to go through another superintendent search in a year or two especially with this school board. Dr. Birks is from Bridgeport and Hartford. Are those the districts that NHPS need to be emulating? While Mr. Highsmith is not the perfect candidate, he knows the district as a principal, assistant principal, parent, and student. I would rather have someone who knows and is committed to the district instead of having someone who will leave in a year or two for higher pay and more clout.

Being from New Haven or being a principal is not enough to run a school district, although I respect and admire all of Highsmith’s accomplishments I do not believe this is a time to gamble with someone who is not qualified to run our district. We cannot make a decision on what will happen in the candidate’s future job endeavors… come on now let’s be realistic….if we are drawing this conclusion any of the candidates would be willing to leave for higher pay and more clout! DUH! 

PS: Dr. Garcia Blocker and Dr. Tracey are committed to the district and they didn’t make the cut!!!!! Highsmith needs a little more cooking in the experience department!!!!!! If the board members don’t see that, then we are in big trouble with the politics on this board!!! Something will have to change with this BOARD sooner than later!!!!!!

posted by: GroveStreet on November 14, 2017  1:26pm

What does “commitment” mean? Hard working people are always committed, but that doesn’t mean that they are the right person for a job. So much more to it.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on November 14, 2017  1:57pm

posted by: Owlette on November 14, 2017 9:41am

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on November 14, 2017 8:38am

How about the board members who are pushing for Carol Birks.

What about them? It will give me as a parent a small sense of relief that board members are trying to find a qualified candidate. However, I haven’t witnessed any board members pushing for her like I have witnessed the Highsmith entourage!!!

Tell me which Board board members pushing are pushing for Highsmith?

posted by: SLP on November 14, 2017  2:41pm

Very interesting to read those three applications and their references. Can’t wait to hear how the meet-and-greets go.

Brown’s application, while impressive in many ways, is dripping with educational jargon and almost completely generic, implying she is casting her net for multiple superintendent positions and failing to indicate why New Haven in particular means anything to her.

Birks’ application is also impressive but also jargon-heavy. Still, it’s more concrete and her writing is more personal. Her interest in this particular job is more evident, and she made a point of including local references that mention and are specific to New Haven.

Highsmith’s application was submitted 2 months before Brown’s or Birks’, and is clear, to the point, and New Haven-focused all the way. The reference from Burt Saxon alone is a gem: “Gary ... believes the primary purpose of schools is academic instruction. As principal, Gary spent a great deal of his time in classrooms trying to improve academic instruction. Hard-working, dedicated teachers appreciated his assistance. Those trying to coast did not.” Boy, could NHPS use more of THAT.

Highsmith’s resume is unquestionably less impressive than Brown’s or Birks’, though his career path is practical, appropriate, and logical. (One of the saddest developments in public education is the misguided worship of the Ph.D. in education.)

The internal/local candidate is not necessarily the best, especially in a tangled system like New Haven’s. Furthermore, Highsmith is smart and savvy but often comes off as dismissive and arrogant. Still, notwithstanding self-aggrandizing boners like “It is abundantly clear why I am uniquely qualified,” I’m starting to understand better why so many support him.

I look forward to learning about the candidates’ interactions with the public.

posted by: NataliyaBraginsky on November 14, 2017  2:44pm

The bias in this article is concerning.  It seems clear that the author of this article and the New Haven Independent are biased against Gary Highsmith.  The section on Highsmith leads with several negative points, while the other two candidates’ sections lead with the positive.  The fact that Highsmith does not speak a language other than English is centered, while Birks’ inability to speak any language other than English goes unmentioned.  Highsmith’s data on raising graduation rates in Hamden are questioned but the doubt is not clearly explained.  Meanwhile, several self-reported and questionable claims by Birks and Brown go unchecked. With this search process nearing its close and public perception of the candidates being so critical in this moment, the bias in this article seems like a violation of journalistic ethics, one that could have significant impacts on the decision for who will become our next superintendent.

posted by: watchfuleye on November 14, 2017  2:58pm

The article is very bias and not just remaining facts driven. Tonight let’s all come back and give our opinions then after we see how they all act and treat the public.. keep a look out for fake and phony responses and body language

posted by: JohnTulin on November 14, 2017  3:01pm

Highsmith might be as awesome as his fans say he is, but New Haven needs an outsider to clean up its mess - to lead the NHPS and the City overall.

posted by: Owlette on November 14, 2017  4:03pm

posted by: watchfuleye on November 14, 2017 2:58pm

The article is very bias and not just remaining facts driven. Tonight let’s all come back and give our opinions then after we see how they all act and treat the public.. keep a look out for fake and phony responses and body language

We all know Highsmith is good with the public so how is this supposed to make such an impact on how he runs a whole school system that is in dire need of fixing? By the way we are already used to fake phony responses and body language by the mayor of New Haven and she got voted back in!

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on November 14, 2017 1:57pm
Tell me which Board board members pushing are pushing for Highsmith?
Please tell me this is a rhetorical question, don’t play with my intelligence!!! We all know the answer to that. My 5 year old can answer it seeing he unfortunately has to sit at board meetings with me.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on November 14, 2017  5:02pm

posted by: Owlette on November 14, 2017 4:03pm

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on November 14, 2017 1:57pm
Tell me which Board board members pushing are pushing for Highsmith?
Please tell me this is a rhetorical question, don’t play with my intelligence!!! We all know the answer to that. My 5 year old can answer it seeing he unfortunately has to sit at board meetings with me.

I said Tell me which Board board members pushing are pushing for Highsmith?This is not playing with your intelligence.This is a question to you. What makes you think we all know the answer to that. I am pushing Gary High Smith and I am not on the board.

posted by: Acer on November 14, 2017  9:56pm

Mr. Highsmith seems to have many wonderful attributes. He is an accomplished teacher, principal, and administrator. I have no doubt that he is a good person and caring family man. He is however not ready to be the superintendent of an entire school system, including NHPS. He is simply is under experienced and under qualified. His time to run a school system may come in the future, but it is not now and it should not be New Haven.

posted by: watchfuleye on November 15, 2017  8:29am

Good Morning Community!! What is the verdict now? What are your thoughts if anyone attended the Community Forum?

posted by: Flunky on November 15, 2017  9:04am

The forum was embarrassing. Signs, cheering sections, straw polls and busing in students are for student council elections and pep rallies, not for a serious CEO position overseeing over 3000 employees. If New Haven wants a personality cult person, it certainly has choices…

posted by: Owlette on November 15, 2017  9:16am

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on November 14, 2017 5:02pm
I said Tell me which Board board members pushing are pushing for Highsmith?This is not playing with your intelligence.This is a question to you. What makes you think we all know the answer to that. I am pushing Gary High Smith and I am not on the board.
Attend more meetings and you could answer this question. My apologies but I will refrain from giving you the answer, do your homework as I did. Also, I don’t operate well when addressed in a sarcastic and condescending tone(for future reference). MOVING ON
After attending last nights forum I was sitting in the audience wondering why there wasn’t a more diverse group of candidates. Our school system is made up of a beautiful diverse group of children, staff, and community. When I hear the notion that if you are from New Haven you know your people makes me cringe (That is so cliché). I live in New Haven and if I had to take a shot at visiting all the schools I would need a GPS, especially since we have New Haven schools that are not even in New Haven. Also, the lack of parents made me very sad and opened my eyes to why the politics override the right choices. It was shameful that the meeting was not well advertised and organized in a way that the public could ask the questions. This was supposed to be our forum not scripted and robotic. Seeing that the Citywide Parent Team took the lead on this forum I am disappointed that they did not advertise and promote this meeting effectively to increase a more diverse representation of the parent and student population. ONE robo-call is not the answer. The audience was composed of Highsmith, and Birks cheerleaders which made me respect and appreciate Dr. Brown even more than her resume. She composed herself extremely professional and shined all on her own. Highsmith, impressed me with many points but I still feel he is not ready for this position. Birks bombed with her charter alliance and data reference, this X her right out.

posted by: Anonymous Bosh on November 15, 2017  9:35am

Birks, IMO, looks to be the most “loyal.” (Hometown girl makes good.)
I would worry whether Brown would stay put (plus… Buffalo? Yikes! *Not* a success story).
Highsmith seems a union man (e.g., anti-Charter) and a bureaucrat (versus a “champion.”) Also, the “Hire My Dad” emotional appeal is telling (“No, honey, please don’t bring the sign; that would be inappropriate…”)
All the above is my (rather uninformed) opinion.

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on November 15, 2017  9:42am

It amazes me to hear people talk about how Mr. Highsmith is “not ready.”  Andrew Young said the same thing about Barack Obama. 

I haven’t always agreed with Gary in the past; and certainly he seldom if ever agreed with me.  However, because his written accomplishments are somewhat insufficient (some think) in comparison to his rivals, doesn’t in no way make him less qualified.  This young man is brilliant.  Moreover, he understands the New Haven student from Head Start to High School in ways that his rivals would never.

Harries had an impressive resume also, but look at the massive debt he left the children with. 

Additionally, this notion that his friends Kermit Carolina and Michael Jefferson may benefit from his being the superintendent is shameful.  Why include them as fodder to try and sully Mr. Highsmith? Where were these comments when Harries was superintendent?  He hired friends from all across America and no one uttered a word.  If both Michael and Kermit meet the necessary criteria, then they should be considered like everyone else.  In fact, if my friends did I world.  And everyone would also. 

Finally, this trio of impressive leaders has always been opposed to me politically.  But I never took it personal.  This is about children and Gary Highsmith is more than qualified.  I challenge this board to do the right thing and hire Mr. Highsmith who’s [earned] the right to be my grandchildren’s next Superintendent of Schools for the City of New Haven.

posted by: elmcityresident on November 15, 2017  9:54am

MY VOTE IS FOR HIGHSMITH KNOWN HIM THROUGHT THE SCHOOL SYSTEM FOR 25 YEARS HE’S ALWAYS BEEN ABOUT THE KIDS AND FOR THE KIDS NOT TO MENTION HE NEVER TO GOOD TO SPEAK TO YOU IN PUBLIC WHERE EVER HE SEES YOU.

#GOHIGHSMITH

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on November 15, 2017  4:51pm

posted by: Owlette on November 15, 2017 9:16am

Attend more meetings and you could answer this question. My apologies but I will refrain from giving you the answer, do your homework as I did. Also, I don’t operate well when addressed in a sarcastic and condescending tone(for future reference). MOVING ON

How do you know I have not gone to meetings?You put the statement out therer words which was I am curious to see the advocacy from the board members who stand by Highsmith! I rest my case.