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4 New City Charter Schools Proposed

by Melissa Bailey | Jan 16, 2013 1:04 pm

(28) Comments | Commenting has been closed | E-mail the Author

Posted to: Schools, School Reform

Melissa Bailey Photo After two more young men connected to his congregation died of gun violence, Rev. Eldren D. Morrison concluded the need for a new charter school in Dixwell and Newhallville had grown all the more urgent: “the need is between life and death.”

Morrison, the 31-year-old pastor of Varick Memorial A.ME. Zion Church, has been working for several years on a plan to open a new school in the neighborhood called the Booker T. Washington Academy.

In a letter submitted to the state earlier this month, Morrison (pictured above with a portrait of Washington) announced plans to apply for state approval to create a charter school serving grades pre-K to 4. The letter came in response to an invitation from the state seeking ideas for new charter schools—public schools that operate on their own founding documents, funded and sanctioned by the state.

Twenty-four groups across the state responded. Four of them proposed schools in New Haven.

The three other ideas for New Haven would create a math and science high school, a “life skills academy for brown boys” run by the Urban League, and an unspecified charter school run by SmartStart Education, LLC.

The applicants for those proposed schools chose to give the state a heads up by filing a letter of intent to apply for a charter. More applicants may enter the fray when the official request for proposals goes out later this month.

Morrison (pictured), who joined Varick in October of 2007, expanded the church’s camp into a more academically rigorous summer school. He assembled a board community members and educators to build that program into a full-fledged school. He said he sees the school as a key solution to a “sense of hopelessness” in a community rocked by gun violence.

Over the past two months, Morrison said, two teenagers from Dixwell/Newhallville were shot and killed in the city. Both had children, he said. Their moms attended Varick.

“Too many of our kids are locked into this cycle” of violence, poverty and incarceration, he said. “Education is the way out of this mindset and this way of life.”

Looking at the test scores of kids in Dixwell and Newhallville’s three nearby schools (King/Robinson, Lincoln/Bassett and Wexler/Grant), Morrison’s group concluded that by the 3rd grade, less than a third of kids are reading and doing math at grade level.

“Our children are being left behind,” Morrison wrote.

In drafting a proposal for a school, Morrison drew inspiration from Booker T. Washington, a freed Virginia slave who rose to be an early national African-American leader. Washington founded the Tuskegee Normal School for Colored Teachers in 1881 in a shanty building next to a church; by his death in 1915, it had grown into a formidable African-American teachers college with a million-dollar endowment, Morrison recalled. Washington gave his final public speech from Varick’s pulpit in 1915, when the church was already 100 years old.

Morrison proposes following Washington’s footsteps by opening a Booker T. Washington Academy in September with 36 kids in grades pre-K and K. The school would then add one grade level each year until a maximum size of 216 kids in grades pre-K to 4. Kids would enjoy a smaller classroom—18 kids instead of the 26 or 27 in New Haven’s public school district. The school year would run 210 days instead of the traditional 180. The school day would run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with extra child care before and after.

The academy would be located in the neighborhood, in a church-owned property either on Sperry or Charles Street. Applicants from the neighborhood would get preference in the admissions lottery.

In effort to maintain “flexibility of services,” the teaching staff would not be unionized, according to board member Chaka Felder-McEntire (at right in photo with board member Belinda Carberry). The estimated first-year budget would be $1.4 million.

Felder-McEntire knows that figure cold because she already worked out the exhaustive details of the school last year, in a proposal that measured hundreds of pages long. The group drew up that document when it applied to become a charter last spring. After all that, the state didn’t end up approving any new charters. Only two have opened in the past seven years.

State education chief Stefan Pryor, a founder of Achievement First’s flagship charter school in New Haven, is giving charter proponents hope that the state will open more charter seats. Getting state approval is only half the battle, however: Each school still has to get the state legislature to fund the school through a special line item in the state budget based on a per-pupil fee, which was recently cut to $10,200.

Even if Booker T. Washington Academy gets state funding as a charter school, it would need to supplement that money to pay for the longer school day and year. Board member Belinda Carberry (pictured), an assistant principal at Hillhouse High School with 35 years’ experience in education, plans to hold an upcoming fundraiser at her home. The board also includes Varick Chief of Staff Jesse Phillips; local elementary school teacher Zania Collier; and Kanicka Ingram, associate director of admissions for Quinnipiac University. Felder-McEntire currently works on college access programs at Southern Connecticut State University.

Math & Science High

Across town, another group of education advocates is also making a second attempt at landing state approval for a charter school. The group is led by Ismail Agirman, a senior engineer at Otis Elevators. She has been seeking to open a math and science high school for years. Agirman got approval in 2006 for one such school in Hartford, but the state legislature didn’t pass funding for new charter schools that year, according to board member Fatih Mercan, a Yale molecular biologist currently researching cancer. 

Mercan said he got hooked on biology early on, in high school, when he took part in a biology Olympiad. He wants other students to catch the science fever, too, so they can enter the fast-growing field of medical, academic and industry jobs that require a math and science education.

A lot of students “don’t want to choose math because they feel unprepared and they are afraid of it,” he said.

The Connecticut Academy of Math and Science (CAMS) would be a new math and science school for grades 7 to 12 in New Haven. The proposal is similar to New Haven’s district-run Engineering Science and University Magnet School, which is in the process of expanding to serve grades 6 to 12. Mercan said he doesn’t see a problem in having two similar schools in the same town; he said there’s plenty of need for math and science education.

CAMS would feature a longer school day and a 200-day school year. It would start small and grow to serve 250 kids in four years.

As with the Booker T. Washington Academy, CAMS’s founders already drew up an extensive proposal for the school for last year’s application. The school has assembled a nine-person board, including: Agirman, the lead applicant; Mercan; state Deputy Speaker of the House Kevin Ryan; Yale Police Chief Ronnell Higgins; Ahmet Gunay, a postdoctoral research scientist at the Worchester Polytechnique Institute; New Haven attorney Gregory Gallo; local parent Kimberly Alicea; Unilever financial analyst Mehmet A. Basaran; and Diane Ariza, a top executive at Quinnipiac University.

All Boys

A third proposal came in from the Stamford-based chapter of the National Urban League, a New York-based civil rights organization with 98 local affiliates. The Whitney Young Leadership Academy for Boys would serve 150 boys in grades 9 to 12. The Urban League runs several schools across the country; would be the first in Connecticut, according to Valery Shultz-Wilson, president and CEO of the Urban League of Southern Connecticut.

Shultz-Wilson said the school would target African-American and Latino boys—a group that suffers from higher dropout rates and lower performance in New Haven and nationally. These boys “have been left out,” she said.

“We have not been able to develop, or to come up with the appropriate formula for, success. From where we stand, this is a group of our students who we are not willing to let stand by and wither on the vine.”

Like Morrison’s, the Urban League’s proposal talks about ending the school-to-prison pipeline that traps urban kids. Shultz-Wilson said the New Haven school would be based on a similar all-boys school in Baltimore.

All three proposed schools would be traditional state charter schools, not local charters, which would require approval by the New Haven school board. A fourth letter of intent to open a charter school came in from Isaak Aronson at SmartStart Education at 59 Elm St. Aronson could not be reached for comment, and the proposal provides no details.

 

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posted by: ELMCITYDOC on January 16, 2013  1:33pm

I remain dismayed that education seems to be the one area where we are comfortable allowing people with limited expertise run such an important endeavor. I once worked in a Medical School library but I can’t imagine anyone thinking that would qualify me to oversee a medical program. New Haven doesn’t need more charter schools run by private entities with limited interest and proficiency. We need to focus on strengthening the schools we have, supporting the communities from which those children come, and returning to the ideas where we valued teachers and respected their expertise. It’s maddening that there’s a national debate about arming teachers with guns, yet little discussion of arming them with the resources they need to be effective in their chosen profession. Ridiculous

posted by: Atwater on January 16, 2013  1:42pm

The State should not fund any school run by a religious organization. This will be strongly opposed.

posted by: Threefifths on January 16, 2013  6:49pm

Looking at the test scores of kids in Dixwell and Newhallville’s three nearby schools (King/Robinson, Lincoln/Bassett and Wexler/Grant), Morrison’s group concluded that by the 3rd grade, less than a third of kids are reading and doing math at grade level.

“Our children are being left behind,” Morrison wrote.

I see Rev. Morrison has not done his homework.How about how the Charter School sent there failing students back to the public school.How about how charter schools are cherry-picking their students.How about how Charter Schools donot take ELL and takespecial needs children because it will lower their test scores.And by the way it any just the schools in the Black community that is failing.Your Black Churchs are failing.Did not Booker T. Washington say cast your buckets were you are?We donot need any charter schools.We can work with what we got.

posted by: Greg-Morehead on January 16, 2013  7:24pm

@Atwater
Why would “this be strongly opposed”?  Why shouldn’t the state fund a school run by a religious organization?  I think we need MORE schools run by religious organizations.  Question to everyone… We don’t allow prayer in schools, but when things happen in the schools, we turn around and have prayer vigils in and around the schools.  Isn’t that an oxymoron?
I think having schools run by a religious organization is needed in the time that we are living in.  I know people will chime in with their two cents but with the way that things are going in the schools, it would not hurt anything to have these types of schools in our community.
Good job Pastor Morrison and I think more people should support positive things like this.

posted by: Threefifths on January 16, 2013  9:33pm

Charter school advocates are among the biggest scam artists in politics. They use the language of community control to transfer public assets into private hands.

Glen Ford.

Charters Have Nothing to do With Community Control of Schools
Tue, 05/08/2012 - 21:47 — Glen Ford

http://blackagendareport.com/content/charters-have-nothing-do-community-control-schools

posted by: Threefifths on January 16, 2013  11:08pm

posted by: GregMorehead on January 16, 2013 6:24pm

Question to everyone… We don’t allow prayer in schools, but when things happen in the schools, we turn around and have prayer vigils in and around the schools.  Isn’t that an oxymoron?

Do you homework.It’s a Myth that Prayer is Banned in Public Schoos.Organized prayer in the public school setting, whether in the classroom or at a school-sponsored event, is unconstitutional. The only type of prayer that is constitutionally permissible is private, voluntary student prayer that does not interfere with the school’s educational mission. Even The Supreme Court has never held that students cannot pray in school. Instead, the Supreme Court has ruled that the government cannot have anything to do with prayer in schools.Students can pray quietly and silently any time, but if they want to do more, then they cannot do it in a way which disrupts other students or classes, because the purpose of schools is to teach.

We turn around and have prayer vigils in and around the schools.  Isn’t that an oxymoron?
Matthew 6:1-34 Beware of practicing your righteousness before other people in order to be seen by them, for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven. “Thus, when you give to the needy, sound no trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be praised by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, so that your giving may be in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you. “And when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites. For they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners, that they may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward.

posted by: Threefifths on January 16, 2013  11:18pm

In effort to maintain “flexibility of services,” the teaching staff would not be unionized, according to board member Chaka Felder-McEntire (at right in photo with board member Belinda Carberry). The estimated first-year budget would be $1.4 million.

Again do your homework.If the teachers want to be unionized.Under the National Labor Relations Act of 1935, this act protects your right to form a union or to join an existing union. Your employer cannot prevent you from reading union literature or stop you from recruiting co-workers to join a union as long as you conduct these activities outside your work hours or during breaks. You also have the right to sign petitions demanding changes in your wages, working conditions or work schedule. However, the law only protects the rights of ordinary workers to unionize as opposed to supervisors and managers.

posted by: ELMCITYDOC on January 17, 2013  1:24am

It’s shocking that a former political official, Mr. Moorehead, has such a limited understanding of basic Constitutional principles such as the separation of church and state. Government should neither promote nor hinder religion. That includes not allowing public dollars to fund religious institutions (e.g. schools) that promote a particular world view. Our public schools are comprised of children who are Jewish and Hindu. Methodist and Wiccan. Pentecostal and Atheist. Unitarian Universalist and Agnostic. Baptist and Muslim. Saying that public school principals who govern over a diverse student body shouldn’t be forced to lead those students in a generic prayer, is quite different from a group of private citizens making the decision to gather in public prayer after a tragedy. As a person of faith I cringe when I hear people suggest that tragedy happens because we allowed government to take God out of schools. If your faith is so shallow that a government edict meant to recognize the most fundamental rights of our democracy can prevent your praise, then I would consider that worse than having no faith at all. The U.S. Supreme Court NEVER banned prayer in schools. There is nothing that says our children cannot take the time to bow their heads, give thanks, or ask for guidance.

posted by: Atwater on January 17, 2013  10:22am

@MoreHead
It has been stated before, but I will repeat it. The state cannot endorse any religious institution and therefore cannot fund any religious organization in their quest to establish a school. And, the last thing that this society needs is more superstition (i.e. religion), we need schools based on solid principles of reason not on the fraudulent and malleable morality of Christianity. Those who wait for a god to save them will be waiting a long time.
Mr. Morrison’s effort will be opposed.

posted by: Jacques Strap on January 17, 2013  12:07pm

Morrison would do better to educate many of the ignorant parents in some of this city’s worst neighborhoods.

There are many parents who don’t attend parent conferences, who neglect/fight school mandates/expectations, who fail to send their child to school on time and daily, and who neglect their child’s need to come to school prepared (with homework and bookbag).

There is only so much a teacher or administrator can do in a 6-hour day.  If parents don’t take their child’s education seriously, how can anybody possibly expect the kids themselves to?

posted by: Brutus2011 on January 17, 2013  3:23pm

A lot of good points here.

I am conflicted—on one hand I am heartened to read of a community response to our kid’s dilemma—especially our boys. On the other hand, I am dismayed because our constitutional system works against this particular approach—and these good church folks should know that.

“Jaques Strap” makes an essential point. I would like to add that any thinking and educated adult knows this point to be true.

The real question is why do those who are in charge of public education—local, state, federal, including unions—do not face this issue squarely but instead publicly issue false statements like—“poverty does not matter,” and “teachers are responsible for the achievement gap,” etc.

I have come to believe that those in charge, here and elsewhere, are protecting their handsome pay packages and their reputations. Their audience is relatively unsophisticated which is why all the reform happens in the inner cities and not in the wealthier suburbs.

It is about money and egos—and the pickings are a lot easier here than in Madison or New Caanan

All while our kids kill each other in the streets.

It is a shame—a low-down, dirty shame.

posted by: PH on January 17, 2013  5:32pm

No madrassas needed in the USA. Even Christian ones.  Religion should be sequestered far far away from educational facilities.  We need children to develop critical thinking skills, not faith in magic.

And teachers should most certainly be unionized.  “Maintaining flexibility” is just a baloney term for pocketing money for administrators at the expense of teachers. The more schools that siphon money from the public school system, the weaker that system gets.  The church should stick with its summer camp and leave the school year to the professionals.

posted by: Greg-Morehead on January 18, 2013  12:49am

@threefifths,
@elmcitydoc

First off, there is NOTHING wrong with me giving my opinion on certain matters.  Each of you come on here, hide behind your fictitious names, and chime in on various articles that are posted.  That is my personal opinion to applaud Pastor Morrison for what he’s doing.  Just because I comment on matters, here, or any of you for that matter, doesn’t mean that what we say will be passed into legislation.  So, just like you have your right to so called free speech on here, so do I. 

And @Atwater, how do you know that Pastor Morrison’s idea for this type of school would be opposed?  Everyone on the NHI is so quick to shoot something down, in fact it is just your opinion and you can’t pass or deny anything!  And for this same reason, that is why I don’t comment too much, just because some people really have a way of killing other people’s dreams!

posted by: Tom Burns on January 18, 2013  1:21am

Are you kidding me? In the city that has taken the most progressive steps in our nation ever and the fruits of our labor are paying off—these phony self serving charlatans come up with simple embarrassing ideas—go away—Bridgeport, Hartford or Windham may need your mindless proposals—but we dont cause we lead—and we produce—we dont need any fake entrepeneurs entering the fray—our kids are too important—the dude is 31 years old—must be wise beyond his years—or is it that he realizes this is an easy way to make money—pay your dues young lad—and then pop-off—you are an embarrassment to all professionals for your fake effort—and you say you are a christian—you are not one of my christians—join us—dont make $$ off us—(maybe I am wrong)—if all these do-gooders promise not to make a dime off their idea/project then maybe we can talk—cause then it will be GOD’S work—and thats what I’m all about—NO STATE CHARTERS IN NEW HAVEN—Sorry—this is our city—the state can continue to screw up education in Hartford-Bridgeport and Windham—but not here—EVER—Tom Burns

posted by: Atwater on January 18, 2013  9:43am

@More Head: This will be opposed by me and it can be opposed by every citizen of Connecticut since state funding is at stake. If enough pressure is put on our elected officials then Mr. Morrisons proposal will be soundly rejected, as it should be.

I don’t mean to stomp on a person’s dreams, but when those dreams include the use of public funds to establish a religious school then I will stomp with great vigor. If, you, or Mr. Morrison, want to build another Christian school then you are free to do so, just use your own money.

posted by: Threefifths on January 18, 2013  10:55am

posted by: GregMorehead on January 17, 2013 11:49pm

@threefifths,
@elmcitydoc

First off, there is NOTHING wrong with me giving my opinion on certain matters.

But you do not have the right to give a wrong opinion and this is what you did. Also you ask the question We don’t allow prayer in schools, but when things happen in the schools, we turn around and have prayer vigils in and around the schools.  Isn’t that an oxymoron? So I answered your question with Do you homework.It’s a Myth that Prayer is Banned in Public Schoos.Organized prayer in the public school setting, whether in the classroom or at a school-sponsored event, is unconstitutional. The only type of prayer that is constitutionally permissible is private, voluntary student prayer that does not interfere with the school’s educational mission. Even The Supreme Court has never held that students cannot pray in school.

Each of you come on here, hide behind your fictitious names, and chime in on various articles that are posted

Can you prove that my name is fictitious.But I have proven that your statement on pray in school is the one that is fictitious.

posted by: HhE on January 18, 2013  3:04pm

While I strongly disagree with GregMorehead, he has the absolute right to his opinion, and its expression.  The notion he does not have a right to a “wrong” opinion is either laughable or fascist.

Are we really to believe that someone’s family or given name is “Threefifths?”

One of three New Years resolutions is shot, and it not yet February.  Here is to hoping I can lose weight and keep to a budget.

posted by: Threefifths on January 18, 2013  5:40pm

posted by: HhE on January 18, 2013 2:04pm

While I strongly disagree with GregMorehead, he has the absolute right to his opinion, and its expression.  The notion he does not have a right to a “wrong” opinion is either laughable or fascist.

He was not talking about his opinion.He said We don’t allow prayer in schools.This is a statement.Not a opinion.Also as you always say prove your point and if you read what I wrote I did just that.Mr.Morehead has not prove his point or opinion to be true.

Are we really to believe that someone’s family or given name is “Threefifths?”

And can you prove that someone’s family or given name is not Threefifths?The people of Five Percent Nation have names like God Allah,God Shammgod.Mr.Morehead plays back up for Ludacris.Bottom line prove my name is not Threefifths.

posted by: parentchoice on January 18, 2013  6:29pm

It’s amazing that the people who DO NOT have kids in New Haven public schools have the MOST to say about what’s best for other people’s children!

The issue to bring a high quality charter school to the New Haven community is not a religious thing it’s about bringing a form of a “solution” to address a community need. This pastor is stepping up to the plate and taking responsibility in helping to improve conditions in his community and offering a solution - he did not say it would save the world yet he is doing his part to help address a growing crisis.

Furthermore, the people who LIVE and work in that community should have the final say on what is best for their families!

I am shocked at the venom coming from the unions leader comment. You spend millions to control the legislative process, you don’t live in New Haven yet you fight against community empowerment! Why is that? Are you afraid that the community will become organized and more powerful because we all know where there is UNITY there is strength.

Bottom line, parents MUST do what is best for their children and parents/guardians, not anyone else, has the right to choose what school model is best for their kids…

BTW, why is New Haven leadership afraid of parent/community empowerment and parent choice?

FYI, Choice does not mean charter, it’s an individuals’ ability to choose from a variety!

posted by: Threefifths on January 18, 2013  8:16pm

posted by: parentchoice on January 18, 2013 5:29pm

It’s amazing that the people who DO NOT have kids in New Haven public schools have the MOST to say about what’s best for other people’s children!

How do you know they donot have children in the public school.Do you have any proof.Also as taxpayers we do have say.

The issue to bring a high quality charter school to the New Haven community is not a religious thing it’s about bringing a form of a “solution” to address a community need.

Did you know that studies show that charter schools are no better than public schools. A great deal of evidence exists that, on average, they are worse.Also Charter Schools create a two track education system and sow divisions within working class communities which can only benefit the elite.Case and Point If Charter Schools are so good how come they are not in the Suburbs.How about the high rate of Segregation In Charter Schools.

Choice Without Equity:
 Charter School Segregation and the Need for Civil Rights Standards.

http://civilrightsproject.ucla.edu/research/k-12-education/integration-and-diversity/choice-without-equity-2009-report

 
Furthermore, the people who LIVE and work in that community should have the final say on what is best for their families!

I agree.But from what I was told by people of the community,They were never informed.Were you?When did they call a commnunity meeting?


Bottom line, parents MUST do what is best for their children and parents/guardians, not anyone else, has the right to choose what school model is best for their kids.

Did the parents choose the charter school model or the pastor did.

This pastor is stepping up to the plate and taking responsibility in helping to improve conditions in his community and offering a solution

The Black church has failed the community.Like Dr.king said,I am very much afraid that the Christian church of today will lose its value, and it will be seen as nothing more than a social club, with no meaning and no effectiveness for our time, a form without substance.

posted by: HhE on January 18, 2013  9:37pm

3/5ths, “But you do not have the right to give a wrong opinion and this is what you did.”  Your words. 

The use and beauty of free speech is that we may all speak, and listen.  We can learn from one another, as well as learn who the jerks are. 

GregMorehead has called you out.  You may choose to tell everyone who you are, or not.  As a rule, when people do this with my use of my initials, I tell them who I am.  It is not incumbent upon me to prove who you are, or are not.  At the end of the day, your identity is of no moment or consequence to me.

posted by: Atwater on January 19, 2013  12:53pm

@parentchoice
This is not just about people who live and have children in New Haven. Charter schools are funded by the State, so the entire state should have a say in how public funds are spent. They should not be spent, per our Federal Constitution, on religious organizations, i.e. churches who want to build schools. It’s inappropriate and unconstitutional. You’re right, people who work and live in the affected community should have the final say about education. However, state tax payers should not be expected to silently fall in line when their tax money is being used.

posted by: HhE on January 19, 2013  6:56pm

I read, and then reread the article, trying to find where “religious instruction” comes in.  Rev. Eldren D. Morrison is a active pastor, but having religious views does not necessary mean teaching religion.  He plans to hold classes in a church, but that does not have to be a block.  If the school areas are secularized, then this ought to be acceptable.  (Yes, things are different now, but in the ‘70s, I went to a NYC school that was held in synagogue.  That, and my best friend being Jewish did not convert me, it just made me aware of kosher practises.) 

Research shoes that about half of all charter schools perform on par with public schools, 20% do better, and 30% not as well.  While charter schools draw the same per pupil funding as conventional public schools, they do not have to support the same level of overhead as public schools do.  What they do provide is choice and a sense of ownership for parents. 

I do not see not having a union as “just a baloney term for pocketing money for administrators at the expense of teachers.”  Rather, like most charters, this “flexibility” and long hours leads to teacher burn out, which leads to high turn over rates.

posted by: Threefifths on January 19, 2013  7:31pm

posted by: HhE on January 18, 2013 8:37pm

3/5ths, “But you do not have the right to give a wrong opinion and this is what you did.”  Your words.

The use and beauty of free speech is that we may all speak, and listen.  We can learn from one another, as well as learn who the jerks are.

When ones opinion is proven wrong,Who is the Jerk.I prove his opinion was wrong when he said We don’t allow prayer in schools with the legal opinion of The Supreme Court which has never held that students cannot pray in school. Instead, the Supreme Court has ruled that the government cannot have anything to do with prayer in schools.Students can pray quietly and silently any time.


GregMorehead has called you out.  You may choose to tell everyone who you are, or not.  As a rule, when people do this with my use of my initials, I tell them who I am.

What did GregMore head call me out about. Can you tell me?Are you speaking for him.Or maybe HHE is Real GregMorehead?


It is not incumbent upon me to prove who you are, or are not.  At the end of the day, your identity is of no moment or consequence to me.

If this is the case why did you say this.

Are we really to believe that someone’s family or given name is “Threefifths?”

Last how do you know who’s names is real or not.

posted by: Threefifths on January 19, 2013  11:29pm

@parentchoice

Here is a good read.

Tuesday, Jan 24, 2012 04:00 PM EST
The ugly truth about “school choice”

The Koch brothers want you to think the movement’s about racial justice and empowering parents. They’re lying.


http://www.salon.com/2012/01/24/the_ugly_truth_about_school_choice/

posted by: parentchoice on January 20, 2013  2:57am

@Atwater-“Charter schools are funded by the State, so the entire state should have a say in how public funds are spent.”

I agree the entire state should have a say in how public dollars are spent but where was the voice of concerned citizens like u while HUNDREDS of traditional schools continue 2 fail to educate over 40% of CT students close to 200,000 students FOR YEARS?

I did not hear your voice opposing $45,000 per inmate 4 school 2 prison pipelines, while we fund on average $15,000 per student. Responsible, non political, tax payers would want to invest in quality ed systems 2 ensure we have a qualified workforce which of course would be our future tax base 2 help stabilize the economy of our great state and country.

I would recommend, if you want to hold tax payers accountable to fiscal responsible spending then weigh in on the whole conversation and don’t just focus on charters, which is ONE form of a school model.

Furthermore, key words of our “discussion” should be Fiscal and Results based accountability for ALL schools in Connecticut.  Equal Access to opportunity for ALL children not just a selct few based on what zip code they live in.

Furthermore, I didnt read that the pastor wanted to make it a religious school. Again, we should applaud him for NOT being silent about things that matter and ALL children should matter.

CT has some high performing charter, traditional, magnet, head start, school readiness… lets replicate what is working and get rid of what is not (of course after intense interventions are applied)

Regarding charters, why not ask the question are the children that DO attend the school are they achieving and has the achievement gap been reduced or eliminated, if so then support those efforts. THOSE parents of a successful charter school have the right to choose that option for their child…NOBODY else.

There is a 2010 law that allows parents to recommend a school improvement model after three year if their school is still low performing, so I would encourage parents, community and teachers to work together in their school and consider using other intervention models that have shown success.Like it or not Charters r apart of the effort not sole solution.

Its great 2 have discussions that give multiple perspectives towards addressing a crisis & Ct’s ed system & economy is in Crisis!

posted by: Atwater on January 21, 2013  10:31am

@parentchoice:
I am concerned about education, but I believe funding should be left to municipalities, not to state tax payers. Also, I do not think that charter schools are all that they are claimed to be. What we should be doing is focusing on an improvement of local public schools, our communities, our economy and our families. There is no magic bullet for the crisis facing American youth. The failure of American schools, or Connecticut schools, reflects the failure of Connecticut families to raise young men and women who value education, respect their community and pay heed to sound guidance and advice. The schools’ failure is the parents’ failure and, in a more broad analysis, society’s failure. Throwing money at the problem will not solve it.
Finally, Mr. Morris is a pastor of a church and has proposed the creation of a school, which would be housed in the church’s facilities. This is a direct violation of the separation of church and state, no matter the level of religious instruction. It should and will be opposed on this very fundamental issue.
Anyone can recognize a problem, but few people actually want to recognize its true origins. Instead they devise schemes, though well intentioned, that do nothing to actually cure the illness, but rather only diminish the symptoms. Public schools are offered and we should do as much as we can to make them safe and efficient means of education. Those who do not want to take advantage of them can choose not to. Public schools should not be venues of social welfare, they should not be counselors or community mediators, and they should not be substitutes for the family. You come to school, you sit, you listen, you read, you learn and then you leave.

posted by: HhE on January 22, 2013  10:50am

Other than my distaste for poor argumentation, I do not know why I am bothering (but I lost two pounds this week); here we go.

“When ones opinion is proven wrong,Who is the Jerk.”  Greg Morehead certainly is not.  He advocated for a school model, and held a commonly held misbelief.  You enlightened him.  So far, so good, but to tell someone they do not have a right to a wrong opinion is rather a bit much.

“What did GregMore head call me out about. Can you tell me?Are you speaking for him.Or maybe HHE is Real GregMorehead?”  Let me start with, I do not know Greg Morehead is, so he is not me, and I am not him.  HhE is Harold Holmes Ellis.  He called you out about your identity and apparent nom de plume.  You may ignore him, deflect the challenge as you have so far, or state “I am _______ Threefifths, or Threefifths ______.” 


Allow me a correction.  It is not incumbent upon me to prove who you are, or are not.  At the end of the day, your identity is of no GREAT moment or consequence to me.

Some posters on the NHI we may never know.  Others use their name and provide a link to a home page.  Others we can identify by various comments and the like.

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