Duncan Boarders Start Getting Help Finding New Homes; Buyer Confirms Deal

Paul Bass Photos The housing authority’s relocation team Monday began meeting with 45 boarders at the Duncan Hotel as the 123-year-old landmark readies a transition to an upscale university-themed establishment.

Longtime boarders like Elaine Sands, meanwhile, began packing — and wondering if they can still find a downtown room for $200 a week or less.

“I’m going to miss it,” Sands said.

The boarders of the 92-room part-hotel, part-single-room-occupancy (SRO) boarding house at 1151 Chapel St. learned at a meeting last week that they have until Nov. 1 to vacate the premises so that a new owner can transform the building into an upscale “boutique hotel” like the Study at Yale next door.

The soon-to-be owner has hired Glendower Group — a development and management non-profit affiliate of the Housing Authority of New Haven — to help the boarders find new apartments. They scheduled one-on-one assessment meetings with the boarders beginning Monday morning and continuing through the week. (The Glendower Group has also been helping tenants of another low-income spot in the city being vacated, the 301-unit Church Street South, find new apartments.)

The soon-to-be-owner is a division of Chicago-based AJ Capital Partners called Graduate Hotels. Graduate Hotels President Tim Franzen confirmed in a conversation Monday with the Independent that his company has a contract to purchase the building. He said he can’t discuss details of the deal until it closes. But he said his division “puts together hotels that are unique in character tailored to individual markets anchored by universities.” It has built such hotels in college towns like Ann Arbor, Madison (Wisconsin), and Berkeley.

Glendower has its work cut out for it given the desire of boarders like Sands to remain living in a rapidly upscaling downtown, where relatively new developments like 360 State St. and the Novella, and others under construction, are easily filling apartments charging thousands of dollars a month. Meanwhile, SROs have disappeared.

Mayor Toni Harp Monday said her administration is committed to making sure that renters like those at the Duncan continue to be able to find homes downtown.

“One of our challenges is to make sure that can happen” as New Haven prospers, she said on her weekly appearance on WNHH radio’s “Mayor Monday” program. “If you don’t, you’re [creating] ghettos and undermining community.” She said the Ninth Square development proves that mixed-income housing can succeed downtown. She rejected the argument that lower-income renters shouldn’t be included in high-end real estate districts.

Boarders interviewed at the hotel Sunday said they pay between $170 and $240 a week for their single rooms, depending on the location within the building of the rooms and whether they have a bathroom. (Many rooms don’t; each floor has common loos.)

Developers competed to land a deal to buy the Duncan from a partnership headed by Stirling Shapiro, who, along with relatives inherited the hotel from the estate of Harold Shapiro, who died in 1987. Juan Salas, a developer whose company owns the extended-stay New Haven Village Suites on Long Wharf, was a finalist in negotiations to buy the hotel before losing out to AJ Capital.

AJ Capital in turn hired Glendower to work with tenants on finding new homes, according to Glendower Vice-President Shenae Draughn. She said AJ Capital is paying the group around $50,000 to assess renters’ finances and needs and then help them find apartments. She said Monday that the renters will be guided to private-sector apartments, not public-housing developments of Section 8 subsidies, which have long waiting lists.

Salas-Romer said several boutique developers contacted him seeking to partner on converting the hotel, given the tight market for high-end rooms. “I talked to the owner about a few weeks ago. He told me that they’re under contract” to the Chicago company, Salas-Romer said. “If it bounds back to us, great. We will pursue it.”

City Economic Developmoent Administrator Nemerson said the Harp administration stressed in discussions with potential buyers the need to help current tenants relocate. “They’re taking it very seriously. One of the things that we’ve said is we’d really like them to find places within walking distance. A lot of people there work downtown. This is one of our challenges. No city can hide from the fact that people in a boutique hotel are going to be the ones who pay for expensive restaurant meals and will be buying the art. At the same time, you want people working in the art galleries and the restaurants. We have to make sure we have a mix. That’s what it means to be a successful city.”

The question becomes: Who gets to live amid that success?

Daggett Refugee

“I thought it was going to happen for a while. I’m kind of surprised it took so long,” local musician and illustrator Kevin Sanchez Walsh said of the sale. Walsh first lived at the Duncan decades ago. More recently Walsh lived in the Daggett Street artist studio/lofts in the Hill until the city closed them down for safety reasons in May of 2017, leading him to return to the Duncan. (Daggett Street’s owner has upscaling plans, too.)

Boarders said they will miss the Duncan — because of its central location in a busy downtown, and because of what Tammie Harnett called the “family” feeling there. They praised the owners for hiring Glendower to help them find new places.

Harnett has had a special deal at the Duncan, paying about $200 a week for a room with a bathroom, because she also works there as a housekeeper. She landed at the Duncan when she moved to New Haven two years ago from North Carolina.

“Change is hard,” she said. “I’m a double whammy. I don’t have a place to live. And I won’t have a job.”

“I love it. I can afford it. I’m right here at my job. I’m safe,” she said of living at the Duncan.

Mike Stern, who’s 73, will also have trouble matching the deal he has at the Duncan.

Stern, a New Havener who reported for the New Haven Register from 1968-72, has lived at the hotel for the past 14 years. He also has his photography studio there. He has run the business, Studio Graphics, for 35 years. Now he has to find both a new home and a new studio.

Limited Options

Elaine Sanders, who’s 66, was trying to stay positive as she filled boxes in her fifth-floor apartment and prepared for her Monday morning assessment appointment with Glendower.

A retired Yale custodian, she pays $195 a week for her room, she said. She has lived at the Duncan for nine years. She is accustomed to the downtown location.

“I’m a senior citizen. I have a disability. I don’t have a car,” Sanders said. “I don’t depend on nobody. You go out the door, there’s the bus. Stop & Shop is right around the corner. Going to the doctor is right up the street for me. Two or three blocks down, there’s the movies.

John, a boarder in his 50s (he asked to have his last name kept private), moved to the Duncan from a Hamden apartment last November. Besides the convenience of living downtown without a car, he said (“I love walking”), he appreciates the Duncan’s thick walls. He’s sensitive to internal noise (though outside noise from Chapel Street doesn’t disturb him).

He contrasted the well-kept if worn Duncan to SROs in which he briefly stayed in New York, which were “seedy”; and to the more upscale Taft, where he lived in the 1990s. Unlike in the Duncan, people at the Taft didn’t generally get to know each other.

Jessica Jackson, who’s 68 and unemployed, said she has had a hard enough time meeting the $220 weekly bill at the Duncan. She said she can’t imagine where she’ll find a home next.

Nor can 61-year-old Dollette Harris, who was homeless before she came to the Duncan in April, she said. Her brother has been paying her bill at the Duncan. But she said she’s not worried because she has confidence in the relocation help she’ll receive.

Renters at the Duncan have spanned the economic spectrum. For instance, Benjamin Verdery, a world renowned musician, has stayed there for years while teaching guitar at the Yale School of Music.

In an email message, the New York-based Verdery called the Duncan his “home away from home” in New Haven.

“The Duncan had tons of personality and a history. I shall miss it,” Verdery wrote.

“I was there on hot nights and bitterly cold nights. In rain storms and blizzards. It reminded me of my grandmother’s house in that some of the floors were not even, and I loved that! I loved that none of the furniture matched. And of course that the windows opened!

“Of course who could forget the elevator, the oldest in Connecticut! If I took it, I would always make small talk with the elevator man.

“And finally the lobby. I enjoyed looking st the photos of the actors m that stayed there and The wonderful stairs going up to the front desk where Richard or Keith would greet me.”

Next Stop: The Towers?

Allan Appel Photo Steve Bradley said he has has been living at the Duncan for the last year and a half, although he has spent longer and shorter stints there ever since college in the 1980s. A former reporter with the old daily Journal Courier newspaper, Bradley is currently writing a novel and teaching driver ed.

Bradley said he wasn’t able to attend the recent meeting with management and other long-term tenants because of work obligations. “I’m not worried,” Bradley said. “If I had my way, I’d like to move to University Towers.”

Allan Appel Photo Joel Weinstein has stayed at the Duncan for the past month and a half after 30 years living at Madison Towers, where a conservator had been paying his rent. He made the move to Chapel Street after his conservator died; he’d walked by the Duncan for years, he said, never imagining he would one day live there. He attended last week’s meeting after learning of the change of ownership from a note left under room doors.

Weinstein, 73, was born in New Haven and proudly notes his membership in the Hillhouse High class of ‘61. He said he’s been a writer all his adult life with a focus on current events.

He described the Duncan experience as “pretty nice” and expressed no alarm about an impending move, in no small part because he is going to have help finding new accommodations.

“We all have counselors to relocate us to new facilities,” he said. He said he hopes that by the end of 90 days he’ll have a new place, preferably back in the nearby Madison Towers.

A Graying Old Lady

Allan Appel Photo The Duncan has remained a stubborn throwback to the old, old New Haven as the block around it, between York and Park streets, has been transformed several times over. From the remaking of the old Colony Inn into the $289-per-night boutique hotel the Study at Yale to the remaking of the old Jewish Community Center into Yale’s art school, the block that the Duncan and its residents have called home has seen an upscale makeover.

Meanwhile, the high-end housing market has exploded downtown, along with cultural offerings and expensive restaurants.

Now “there’s a shortage of hotel rooms” downtown, observed city Economic Development Administrator Matthew Nemerson. We know that the Study is sold out many times during the year. There’s definitely a need for more hotel rooms in all different price categories. That’s a very hot block now, between all the restaurants that are there and the retail that’s there, and all the arts community that’s coming for museums and events at the architecture school and the art school there. That’s one of the densest cultural blocks in New England. So it makes sense that someone would have an eye on that building.”

Nemerson said any new buyer will probably have to build under newer building codes (and want to) combine some of the current rooms that lack bathrooms.

Allan Appel Photo The Duncan’s historic threadbare ambiance has continued to entice a certain brand of visitor; at least online the hotel is still charging $130 a night, although many customers have paid less. One 2010 Yale Daily News reviewer praised it as “shabby chic.” The New York Times more recently dubbed the hotel “a down-at-the-heels dowager.”

Here’s another tribute, written by a customer named Jim L in a 2014 review posted to the Trip Advisor website:

“The Duncan is like greying old lady. Once a magnificent hotel, now an aging property still with glimpses of its greatness. The hotel is located in the heart of New Haven close to theaters, restaurants and bars. Street parking as well as garage parking is nearby. The once grand hotel is in bad need of restoration. The neon sign outside now only reads ‘can’ instead of ‘Hotel Duncan.’ The rooms are very large but very basic. Double beds and basic furnishings. Heat is via old style radiators and there was plenty of it! So much windows had to be opened on a night where it was only 18 degrees. I noticed there is no A/C in this room so you should inquire if booking during the summer season. The room was clean but if your looking for modern amenities and fancy soaps & shampoos, this is not the place. The hallways are long and narrow with basic lighting. The floors creek as you walk down the hall. The room doors are 8’ tall and all wood and the room had 12’ ceilings. Very large and open. The furnishings are very worn as was the carpet. However the rates were most affordable. in the mid 80’s a night and in downtown New Haven that is definitely below the going market rate.

“The once grand lobby is a shadow of the greatness it use to be. Deep dark wood walls, black and white tile floors, worn leather couches. Yet there is charm in ‘going back in time.’ Old pictures of the building and the city decorate the walls. Most notable is the hotel elevator and front desk key box. The elevator is the last surviving manual operated elevator in New England. It dates back well over 100 years. This means a staff person gets in the elevator with you and manually selects the floor and by holding a lever powers the elevator up to the appropriate floor. One has to admire this bit of history still being used today. Behind the front desk is an old style room key box board where room numbers are displayed over small boxes and keys for that room are located inside. Every hotel once had this system but this is the only one I even recall seeing in the past 20 years with modern key cards and security concerns.

“Overall I would say if you are a nostalgic buff and realize you’re not checking into a modern day hotel then you will enjoy stepping back in time to a once great hotel.

“Room Tip: The elevator stops working about 10 PM. So if you’re going to be out late realize you will have to walk ...”

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posted by: Esbey on August 4, 2017  6:06pm

This seems like it was inevitable.  Clicking through to the apparent developers website, they seem to do good things and one might guess that they would use their “Graduate Hotel” brand here as they do in other college towns. 

It is good that the owners are working with their long-term tenants to find other housing, it seems the residents are optimistic about finding new places.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 4, 2017  6:56pm

In the words of the actor Laurence Fishburne from the movie Searching for Bobby Fisher.

THERE IT IS.

https://youtu.be/FjheHtlVf7A

I told you all.The poor will be push out from Down town due to the take over by the gentrification vampires.I keep telling all of you. New Haven is in the second Stage of gentrification.

Gentrification Town

https://youtu.be/b5vfGvqO5SA

My bad. Heard from people I know who live in ninth square apartments.They will be the next to be displaced.

posted by: Dwightstreeter on August 4, 2017  7:07pm

This space reserved for Three Fifths.

posted by: wendy1 on August 4, 2017  7:17pm

Before I pay more for a room than The Study, I want a steam room, pool, and massage service as well as night time snacks.  A true boutique would offer all these percs and more——fancy little soaps and wet bars with fridges and tight security….maybe a gift shop and a barber or a manicurist….small pets allowed except for bedbugs and lice.

posted by: robn on August 4, 2017  7:51pm

If you take the quoted rate of $130/night and cut it in half, that’s still almost $2000 per month. How could a poor person afford this?

posted by: Kevin McCarthy on August 4, 2017  8:25pm

Anyone else find it ironic that this story was posted almost simultaneously as one on a homeless encampment?

posted by: 1644 on August 5, 2017  7:58am

In the 1970’s, it was rumored to be the favorite lodging of stars working at the Rep and Long Wharf.  The Trip Advisor reviews are a riot.  There are lots of folks who cannot live without w-fi, and lots who don’t realize how rare a room under $200 is in New Haven.  I had some out-of-town relatives stay there a while ago, and it was fine.  I hope the renovation doesn’t destroy the charm, like the elevator and that telephone.  Building codes, the ADA, and building inspectors are the enemy of historic preservation and eye-catching architecture.  Here’s an example of what can be built when we don’t reach for the lowest common denominator:
https://www.inexhibit.com/case-studies/danish-national-maritime-museum/

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 5, 2017  10:14am

This is the same crap they did to the people in the SRO on the Bowery in New York.

Down and Out and ... Up and In on the Bowery

From the Whitehouse Hotel, the street’s last SRO, to the door (manned by red-coated doormen) of the Bowery Hotel is only 35 steps for a reporter—but a giant leap into the rebranded, denatured future of America’s greatest skid row.Top: The Whitehouse Hotel, rooms $9 to $54 a night. Bottom: The Bowery Hotel, rooms $425 to $1,200 a night. Photographs by Michael Edwards

http://nymag.com/news/features/41818/


How Hipsters Ruined the Bowery

One of the more significant projects was delivered by the Avalon Bay Communities, a massive real estate developer from Virginia. Avalon built four luxury buildings in the 2000s that now resemble the crown jewels of gentrification in the Bowery, including the nine-story monstrosity at Bowery and Houston that’s became home to the area’s first Whole Foods in 2007.It should be made very clear here that, while iPhone-toting hipsters bought broccoli rabe inside the overpriced grocery store, the area’s remaining homeless population still lined up for soup just a couple blocks away.

http://gizmodo.com/how-hipsters-ruined-the-bowery-1538101252

Soon it will be How the Elite and Hipsters Ruined Downtown New Haven.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 5, 2017  10:20am

posted by: Esbey on August 4, 2017 6:06pm

This seems like it was inevitable.  Clicking through to the apparent developers website, they seem to do good things and one might guess that they would use their “Graduate Hotel” brand here as they do in other college towns.

It is inevitable due to the gentrification vampires with the help of Judas Goat Politicians are taking over Downtown and the rest of New Haven.


It is good that the owners are working with their long-term tenants to find other housing, it seems the residents are optimistic about finding new places.

Help them find new places.They can not even find places for the homeless on the green.

posted by: robn on August 5, 2017  1:34pm

3/5,

Did you ever think that maybe poor people in NHV are poor specifically because there’s no economic activity? Economic activity that would begin to happen with the imported capital that these so called hipsters (3/5 dog whistle folks) bring?

posted by: jim1 on August 5, 2017  6:12pm

Yale should take it over.  They could put the students that can’t pay room and board at the new dorms.
Stick them in the Duncan.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 5, 2017  7:10pm

posted by: robn on August 5, 2017 1:34pm

3/5,

Did you ever think that maybe poor people in NHV are poor specifically because there’s no economic activity?

Low wage jobs are now the majority of all jobs in the USA. You can talk about responsibility all you want if you cannot make a living, you can’t be responsible. Not everyone can go to college, and even college grads are working low wage jobs.Also The Predatory Nature of Capitalism Using your words dog whistle folks. that seeks to create Institutions that can best exploit the vulnerabilities of the masses. This is facilitated if the masses are kept poor enough that they are vulnerable and unable to escape their circumstances.

Economic activity that would begin to happen with the imported capital that these so called hipsters (3/5 dog whistle folks) bring?

Hipster Harlem Shake

https://youtu.be/KLdfjKexlpY

posted by: Jonathan Hopkins on August 5, 2017  7:26pm

Let’s keep in mind that the Hotel Duncan was built at a time when Yale University was expanding in the Chapel Street area, but prior to the implementation of the undergraduate residential college system. In large part, the Hotel Duncan was built to house Yale students, 50% of whom did not live on campus in 1900 because of a lack of student housing.

Chapel Street was the main commercial shopping street in early 20th century New Haven - equipped with several department stores, including Malley’s and Shartenberg’s. This was New Haven’s Fifth Avenue and throughout the late 19th and early 20th century higher end establishments (hotel, shops, and apartments) crept up from State Street and the Green along Chapel Street to the vicinity of Dwight Street. By the mid-20th century, the market for higher end urban retail had faded and Chapel Street’s ritzy character began to recede back Downtown - getting replaced with vacant storefronts, lower rent retail shops, and rooming houses.

In recent years, higher end restaurants, bars, hotels, and offices have moved back into the corridor. Chapel Streets seems to be experiencing a familiar urban story of ebb and flow between more upscale, higher end establishment to more discount, lower rent uses and then back again.

posted by: TheMadcap on August 5, 2017  9:34pm

. How could a poor person afford this?


They sign a much cheaper month long lease vs paying the nightly fee

posted by: cellardoor on August 5, 2017  9:40pm

ThreeFifths, I am not sure how you have it figured that downtown private property should be dedicated to a purpose that suits you, without your having made any investment in that property, past or present or future.  The historical perspective that Jonathan Hopkins provides is helpful:  the value of land and buildings fluctuates with the prospects of cities, and the uses of those properties change over time.  Your commentary is remarkably one-note, and self-serving.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 5, 2017  10:47pm

ThreeFifths, I am not sure how you have it figured that downtown private property should be dedicated to a purpose that suits you, without your having made any investment in that property, past or present or future.

Where did I say it suits me?

The historical perspective that Jonathan Hopkins provides is helpful:  the value of land and buildings fluctuates with the prospects of cities, and the uses of those properties change over time. 

The historical perspective is no longer going to be there.

Your commentary is remarkably one-note, and self-serving.

Correct.The note is call gentrification vampires and displacement.May be if you open your cellard oor you would see what I am talking about.

posted by: Bill Saunders on August 6, 2017  2:28am

Madcap,

Exactly,  Robn has to understand that his position limits him to corporate deals…..
Other people can get better ones, if they have a commitment to living….....

posted by: robn on August 6, 2017  7:19am

MADCAP,

Ok but still if the discount rate for long term is even steeper, say 25%, that still $1000 a month which, combined with a roommates, can get you one of the nicest 2BR in East Rock.

posted by: robn on August 6, 2017  9:09am

Does anyone know the actual rent in this building for long term tenants? That would help put this in perspective.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 6, 2017  10:02am

posted by: TheMadcap on August 5, 2017 9:34pm

How could a poor person afford this?


They sign a much cheaper month long lease vs paying the nightly fee

You are Correct. In fact in some parts of the country SRO housing. The rents for poor tenants may be paid in full or in part by charitable, state, or federal programs, giving incentive to landlords to accept such tenants. Also some SRO buildings are renovated with the benefit of a tax abatement, with the condition that the rooms be rented to tenants with low incomes, and sometimes specific low-income groups, such as homeless people, people with mental illness, people with AIDS.

posted by: mcg2000 on August 6, 2017  10:59am

Robn, perhaps these low income tenants rent rooms from the Duncan instead of teaming up to get a nice East Rock apartment because maybe the Duncan doesn’t require the same security deposit, credit check, etc. that the East Rock landlord would.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 6, 2017  11:03am

“We all have counselors to relocate us to new facilities,” he said. He said he hopes that by the end of 90 days he’ll have a new place, preferably back in the nearby Madison Towers.

Do not drink the Kool-Aid.There are selling you Snake-Oil and Three Card Monte.This will be all of you.

Gentrification Affects Everyone the Same Way, Huh?

https://youtu.be/YHLUCKCybVc

posted by: jim1 on August 6, 2017  11:15am

Don’t think there is a rate..  If you are well dressed high, if your section 8 real high, {the town or state will pay}.

[Paul: Based on what boarders told me, the rents for boarder range from around $170 to $240 a week, depending on whether the room has a bathroom and where in the building the room is located.]

posted by: mcg2000 on August 6, 2017  11:19am

Also, if someone has other stressors in life, he or she may not want a large apartment to have to furnish and keep clean. The hotel rooms are furnished and I imagine housekeeping cleans the room. Not to mention the a share bathroom would be the hotel’s responsibility to clean. Also, while the rooms don’t come with kitchens, someone who chooses to live there may not be interested in cooking and baking and the ancillary tasks involved in food preparation like grocery shopping.

posted by: robn on August 6, 2017  5:16pm

MCG2000,

I’m just trying to understand if the claims of gentrification are right but it doesn’t sound like they are. It sounds like the long term tenant rents being paid are equivalent to mediocre to very nice ER apartments so these long term tenants still have many choices.
The biggest change will be conversion of those units to pure hotel, a general renovation, and a higher end hotel in place of a lower end. So in essence, the landowners will be disappointing budget travelers, and long term tenants who already have financial means that give them many choices.
Nostalgia issues aside (and 3/5 constant poverty pornography), the bottom line is that no one is being cheated or exploited.

posted by: 1644 on August 6, 2017  5:45pm

One can still find a small apartment in many greater New haven communities for $900-$1000/mo.  Location wise, though,  it’s hard to beat the Duncan for someone who wants an urban environment.  Here is a whole house for $1K/mo.
https://newhaven.craigslist.org/apa/d/this-is-an-adorable-dollhouse/6252837137.html

posted by: 1644 on August 6, 2017  8:11pm

A furnished studio not far from the Duncan for $750/mo:
https://newhaven.craigslist.org/apa/d/furnished-1-br-studio-close/6212794552.html

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 6, 2017  8:35pm

posted by: robn on August 6, 2017 5:16pm

Nostalgia issues aside (and 3/5 constant poverty pornography), the bottom line is that no one is being cheated or exploited.

The people who do not want to leave the Hotel Duncan.I heard a lot of them do not want to leave.The people who were in Church Street South were cheated and. exploited.Like ti or not these Occupants in the Hotel Duncan are being displace.

My bad. Would you say this Family is not being cheated or exploited.

Tenants Living Amid Rubble in Rent-Regulated Apartment War

After 23 years of living in their rent-stabilized apartment, Noelia Calero and her family are fighting to stay. The landlord, they say, is using intimidating tactics to push them out.

The letter from the landlord said he needed access to the apartments for a couple of weeks to make repairs.The worker who showed up the next morning was armed with a sledgehammer and an electric saw, the tenants said he took just hours to destroy the kitchens and the bathrooms. When the worker was done, the tenants in 1L could see the building’s basement through the remnants of their kitchen floor.Eight months later, the kitchens and bathrooms in Apartments 1L and 1R, two rent-stabilized units on the ground floor of a six-unit building in Bushwick


https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/25/nyregion/in-new-york-push-for-market-rate-housing-pits-landlords-against-tenants.html?_r=0

posted by: robn on August 6, 2017  8:54pm

3\5,

There’s a solution to not wanting to leave someplace; buy it. Otherwise, renting is a temporary contract. No cheating or exploitation in this story; just the end of a business relationship between renters and landlord.

posted by: mcg2000 on August 6, 2017  9:38pm

Robn,
Someone renting a room in a rooming house may be pretty far removed from the path to home ownership. Aside from the good credit needed to get a mortgage and the money needed for a down payment, property taxes , maintenance, etc., home ownership requires someone able and willing to maintain their homes.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 6, 2017  9:56pm

posted by: robn on August 6, 2017 8:54pm

3\5,

There’s a solution to not wanting to leave someplace; buy it. Otherwise, renting is a temporary contract. No cheating or exploitation in this story; just the end of a business relationship between renters and landlord.

Everyone can not buy.

posted by: 1644 on August 6, 2017 8:11pm

A furnished studio not far from the Duncan for $750/mo:

https://newhaven.craigslist.org/apa/d/furnished-1-br-studio-close/6212794552.html


How to Spot Apartment Scams on Craigslist

How to Spot Apartment Scams on Craigslist. Apartment scams on Craigslist take advantage of those looking for a deal and a new home. Typically, the scam starts when a scammer posts an unbeatable deal on an apartment and a person responds. Read the following tips to learn how to spot apartment scams on Craigslist and to spare yourself the loss of money and a home.

https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-spot-apartment-scams-on-craigslist

CraigsList Rental Scams

The Better Business Bureau advises to be on the lookout for the following for avoiding Craigslist apartment rental scams:

•The email addresses they use usually are from yahoo, ymail, rocketmail, fastermail, live, hotmail and gmail, and they also post ads under anonymous craigslist addresses. They frequently change their aliases.

https://www.cambridgema.gov/cpd/communityresources/CrimePrevention/craigslistscams.aspx

posted by: robn on August 6, 2017  10:17pm

MCG3000,

You seem to admit that ownership is a far greater commitment, but then suggest that renters should get the same luxury of permanence that owners enjoy without the same commitment. How is that fair?

posted by: GroveStreet on August 7, 2017  7:22am

Everyone — mostly Yale — has the responsibility of making sure that poor people have great living space in the choicest places downtown, except the poor people, who have no responsibility in striving to make their economic situation better.

Got it, NHI and its commenters. Hipsters and gentrifying vampires suck. Poor people who haven’t improved their conditions are wonderful. The people who pee on the trees on The Green midday? Let’s feed them and give them blankets. And let’s make Yale pay for it.

City filled with idiots.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 7, 2017  8:22am

posted by: robn on August 6, 2017 10:17pm

MCG3000,

You seem to admit that ownership is a far greater commitment, but then suggest that renters should get the same luxury of permanence that owners enjoy without the same commitment. How is that fair?

Renters Have Legal Rights

May 2017
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Booklet: English,
Spanish
More Information
All renters (also called tenants) have legal rights. You have these rights even if

you do not have a written lease agreement,
you signed an agreement, or
you told your landlord you will give up your rights.

Your landlord must:

1.  Follow all health and safety laws so that the building, apartments, and common areas are safe. Common areas include the driveway, yard, halls, and laundry rooms.
2.  Make all repairs needed to keep your apartment fit and livable.
3.  Keep all electrical, plumbing, heating, ventilation, appliances, and other landlord-supplied features (such as elevators and appliances) working and safe.
4.  Provide containers for trash and arrange for its removal.
5.  Supply heat, running water, and hot water. (A landlord may require to you to pay for gas, oil, electricity, or water.)
6.  Repair cracked, chipped, or peeling paint and remove paint that contains dangerous and illegal amounts of lead. Lead is very dangerous for small children and pregnant women. To learn more, see Lead Poisoning below. And call your Health Department if you are worried about lead in your apartment.

If your landlord does not do one or more of these things, you have the right to complain to your town’s housing code enforcement agency. If repairs are still not made after you complain, you may sue your landlord, pay your rent to the court, and ask the court to order a refund

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 7, 2017  8:36am

posted by: GroveStreet on August 7, 2017 7:22a.m.

Got it, NHI and its commenters. Hipsters and gentrifying vampires suck. Poor people who haven’t improved their conditions are wonderful. The people who pee on the trees on The Green midday? Let’s feed them and give them blankets. And let’s make Yale pay for it.

Hipsters Will Get Drunk and Start Rapping in Public

Public consumption of alcohol is totally chill right now, but once drunk hipsters on the streets of Brooklyn start displaying rap hands and spitting verses like their ultimate ‘round the way girl, Taylor Swift, all bets are off. Law enforcement needs to get involved immediately.

Even the rich like to pee.in the street.
A Tidal Wave of Urine Will Flow Down Park Ave.

Last year at this time, summonses for acts like public urination were 94 percent higher. Some could argue the number reflects the fact that public urination lost its appeal in 2014. They’d be wrong. We’re still pissing in the streets. According this highly entertaining 1989 New York Times report, we’ve always loved to piss in the streets. We’re just not getting in trouble for our “noxious emission of liquids” in 2015.Once rivers of piss start running down the street, we’ll consider calling 911

Poor people who haven’t improved their conditions are wonderful.

How about those in power who do not want to raise the minimum wage that could help some to improved their conditions.

And let’s make Yale pay for it.

How about making yale pay for this.

Yale’s tax exempt New Haven property worth $2.5 billion.

posted by: robn on August 7, 2017  8:50am

3/5,

The right to quiet enjoyment of the premises ends when the lease ends. There is no legal guarantee of permanence.

posted by: NewHaven18 on August 7, 2017  8:55am

I am very disappointed by this comment section. Not one link to an UrbanDictionary or Wikipedia page about how bike lanes and bicycling lower male fertility, SMH.

posted by: Anderson Scooper on August 7, 2017  9:04am

Is Yale a silent partner in one of these proposed deals?

Owning pretty much that entire block, and everything immediately surrounding the Duncan, it’s hard to imagine the institution wouldn’t spend whatever was necessary to gain long-term control of that parcel.

For what it’s worth.

posted by: eliantonio on August 7, 2017  9:36am

When I got separated and divorced ten years ago I stayed at the Duncan for two months.  It was ,$220 a week, but I didn’t have to put down a deposit, didn’t have to get electric heat and cable turned on and I got to live in a neighborhood I couldn’t afford an apartment in.
I look back fondly on my short time there the room , was like a cross between drugstore cowboy and taxi driver, gritty and old school, but loaded with character

posted by: Dwightstreeter on August 7, 2017  9:46am

@NewHaven18: headlines about male fertility say it is down across the US. They can’t all be bicyclists!

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 7, 2017  9:53am

posted by: robn on August 7, 2017 8:50am

3/5,

The right to quiet enjoyment of the premises ends when the lease ends. There is no legal guarantee of permanence.

Correct. But permanence is the new greedy approach to displacement that systematically dismantles entire communities.

posted by: 1644 on August 7, 2017  10:28am

3/5: None of those rights include the right to remain after the period of the lease expires.  Eviction of elderly and physically disabled tenants requires good cause, as do RAP and section 8 leases, but otherwise a landlord does not need good cause but may evict for lapse of time.  In any case, a landlord may evict a tenant if he is going to permanently remove a dwelling from the housing market, as is happening here.
Regarding Craiglist, I have heard of scams, but they are easily guarded against by local renters: just check the land records and id of putative landlords.  Besides, not using Craigslist because some ads may be scams is like not breathing air because some air is polluted.  Craigslist is the primary marketplace for housing today.

posted by: cellardoor on August 7, 2017  11:38am

GroveStreet:

“City filled with idiots.”  Your comment reveals more about yourself than about New Haven.  There aren’t many small, diverse, and vibrant cities that aren’t struggling with the issues discussed at length by these commenters, most of whom are thoughtful,  and New Haven is—in the opinion of many of us who have made longterm commitments to this place—a great place to call home.  Feel free to share how you have made things better, here or anywhere.

posted by: robn on August 7, 2017  12:27pm

3/5,

I think you mean “impermanence” and if you do, you’re dead wrong. Impermanence is now and has always been the fundamental aspect of renting. Renters have less responsibility and freedom to go where they want after their lease is expired but for that they sacrifice equity and permanence. Landlords have the comfort of property ownership and potential rental income but for that they sacrifice the security of capital which has been invested in the rental property and knowing whether or not their tenants will remain.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 7, 2017  5:51pm

The boarders of the 92-room part-hotel, part-single-room-occupancy (SRO) boarding house at 1151 Chapel St. learned at a meeting last week that they have until Nov. 1 to vacate the premises so that a new owner can transform the building into an upscale “boutique hotel” like the Study at Yale next door.

You got to l,ove displacement.@ 1644 and Robin.my point was that when gentrification comes in so does displacement. And that is what is happing with these Boarders is.displacement. As gentrification comes in more to downtown you will see more people being displace.Keep a eye on Residences at Ninth Square.They are the next group to be displace.

City Economic Developmoent Administrator Nemerson said the Harp administration stressed in discussions with potential buyers the need to help current tenants relocate.

Snake Oil Salesman

https://youtu.be/wD3xhzuTrhA

My bad Cedar Hill just send this to me.Like I said New haven is in the second stage of gentrification.

It is NOW happening in Cedar Hill to! WTF. A semi slumlord….must be trying to go high end now…redid a building…he said he was going to high end with it…we kinda laughed…high end yale apt in Cedar Hill…yeah right….WELLLL he did just that $1000 for a 300sq studio! dam in Cedar Hill a 2 bedroom apt goes for that. But it is high end and has all the bells and whispers. I own over here….and I actually fear the taxes going up if the area does a turn around. It will be the nail in my poor homeowners coffins. uggg

posted by: Dwightstreeter on August 9, 2017  8:53am

@robn: I’ve personally seen photos of housing violations that existed a few years ago at the Grand Ave. Shelter and spoken with a former resident there.
        The complaints from Columbus House involve the rigid rules and hours.
        We need Single Room Occupancy housing or zoning for things like tiny houses. Right now some people can’t qualify for housing because they drink or smoke. A Housing First approach would put them in a stable situation regardless, then deal with their other problems.
        Some people are simply too ill with too many behavioral and health issues to fit into standard resources.
        We can let them live and die on the streets or under a bridge or we can provide them with shelter.
        This is a huge burden on one city and federal funds come with requirements that not everyone fits.
        Such a wealthy country, but not a good place to lose one’s place in a job or a home.

posted by: Anonymous Bosh on August 9, 2017  9:12am

Ohh! Ohh! Ohh! I am overcome. Frickin’ Schumpeter.

I *love* the Duncan. Every stay was memorable (a double-edged sword). 2 a.m. discourses on Mario Lanza. The Old Heidelberg (the “poor man’s Mory’s”).

O, I die, Horatio!
The potent poison quite o’ercrows my spirit.
I cannot live to hear the news from New England
Look there, look there. O, O, O, O.