Armed With Tourniquet, Cop Saves A Life

Paul Bass PhotosOfficer Gregory Dash saw bright red blood flowing from the leg of a shot man on a Newhallville porch. So he reached to the left side of his duty belt to retrieve the police department’s latest weapon of choice.

The “weapon” was a tourniquet. The department has in recent weeks outfitted all its cops with the tourniquets and trained them in how to use them.

Just in time for the 20-year-old man who was fading in and out of consciousness on the Shelton Avenue porch around 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Dash was one of the first officers at the scene. He and his partner Paul Nakos had been blocks away, near Goffe and Orchard, seeking a silver car believed to be connected to a shooting that had happened minutes earlier when they heard a report on the police radio about three people hit by bullets on Shelton Avenue.

So they hurried over. They found one cop, Sgt. Brendan Borer, on the scene, surrounded by 20 other people.

Dash looked at the porch. Two, not three, young men had been hit by bullets.

Dash, a 27-year-old officer who served as a medic in the National Guard before becoming a New Haven cop in 2016, slipped into “visual triage” mode.

“When you go to a shooting scene,” he said, “you try to balance the law enforcement [role] with being able to ID who needs help right away.”

He noticed that one of the gunshot victims, a 19-year-old man, was alert, sitting up, talking. He’d been hit in the ankle.

He saw the second man — who would turn out to be the first victim’s older brother — “lying on his back in a pretty large pool of blood, in and out of it. Not really talking.” That man, clearly, was Dash’s “immediate patient.”

Firefighters arrived. One exposed the bullet wound on the victim’s right upper thigh. Smoke poured out from it in the cold.

Dash recognized the bright red color as a sign that it was “an arterial bleed.” Meaning: “You have only minutes until you bleed out or die.”

The doctors at Yale-New Haven’s emergency department do miracles keeping gunshot victims alive, Dash knew — if the cops and firefighters and ambulance crews can get the victims there in time.

On Shelton Avenue, Dash told Sgt. Borer, “He’s going to die if he doesn’t have a tourniquet.”

Elm Street Lesson

It just so happened that New Haven has been training officers for moments like this one, under a new policy.

The policy grew out of a review of an incident in September 2017, when a barricaded gunman shot two cops on Elm Street. Paramedics couldn’t immediately get to the officers because the officers were inside the “warm zone” of a standoff, recalled Asst. Chief Otoniel Reyes.

Fortunately the officers survived. But in the after-incident review, cops realized that, if the shot officers had been bleeding badly, they might not have gotten help in time. So the department decided to place tourniquets in police cruisers and train officers to use them so they could help bleeding victims at a scene where they could die within minutes.

Some officers, who were former paramedics, convinced the bosses it made more sense to equip all officers with the tourniquets rather than keep them in cruisers, because sometimes officers might not have time to head over to a car to retrieve them.

Yale-New Haven Hospital came up with $50,000 to pay for tourniquets. Then, over the past few months, Pina Violano, the hospital’s manager of injury prevention, and lead trauma surgeon Adrian Maung held training sessions for all the officers.

The last session took place Wednesday afternoon on the fourth floor of police headquarters at 1 Union Ave.

As luck would have it, Gregory Dash had been among the first officers to undergo the training, on top of training he had already received as an army medic. So he was prepared when the time came to use it Tuesday evening on Shelton Avenue.

“Stay Awake”

Dash knelt down to the left side of the 20-year-old victim on the porch. He placed the tourniquet as high as possible on the thigh. That way it would cover all other potential wounds that may not have yet been visible.

He then turned the windlass, a small metal rod, three times, then a fourth to cinch it.

“You know it works,” Dash said, “when it’s no longer bleeding.” Which, after the fourth turn, was the case.

He asked a firefighter to take a “pedal pulse” (at the victim’s foot). The firefighter couldn’t find a pulse. That was the message Dash hoped to hear; it meant the tourniquet was working, had cut off the blood flow.

Now he had to keep the victim from fading out. He tapped him on the cheek. “You’re not bleeding anymore,” Dash said. “Stay awake.”

Time froze.

“Grab my hand,” Dash told the victim. The man did. Dash felt a bond between them, a common quest to keep the man awake so he would stay alive. “He was hanging on the best he could.”

The victim was placed in an ambulance en route to the miracle workers at Yale-New Haven’s emergency department.

“Why We Do The Job”

Dash next went to to help the less-injured brother. He rode with him in another ambulance to the hospital.

There, he stayed with that brother in his room. Meanwhile he noticed the commotion as hospital staff sought to save the 20-year-old brother’s life. Dash was upset, hoping against hope that the man would survive.

Then came word that while the man’s victim remained critical, his condition was now stable. Which meant there was a good chance doctors could save him.

One doctor pulled Dash aside. “If he pulls through,” the doctor said, it wouldn’t have been possible had Dash not acted quickly and effectively at the scene.

“It was overwhelming to hear that,” Dash recalled. “It’s humbling. It’s overwhelming.” For all his time in the army, training in life-saving techniques, he’d never had to use them. Now he had his first chance to carry out the mission that led him to choose to become a cop — “to save lives.” (The victim was still listed in critical but stable condition Wednesday afternoon, according to police.)

Dash remained at the hospital for hours. At one point Asst. Chief Reyes showed up to check on the condition of another officer whose cruiser had overturned during the response to the evening’s shootings, and to check in on the two gunshot victims. He stopped by the room of the 19-year-old brother with the ankle injury. “I’m doing OK,” the man told Reyes. Then he choked up and pointed to Dash. “Thanks to that officer right there,” he said, “my brother is alive.”

“That was heroic,” Reyes said about Dash’s work. “That’s why we do the job.”

Dash’s supervisor in the Dwight policing district, Lt. John Healy, called the episode “another example” of the officer’s “professional and proactive efforts on a daily basis. Officer Dash acted swiftly and without hesitation to preserve life in response to a chaotic shooting scene.”

Dash was dispatched back to the crime scene before being sent home at 1:30 a.m. On the drive, he engaged in his usual practice of replaying that shift’s events to figure out what he could have done differently.

He concluded that he had done this one right.

That’s what he told his wife when he came home. It was his most gratifying moment to date as a police officer. He had been at the right place at the right time, with the right tool and the right training. It made the ultimate difference.

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posted by: Hill North on February 6, 2019  6:14pm

Officer Dash, job well done.

posted by: JohnDVelleca on February 6, 2019  6:22pm

I hope everyone gets a good look at what this police department is doing.  Quality after-action assessments with follow through, combat medical training, officers using tourniquets in the field…that stuff is policing at another level.  No other departments are doing this stuff.  Also, take note of the engaged supervision and active executive command checking on the well-being of the officers.  This incident is a good example of high-level police services and leadership.  The time has come for the city to show it appreciates these officers.

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 6, 2019  6:28pm

There’s a nationwide narrative elevated by many, that “black lives matter,” much to the exasperation of some.  And it is indeed true that the lives of black people do indeed matter.  However, I’m comfortable saying that all lives matter. 

I used the aforementioned as a segway to state that even white officers recognize that all lives matter.  Are there some officers who devalue human life?  Yes.  But clearly that isn’t the case here.  Allow me to go a bit further, as the NAACP prepare to glamorize the city with its annual Freedom Fund Banquet, let’s see if they can find room on their agenda to recognize this “white” heroic officer.  That’s right I said it!

Additionally, I would like to see the NH chapter of Black Lives Matter to also recognize the fine work of Officer Gregory Dash. 

If these black organizations can publicly protest when a white officer shoots an unarmed black man, then they should likewise publicly celebrate when a white officer saves the life of an unarmed black man.

Let me finish with this.  The value of many of these groups are unmeasurable.  However, you tarnish your image when you dare not embrace an officer’s heroic deeds, such as this one.

posted by: wendy1 on February 6, 2019  7:56pm

Give this cop a house.  A quick thinker and doer, I applaud this young officer.

posted by: Hill Resident on February 6, 2019  9:36pm

This is a great story about great work by a great officer. I agree with the 4 previous posters ... job well done, quality police work by quality officer with quality training, call for public recognition of this white officers action that saved a black life, and yes ... give him a house!!! Yes ... this should be the norm, but until it is, let’s celebrate Ofc. Dash!!! Thank you!!!

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 6, 2019  10:08pm

let me say this.Black Lives Matter is by no means saying that all other lives do not. It’s bringing awareness to the fact that right now black lives aren’t being treated equally when it comes to issues with police brutality.Stories like Alton Sterling, Phillandro Castille, Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice, the list goes on. It’s a social awareness and it’s not meant to divide races in any way, the people who don’t understand that are the ones causing the divide. In order for all lives to really matter we have to work on showing that black lives also matter too because the way things are going right now in society isn’t proving that they do.It is a fact that the problem of racism in the justice system and police force is supported by all statistics and all research studies on the subject. It exists and it is real. There is also a general problem with police brutality when it comes to people of color.Even Professionals of Color have there problems.

How Professionals of Color Say They Counter Bias at Work.

An African-American man in a suit was handed car keys by someone who thought he was a parking attendant. A black lawyer was patted down by guards at a courthouse, even though his white colleagues entered without a search. An African-American politician was told she did not look like a legislator.Such encounters are the plight of many people of color in the United States, highlighted in October when flight attendants questioned the credentials of a black doctor while she was trying to treat a passenger in distress.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/12/us/racial-bias-work.html

My bad.As far as good police officers.I like the one’s who will stand up to the Blue Wall of Silence.

posted by: Profound Peace on February 6, 2019  11:56pm

When officers are allowed to pursue justice, justice happens. When they are allowed to save, saving happens. Training, a heart to serve, and a department truly dedicated, to those, it’s sworn to protect is the allowance required, for true justice and safety throughout this land. While pleased by the outcome, the pursuit then should be, to make sure this doesn’t happen again. Whereby officers are allowed to pursue justice, they will search high and low for that which, is buried in their hearts. If they are allowed to save, the least of those among them will force their saving.

posted by: 1644 on February 7, 2019  7:10am

I am surprised at how this is so remarkable.  Tourniquets were part of the basic first aid I learned in Boy Scouts.  Their use may cause limb loss, but will stop an injured person from bleeding out.  Virtually anything can be used as a tourniquet, including belts and torn clothing. Any stick can be used to tighten an improvised tourniquet. Not mentioned in this article was the “quick clot” dressing, displayed in the photographs.  Quick clot was developed in response to Corporal Smith bleeding out in Black Hawk Down.  In Iraq, we were all issued large packs of quick clot crystals to be poured into arterial wounds in areas like the groin, where a tourniquet could not help.

posted by: nhfd0331 on February 7, 2019  8:13am

Incredible Job officer Dash and all of the members involved. From experience I know that its tough to deal with the many stress factors that come with an incident like this, but his quick clear headed thinking resulted in helping to save a life the other night. Once again great Job.
-Capt. Richardson NHFD

posted by: westville man on February 7, 2019  8:44am

This officer is clearly a hero. I respect and admire many police officers. Some are my friends. Here comes the BUT:

What I don’t like is being told that I cannot point out egregious police actions without being called a cop hater or not appreciating the police. I am a critical and independent thinker and take each situation as I see it.
I don’t get it. We can all agree that there are bad doctors, lawyers, mechanics, plumbers, and people in general, but God forbid we point out bad cops. My own interaction with the police has been mixed. Some are good and some are dismissive and rude and not interested in certain types of crimes.
I agree with 3/5ths-  break the blue wall of silence and some of us won’t need to point out bad police behavior.
Back to this story-  we need more just like him.  Thank you officer!

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 7, 2019  8:51am

@ Threefifths,

“Black Lives Matter is by no means saying that all other lives do not. It’s bringing awareness to the fact that right now black lives aren’t being treated equally when it comes to issues with police brutality.” 

My comments in no way suggested that the Black Lives Matters organization stated anything in the realm in which you’re trying to convey.  If your point is to try and define the organization more broadly, than I suggest you have at it.  Nevertheless, I stand by my assertion regarding how I believe this officer’s heroic deeds should be recognized by these very factions that would’ve been vehemently opposed to him, had he gunned this man down innocently.  Let me again make myself clear for those who enjoy the art of “attempting” to parse my words.  I find the value of some these organizations unmeasurable.  That’s the second time I’ve written that.  It’s the lack of consistency that I have a problem with.  And I invite anyone to debate on that.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 7, 2019  11:01am

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 7, 2019 8:51am

I stand by my assertion regarding how I believe this officer’s heroic deeds should be recognized by these very factions that would’ve been vehemently opposed to him, had he gunned this man down innocently. 

He did his Job.No question.He is paid to do that job.Let me say this.The historic role of policing in reinforcing racial inequality and how it has led to black Americans’ fear of police.Black communities who often face higher rates of crime and thus want good relationships with law enforcement. But that is not likely until the U.S. finds a way to address its history of using the police as a tool to reinforce systems of racial inequity. When you talk about these very factions that would’ve been vehemently opposed to him, had he gunned this man down innocently.Let us take a look at why and the History of the Police and the Black communities.For black Americans, policing is “the most enduring aspect of the struggle for civil rights,Because it has always been a mechanism for racial control.Historically, in both the South and the North, the police have defended and enforced racism and segregation attacking civil rights protesters and disrupting strikes of black workers seeking to integrate workplaces and neighborhoods.Stories of police harassment and violence in black communities are common. Young black men are 21 times more likely to be shot and killed by police than young white men. They are more likely to face ongoing everyday slights and indignities at the hands of police. The underlying causes run deep: Black people often see police as the face of larger systems of inequality in the justice system, employment, education, and housing.I will say it again.A good police officer will stand up to the Blue Wall of Silence.I have seen one yet in this state.

It’s Time For Cops To Break The Blue Code Of Silence

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/earl-ofari-hutchinson/its-time-for-cops-to-brea_b_12173778.html

posted by: Gretchen Pritchard on February 7, 2019  11:15am

Good job Officer Dash.

And how sad that dealing with victims of shootings is a routine part of life in New Haven and in every part of the USA; that treating gunshot wounds is an everyday matter in our hospitals.  Surgeons come from all over the world to our trauma centers to learn the latest life-saving techniques, because here they have so many opportunities to observe and practice them.

Only in America.

Too many guns.  TOO MANY GUNS. 

TOO

MANY

GUNS

There is no quick or easy solution to this plague, but no excuse not to be trying, every way we can.

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 7, 2019  11:34am

Threefifths,

I certainly do not need you to attempt to lecture me about police brutality as it relates to black people. 

Bro, I live in this country too.  I read and watch the news also.  And I’m still a black man who may someday meet one of these sick officers.

Moreover, I’m more than familiar with the Jim Crow Laws that enforced racial segregation in the South between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the beginning of the civil rights movement in the 1950s.  Those laws highlighted overt racism.  And in many cases and areas of the country today, they still exist.  And yes, I’m also aware of the innocent black men/woman who were; and are being killed by the hands of sick, white police officers.  But when we find white officers buying black children Christmas gifts (who perhaps wouldn’t otherwise have a Christmas), saving black lives and helping out on their off days in sporting events, we as a black community in my view, need to celebrate those officers in a huge way. 

Asked the brother who was saved how he feels about Officer Gregory Dash.

posted by: Patricia Kane on February 7, 2019  12:39pm

Let me join everyone in acknowledging Officer Dash’s job in saving a life. It has to be a total satisfaction and a source of pride to have been the one to do this.
    Thank you for your service.

posted by: WhatTheWhat on February 7, 2019  12:51pm

@ THREEFIFTHS
Maybe I spaced out or something but I’m not sure why you have to ramble on about Black Lives Matter instead of just letting Officer Dash be recognized for doing a good job in what must have been a very stressful situation.

Good job, officer!! Keep up the great work!

posted by: MB down on February 7, 2019  12:58pm

JohnDVelleca
“No other departments are doing this stuff.” - WOW, you have been out of the game a long time.  Other departments have trained their officers years ago.  Kind of like NHPD doing a press release on their FV training pertaining to a law that started on 1/1/2019.  No one noticed the training occurred in late January?

posted by: thecove on February 7, 2019  2:03pm

Nice work.

posted by: JohnDVelleca on February 7, 2019  3:12pm

Lol…yup, legitimately a dinosaur at this point. I guess good job to all of the departments who do this type of training. Makes sense…

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 7, 2019  3:38pm

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 7, 2019 11:34am

Threefifths,

I certainly do not need you to attempt to lecture me about police brutality as it relates to black people.

Was not a attempt to lecture you.You said There’s a nationwide narrative elevated by many, that “black lives matter,” much to the exasperation of some.  And it is indeed true that the lives of black people do indeed matter.  However, I’m comfortable saying that all lives matter. So I said let me say this.Black Lives Matter is by no means saying that all other lives do not. It’s bringing awareness to the fact that right now black lives aren’t being treated equally when it comes to issues with police brutality.So I was answering to what you wrote.

But when we find white officers buying black children Christmas gifts (who perhaps wouldn’t otherwise have a Christmas), saving black lives and helping out on their off days in sporting events, we as a black community in my view, need to celebrate those officers in a huge way.

There are some in the black community who celebrate those officers in a huge way. But there are a whole lot who do not. I can not take that reason away from them .Because I know there pain when it comes to there dealing with the police.

Asked the brother who was saved how he feels about Officer Gregory Dash.

Well ask these people and there familes about waht they think about the police.

Barbara Fair who now has a lawsuit for false arrest by the NHPD

Emma Jones

The victims of the Billy White and his Beat Down crew.

Amadou Diallo who poilce shot at 50 times.

My Cousin who live next door to who almost got hit buy those 50 Rounds

Part one.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 7, 2019  3:45pm

Part two.
Ask these people in In South Carolina what they think about the police.

TAKEN: How police departments make millions by seizing property

https://www.greenvilleonline.com/in-depth/news/taken/2019/01/27/civil-forfeiture-south-carolina-police-property-seizures-taken-exclusive-investigation/2457838002/

posted by: WhatTheWhat on February 7, 2019 12:51pm

@ THREEFIFTHS
Maybe I spaced out or something but I’m not sure why you have to ramble on about Black Lives Matter instead of just letting Officer Dash be recognized for doing a good job in what must have been a very stressful situation.

Good job, officer!! Keep up the great work!

I was answering Mr. Jenkins question.

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 7, 2019  4:32pm

Threefifths,

You can post the names of those who have been killed by police as far back as the 1900’s, but what’s your point bro?  Unlike you (perhaps), I don’t hate the police, period.  We live in a violent society.  A society that is saturated with predators seeking in whom they can plunder.  Yes, some do where uniforms, but most of them are in plain clothes. 

You have officers who are being slaughtered for less than a salary of $50,000 a year.  I feel equally for their families as do I the families of those in whom you have mentioned also. 

Maybe it’s just me, but your responses give me the impression that you view the life; or should I say death of an officer as good news?

As a humanitarian, I’m saddened by the senseless death of every human being at the hands of another. Notwithstanding, the ethnic makeup.  I don’t see life through a black or white lens.

In my almost 60 years here on earth, I have been privileged to have met some fantastic Jewish, Hispanic, white, Asian, Islamic and black people in my worldly travels.  Conversely, I have met some bad individuals too.

posted by: observer1 on February 7, 2019  5:38pm

Why don’t we look at everyone as an individual. I remember a quote “people should not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” That quote referred to all colors, not just black people. No one race is all good or all bad. All cops are not bad, there are a lot of good ones. Give officer Dash the credit he deserves and the benefit of the doubt.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 7, 2019  6:54pm

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 7, 2019 4:32pm
Threefifths,

You can post the names of those who have been killed by police as far back as the 1900’s, but what’s your point bro?

You have may made my point. History of people of color Kill by the poilce.Black newspapers reported incidents of police brutality and killing by the poilce throughout the early and mid-20th century.Blacks are 2.5 times more likely to be shot by police than whites That is a fact and Police killingsThe police should be held to higher standards than the rest of us where was the good cops when president Donald Trump encouraged police officers to be rough with suspects, essentially endorsing brutal behavior.He told officers not to protect suspects’ heads when putting them in police cars. “Please don’t be too nice,” he said. In CNN’s footage from the event, officers can be heard laughing, cheering, and applauding.how come the good cops you talk about did not open there mouth?

Unlike you (perhaps), I don’t hate the police, period.  We live in a violent society.  A society that is saturated with predators seeking in whom they can plunder.  Yes, some do where uniforms, but most of them are in plain clothes.

Never said I hate the police.I said As far as good police officers.I like the one’s who will stand up to the Blue Wall of Silence.I have family who are police officers and are retired police officer who broke away from the Blue wall of Silence.They were label rats.No one want to work with themAs far as   A society that is saturated with predators seeking in whom they can plunder. Yes, some do where uniforms, but most of them are in plain clothes.But when the one’s in uniforms kill.the major of the time they walk away free from Jail time.The predators as you call them do time.That is a fact.

Part One

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 7, 2019  7:26pm

Part two.
You have officers who are being slaughtered for less than a salary of $50,000 a year.  I feel equally for their families as do I the families of those in whom you have mentioned also. Maybe it’s just me, but your responses give me the impression that you view the life; or should I say death of an officer as good news?

The officer know the risk of the job.I do not look at the death of a officer as Good News.Again My point is which you seem to duck is As far as good police officers.I like the one’s who will stand up to the Blue Wall of Silence.

I don’t see life through a black or white lens.

For me as a BlackMan in this country I have to see Black and White.As my mother told me and I have told my children.As Black People you are born into combat.I told white folks that I know that when it comes to my children.I have to pray everyday that they come home and will not get stop by the poilce.I tell white folks that I tell my children when they are pulled over by the police.Just take the ticket and get home.In fact one of these same white folks I know ask me this question which was. I heard from a lot of Black People when they are in a room of white people the can feel they are not want it.I told him we Black Folks have Sense like Spiderman.We can sense danger lurking vibrations in the air.racism and bigotry when we are around some white folks.

In my almost 60 years here on earth, I have been privileged to have met some fantastic Jewish, Hispanic, white, Asian, Islamic and black people in my worldly travels.  Conversely, I have met some bad individuals too.

Again Bottom line is I stand by what I have said which was .As far as good police officers.I like the one’s who will stand up to the Blue Wall of Silence.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 7, 2019  7:34pm

posted by: observer1 on February 7, 2019 5:38pm

Why don’t we look at everyone as an individual. I remember a quote “people should not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” That quote referred to all colors, not just black people. No one race is all good or all bad. All cops are not bad, there are a lot of good ones. Give officer Dash the credit he deserves and the benefit of the doubt.

I tell you what Every saw the movie or Read the Book Black Like Me? it is a true story.
It is the story about John Howard Griffin.He was an American journalist and author from Texas who wrote about racial equality.decided to investigate firsthand the plight of African Americans in the South.So he went to a dermatologist for aid in darkening his skin, being treated with a course of drugs, sunlamp treatments, and skin creams. Griffin shaved his head in order to hide his straight hair. He spent weeks travelling as a black man in New Orleans and parts of Mississippi (with side trips to South Carolina and Georgia), getting around mainly by bus and by hitchhiking.

Black Like Me 1964

https://youtu.be/Ww0q4XhxPAA

So maybe you can do the same thing and see what we Black people have to deal with everyday.

posted by: narcan on February 10, 2019  2:39am

I agree with most of John’s comment, but I have to point out that basic bleeding control is considered the standard in law enforcement now. I have not heard of a single academy that does not teach it or fail to encourage, if not require, that officers carry tourniquets and/or other bleeding control tools.

While it is laudable NHPD is doing this, it’s sadly one of many essential capabilities that they are years behind the curve on, owing to financial neglect and mismanagement. Truly progressive police departments anticipate and prepare for incidents rather than rely on reaction and luck. Preparation usually costs more than Luck on the front end though.

Bravo Zulu, Officer Dash! I hope your actions encourage City Hall to recognize what great things NHPD is capable of when they are given the means to fulfill their mission and strong leaders rather than politically friendly managers.

posted by: JohnDVelleca on February 10, 2019  10:00am

I’m definitely a rusty old goat when it comes some aspects of present day policing. However, I’m not sure if the NHPD is behind the times because I remember a host of other issues impeding this type of first responder service by the cops. Primarily, in New Haven the cops are not medical first responders, the FD is. And I can remember it being a huge taboo to render any medical aid as a cop. The FD and PD command officers would absolutely flip out. Then the police union refused the role of first responders for cops without significant concessions from the city. The city said “no deal” because the FD would handle the medical first response responsibilities. We took a hands off approach and the FD said “thanks.” So, we never touched anyone in need of medical attention and it never really mattered. The FD was usually there as quickly as we were. So, as usual, the issue isn’t as simplistic as it appears. One thing is for sure though..,I’m old and getting older.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 11, 2019  9:02am

No talk about this.
New Haven police kept drug policy a secret — illegally.

An “Employment Drug Policy” — illegally discussed behind closed doors and withheld from public view for more than a year

https://www.nhregister.com/news/article/Report-New-Haven-police-kept-drug-policy-a-13603913.php

In fact I was told the NHPD has a history of cover up.

Federal Suit Filed by 52 Persons Charging New Haven Wiretapping

A group of 52 lawyers, doctors, students, journalists, antiwar activists and former Black Panthers filed suit in United States District Court here today, charging that they had been the victims of a campaign of wiretapping, break‐ins and “dirty tricks” by members of the New Haven Police Department, the state police and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Wow. And NHPD been doing this far hack as 1943

The suit and the Police Commission’s investigation came as a result of a series of articles in The New Haven JournalCourier by Andrew Houlding. alleging that illegal wiretapping had begun as far hack as 1943 and had continued until 1971. The initial targets of the wiretapping, according to the articles, had been gamblers and other criminals. But by the 1960’s the list of targets had grown to include politicians, antiwar and civil rights activists, as well as lawyers and journalists.

https://www.nytimes.com/1977/05/13/archives/federal-suit-filed-by-52-persons-charging-new-haven-wiretapping.html

Where was the Good police officers who knew about this and fail to step forward?

posted by: 1644 on February 11, 2019  11:02am

JDeV:  When I toured the Hartford PD as a law student in 1993, the tour guide told us that if his officers did shoot someone, he expected them to immediately administer first aid, just as Sanchez did.  Second, yes, it is pretty simple.  The question is, if it is in your power to save a life, will you?  Applying direct pressure or a tourniquet, if needed, to prevent someone bleeding out it just the thing decent humans do.  Passively watching someone die while they bleed out is just callous and inhuman, and so is any union that supports such inaction.

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 11, 2019  12:07pm

NO police department is perfect, period. Just like the people who often complain about police officers are they themselves imperfect.  In fact, some of them have committed so many crimes, that they’ve developed total disdain for police officers everywhere.  And yes, one can find statistics, conjured facts, facts, liars and a whole host of other adjectives that describe police officers.  And yes again, bad officers do make it bad for all departments nationwide.  However, criminals far outnumber bad officers.

I do support holding bad officers accountable for bad deeds.  Conversely, I believe in celebrating officers for good deeds also. 

As a whole, in my view, NH is blessed to have such a fine police department. 

Maybe it has occurred, but I don’t recall hearing about a white officer killing an unarmed black man.  In saying that, I’m not in no way dismissing other crimes heaped upon the innocent.  But the crime of killing innocent black people, has been the linchpin that has spawned many of these current black activists and black organizations, that protest police departments in various parts of the nation.

NH should embrace their police department by paying them what they deserve.  And what they deserve is more than what they are getting in terms of health benefits and in pay.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 11, 2019  5:35pm

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 11, 2019 12:07pm

However, criminals far outnumber bad officers

When I took political science in Collage one of my professor always said use Data and Research to back up you point? where can I find the Data and Research criminals far outnumber bad officers?

I can find this data.

New York police officer was arraigned on Tuesday on perjury charges after prosecutors said he repeatedly lied about how the police found a gun in a Brooklyn apartment.

The officer, Joseph Moloney, 27, is accused of providing several false stories, under oath, about how the police discovered a gun in an apartment in the Red Hook Houses complex in South Brooklyn in 2016. Officer Moloney initially claimed that he had found the gun when it was another officer — a sergeant — who had discovered it.

Two N.Y.P.D. Officers Are Charged With Lying About a Suspect

Cyrus R. Vance Jr., the Manhattan district attorney, said the charges against the detectives were a “gross violation of their training, N.Y.P.D. protocol and the law.”

“When members of law enforcement commit misconduct,” he added, “they threaten the credibility of our work and the safety of the citizens whom we are sworn to protect.”

How many people are siting in a jail cell because of cops like this?

Even Frank Serpico one of the good cops said this.

The Police Are Still Out of Control
I should know.

By FRANK SERPICO October 23, 2014

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/10/the-police-are-still-out-of-control-112160

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 11, 2019  9:33pm

According to Worldometers, the U.S. Population is 328,204,904 and counting.

                  Vs.

There are over 18,000 Federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies around the United States, and it is estimated that there are between 750,000 and 850,000 sworn officers. If you count non-sworn personnel who work for police departments, you get over 1 million.

And currently, according to these statistics -

According to the US Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), 2,220,300 adults were incarcerated in US federal and state prisons and county jails in 2013 – about 0.91% of adults (1 in 110) in the U.S. resident population. Additionally, 4,751,400 adults in 2013 (1 in 51) were on probation or on parole.

Now, for those who are intelligent, I invite you to do the math.  Oops!  The sound you just heard was me dropping the mic.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 12, 2019  4:41pm

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 11, 2019 9:33pm

Now, for those who are intelligent, I invite you to do the math.  Oops!  The sound you just heard was me dropping the mic.

And how many could be Innocence?

Innocence Project - Help us put an end to wrongful convictions!

https://www.innocenceproject.org/

My Bad.Do this math.Hot off the press.

City Settles Excessive Force Case
by CHRISTOPHER PEAK | Feb 12, 2019 3:16 pm

An Ecuadorean immigrant who claims a cop beat him up for no reason is getting a $20,000 payment to dismiss his pending legal action.

Luis Jimenez-Jarmillo said that, in 2010, then-Officer Martin Feliciano slammed him into a car then threw him to the ground without cause in front of Jimenez-Jarmillo’s children.

After nearly a decade pleading his case before state and federal judges, Jimenez-Jarmillo accepted a $20,000 deal to finally let it go last month, according to a settlement the Independent obtained through the Connecticut Freedom of Information Act.The city’s lawyers maintained that the officers had probable cause to make an arrest and that they used reasonable force in getting him in cuffs. They added that officers are entitled to “qualified immunity” as government employees to make mistakes on the job that aren’t clearly unconstitutional. Jimenez-Jarmillo were tried before three different judges. They were initially dismissed, appealed, retried and finally retried again. Each time, Jimenez-Jarmillo was cleared.

https://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/luis_jimenez-jarmillo_police_settlement/#cmt

In fact the cop Felciano, a patrol officer in the K-9 unit, was promoted to the rank of sergeant last month.

https://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/police_promotions/

Barbara Fair is next.
Local activist suing New Haven cops over 2017 arrest.

https://www.nhregister.com/news/article/Local-activist-suing-New-Haven-cops-over-2017-13568889.php

Do the math!!!.

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 12, 2019  5:31pm

There’s a court jesters that enjoys attempting to spar with me on this forum.  What they don’t know or shall I say realize, is that they’re actually sparring with themselves.

As a sanguine person that I am, the nihilistic individuals can continue to find the negatives that exist in the NHPD.  But while you’re at it, don’t forget to pause for a moment and plaster the $&&$;:@&)?$& you raised while committing the various crimes you lavished in. 

Finally, I thought I made myself abundantly clear.  I only heap praise on the good officers and never the bad wherever they are.  But this critic enjoys trying to prove someone wrong.  It won’t work with me bro.  I suggest you find a weak victim and see if you can gain a victory over there.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on February 12, 2019  8:55pm

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 12, 2019 5:31pm

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 12, 2019 5:31pm
There’s a court jesters that enjoys attempting to spar with me on this forum.  What they don’t know or shall I say realize, is that they’re actually sparring with themselves.

LOL!!!!

As a sanguine person that I am, the nihilistic individuals can continue to find the negatives that exist in the NHPD.  But while you’re at it, don’t forget to pause for a moment and plaster the $&&$;:@&)?$& you raised while committing the various crimes you lavished in.

Did you find a poilce record of crimes on Me?LOL!!! In fact I found a lot on the police.

Finally, I thought I made myself abundantly clear.  I only heap praise on the good officers and never the bad wherever they are.  But this critic enjoys trying to prove someone wrong.  It won’t work with me bro.  I suggest you find a weak victim and see if you can gain a victory over there.

And as I abundantly Made myself clear.I stand by .As far as good police officers.I like the one’s who will stand up to the Blue Wall of Silence.


I suggest you find a weak victim and see if you can gain a victory over there.

I have prove my victory by Data and Research.In Fact from what I have heard.There are some more lawsuits to come on NHPD..

posted by: Hill North on February 13, 2019  3:41am

Threefifth’s and Brian L Jenkins
Respect and honor. I commend you both on your acahemy achievement, writing skills and data research.  Which encourage me to work harder, so I could express my thoughts clearer. Sometime we all have to look at the past and recognize where we should put our energy.  “United we stand, divided we fall”

posted by: Brian L. Jenkins on February 13, 2019  9:44am

Hill North,

If what I write inspires you to work harder, then I have done my job.  I too learn from even those in whom I disagree with. 

I steer clear of making racist, biased, homophobic, xenophobic or misogynistic comparisons when critiquing.  However, what I do relish in doing, is commenting on what I think are substantive topics that somewhat mirror my experiences and or beliefs.  That said, whites, blacks and Hispanics might find my comments objectionable at times, but NO one can ever accuse me of being unfair.  Because after all, I too am entitled to my own opinion.