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Pit Bull Attacks Cop

by Staff | Jul 11, 2014 8:10 am

(29) Comments | Commenting has been closed | E-mail the Author

Posted to: Legal Writes

With a dog’s jaws locked on his left leg, Officer Michael Haines drew his gun.

Haines was responding to a report of a vicious dog on the loose, and got a close look at the problem canine.

Here’s what happened, according to police spokesman Officer Dave Hartman:

At 7:17 p.m. on Wednesday, someone called police to report a “vicious dog” that couldn’t be controlled by its owner. Officer Haines responded with Brendan Borer (pictured). The dog’s owner flagged them down in College Woods park in East Rock. The owner told them the dog, a pit bull, had escaped from his car and was acting dangerously. He told cops he was afraid for the safety of anyone nearby.

As the cops warned people in the park, the dog charged at Haines and attacked him, biting down on his leg. Haines pulled his gun and shot the dog twice.

Haines was taken to the hospital for treatment of a non-life-threatening injury. The dead dog was taken to the animal shelter for rabies testing.

No one else was hurt. The dog’s owner was not charged with a crime.

In other police news, according to Hartman:

Boyfriend Comes Armed: At 8:43 p.m. on Wednesday Officers Thomas Glynn and Matthew Collier responded to a report of a domestic dispute on Young Street.

The woman who had called told the cops that her estranged boyfriend, the father of her children, had knocked on her door. He told her he wanted to work things out, then threatened a guest of the woman. She told him to leave. He left.

Minutes later, a neighbor texted the woman: “Lock the door. [The boyfriend] has a gun.”

As cops spoke with the woman, Officer Joseph Staffieri spotted a man peaking out of the window of a house across the street. It was the boyfriend.

Cops knocked on the door of the house. They found the man sitting on the floor inside. They found a Galaxy BB gun in a kitchen drawer. The man admitted retrieving it from his car, but denied threatening anyone with it.

Police arrested the man for carrying a dangerous weapon, brandishing a facsimile firearm, breach of peace, threatening, and criminal trespassing.

Cops Nab Gun: At 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Officers Ryan Macuirzynski and Louis DeCrescenzo spotted a suspicious vehicle in the area of English and Rowe streets. The 21-year-old driver had weed in his pocket. He took off running when cops found a High Standard Sentinel MK IV .22 caliber Magnum revolver in his glove compartment.

Cops tackled the man into a fence. They struggled with the man, who is six-foot-three and 220 pounds, and used a Taser on him. Four cops eventually got him into handcuffs.

The man is a convicted felon and thus not allowed to have a gun. Police arrested him for interfering with police, operating a car without a license, possession of less than half an ounce of marijuana, having a weapon in a car, criminal possession of a firearm, and carrying a pistol without a permit.

Stabbing: At 2:50 a.m. on Thursday, Officers Jacob Cedeno, Christopher Cacela, Jonathan Lamb and Dalila Ortiz responded to a home on Hobart Street on a report of someone stabbed in the neck.

The victim, a 22-year-old woman, held a towel to her neck. She told cops another woman had stabbed her during an argument.

The accused woman emerged from the front door. A trail of blood drops led upstairs to a knife.

Cops were told the fight involved a car with a flattened tire and a punch.

Police arrested the accused woman for assault, carrying a dangerous weapon, criminal mischief, and breach of peace.

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posted by: Threefifths on July 10, 2014  4:50pm

I will keep saying.If you have these types of dogs,You should have a one hundred thousand dollar ins bond.Or better yet do like the do in the UK ban these type of dogs.


The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 (c. 65) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that was introduced in response to various incidents of serious injury or death resulting from attacks by aggressive and uncontrolled dogs, particularly on children

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dangerous_Dogs_Act_1991

posted by: moegard on July 10, 2014  6:11pm

Unfortunately, I witnessed this shooting of the pit bull. Wouldn’t it have been possible to tase the dog, or use Animal Control instead of discharging a deadly weapon twice on a busy street? The animal did not die immediately either, but howled and suffered for at least several minutes after half his face was shot off.

posted by: Gretchen Pritchard on July 10, 2014  8:18pm

It seems a little irresponsible to say that “the rabid dog charged at Haines and attacked him, biting down on his leg.”  I realize that your use of “rabid” may not be meant literally, but it certainly sounds as if you are saying the dog actually had rabies, for which, as the article makes clear, there is as yet no proof.

I hope Officer Haines makes a quick recovery, and lab tests for rabies in the dog come back negative.  It would be interesting to learn more of the back story—how long the owner had had this dog, and whether it had previously been aggressive or uncontrollable.  At least the owner was responsible enough to call the cops on his own dog.

[Ed. note: “Rabid” was an error. Fixed now. Thanks!]

posted by: robn on July 10, 2014  11:01pm

1) There have been lots of media reports lately about irresponsible police officers needlessly shooting dogs. This doesn’t seem like one of those times and thank goodness the NHPD thinks before it uses a weapon.
2) “Rabid”, is a medical term describing an animal affected by a virus. This sounds more like this dog was “vicious” or “ferocious”.

posted by: Daxtons Friends on July 11, 2014  9:44am

Daxton’s Friends serves as a resource for legislators and legislation bodies addressing canine related public safety. Our goal is to support the implementation of tools to ensure healthy canine ownership and public safety.

The ‘bull and terrier’ type was originally developed in England in the early 19th century. The lineage goes back to the mastiff / molosser types, including what we now call the Olde English Bulldogge, that were used for bear-, bull- and horse-baiting from the 12th through the 18th century. This isn’t the bear-baiting we think of today, when hunters feed bears in order to bring them out in the open to shoot them. Rather, the bear, bull or horse was confined in a public arena where the mastiff ‘bulldogs’ would slowly tear them apart alive for the public’s amusement1,2,3,4,5.
The popularity of this ‘sport’ declined as education became more emphasized in urban society of the Industrial Revolution and literacy among the population grew (from about 30% in the 17th century to 62% by 1800)6.  The ‘sport’ was banned altogether by Act of Parliament in 1835.
The lovers of blood ‘sports’ turned to dogfighting to satisfy their fancy, breeding the large, mastiff-type bulldogs to smaller working terriers to get dogs both smaller and more agile, easier to keep and to hide, but just as willing to attack and fight to the death. With the rise of the kennel clubs and the desire to distinguish dogs by looks and pedigree as well as by performance, this ‘bull and terrier’ type eventually divided into many official breeds. They all share the same ancestry and function, distinguishing themselves mostly by slight differences in appearance.
The American Pit Bull Terrier is, like all the ‘bully’ breeds, one of this group of descendants of the British ‘bull and terrier’ type fighting bulldogs. Once imported into the United States, it was bred up to be bigger again, and again used in baiting animals and in dogfighting. The American Kennel Club (founded 1884) was unwilling to

posted by: MsLaur on July 11, 2014  10:12am

Having come upon this scene as it unfolded Wednesday evening I was charged several times by the dog.  If it hadn’t been for the bicycle, which I used as a shield, the dog would have mauled me for sure.  I’m sorry that the officer was bitten, and I hope he makes a full recovery.
As a dog owner myself I take full responsibility for my own dog’s behavior.  He stays on a leash at all times, per the law.

posted by: Ndog on July 11, 2014  1:01pm

Dogs need to be under control at all times. So do police officers and journalists. We all can do better. Control your dog, don’t use guns when other options are and should be available and please don’t be racist/breedist against ALL “pitbulls”. All animals are individuals, just like us humans, and don’t deserve a bad rap that just perpetuates stereotypes that hurt the innocent. Try ‘Dog attacks cop’ next time as a better headline if you must print it at all. And again, dog owners need to be responsible.

posted by: 1644 on July 11, 2014  4:30pm

Threefifths: Liability insurance is a good idea for all dog owners, but it would be much more expensive for pit bull owners.
Moeguard;  Give the officer a break.  According to the article, the dog was actually biting him when he shot it.  It would have been good to deliver a coup de grace after the dog released, but I suspect the officer was dealing with his own injury rather than the dog’s. 
Robn: I agree the shooting was justified.  Nice to see they only used a taser, not a gun to subdue the unarmed human as well.  And they only used the taser after just wrestling him did not work.  All in all, a good escalation of force from NHPD, in contrast with so many cops who use more lethal force than needed.
Ndog: Yes, dogs should be under control at all times.  But all dogs will escape physical controls, and sometimes ignore voice or hand commands.  But this breed seems particularly prone to unprovoked attacks.  Somewhat analogous to cars:  all can be dangerous, all should avoid collisions. Yet collisions do happen, so we have banned some cars,  such as Pintos and Corvairs, as unreasonably dangerous.

posted by: Threefifths on July 11, 2014  5:25pm

posted by: 1644 on July 11, 2014 4:30pm

Threefifths: Liability insurance is a good idea for all dog owners, but it would be much more expensive for pit bull owners.

And how about the high medical bills for the person who is bite?

posted by: 1644 on July 12, 2014  6:16am

Threefifths:  The medical expenses would be covered by the liability insurance.  Moreover, the higher price for pit bull insurance would steer folks toward other, less dangerous breeds, so overall one would hope we have fewer dog bites.

posted by: moegard on July 12, 2014  9:22am

1644 You say “According to the article the dog was actually biting him when he shot it”.
I was there in person (unlike the author of the article) and that’s not what I saw.

posted by: RickyCT203 on July 12, 2014  12:27pm

Ndog said “...please don’t be racist/breedist against ALL “pitbulls”. All animals are individuals, just like us humans, and don’t deserve a bad rap that just perpetuates stereotypes that hurt the innocent… Try ‘Dog attacks cop’ next time as a better headline if you must print it at all… “

Yet if it’s a Black or Hispanic human, we have no problem with that description in the headline. Do animal rights supersede human rights? Or is it really just a detailed description?

posted by: Ndog on July 12, 2014  1:18pm

Threefifths: Have you considered the role of society in the ‘pitbull’ problem? Have you been to the NH animal shelter lately? Wonder how much cash goes into making that a state of the art facility? Have you volunteered there and seen the sweet faces of the many ‘pitbulls’ that never get a chance because WE continue to rant about banning them instead of working toward a compassionate solution? Yes there is a problem. WE are the problem. How about ‘banning’ the races/breeds of people who are in the ‘news’ the most for criminal activity? Would that be a good solution? But wait, that doesn’t seem fair now does it? People are individuals who shouldn’t be lumped together by their race/breed and judged by what is seen in the media or ‘proven’ by statistics. True understanding comes when we step outside what stereotypes/media tell us and get to know individuals.
Perpetuation of stereotypes does no one any good. My main issue is the spreading of FEAR. This is a detriment to all of us.
Banning or punishing (insurance requirements) GOOD owners and dogs that never had a chance is NOT a solution.

posted by: cedarhillresident! on July 12, 2014  6:48pm

I have had the pleasure of meeting both officers at the cedar hill block watch meeting. Both officers are the kind of officers we need in New Haven. With that said I have to believe that with everything my community members have said about them….the shooting was the only option. I hope Haines has a speedy recovery.

As for pinning this on a bread of dog….I totally disagree… I know far to many people that have pit bulls and EVERYONE of them are goofy doofy dogs. I personally am more afraid of chiwawa’s than pit bulls (high stung little buggers).
In the end they are animals. And even the best dog, cat, ferret… can have it’s instincts kick in and react defensively. Even if the dog is not rapid…maybe the car ride could of spooked it. It could of been ill and was not feeling well. Ya just never know….but to blame it on a breed is wrong.

posted by: Threefifths on July 12, 2014  7:48pm

To all who have said I was talking about Pit bulls.Here is what I said.If you have these types of dogs,You should have a one hundred thousand dollar ins bond.Or better yet do like the do in the UK ban these type of dogs.

The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 (c. 65) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that was introduced in response to various incidents of serious injury or death resulting from attacks by aggressive and uncontrolled dogs, particularly on children

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dangerous_Dogs_Act_1991

Now if you look at the above website,You will see not just pitbulls,But other Danerous dogs who have a high rate of biting and attacking people.Now also I said You should have a one hundred thousand dollar ins bond.Now what is wroug with having a ins bond for you dog if he bites or attack so one.

posted by: 1644 on July 12, 2014 6:16am

Threefifths:  The medical expenses would be covered by the liability insurance.  Moreover, the higher price for pit bull insurance would steer folks toward other, less dangerous breeds, so overall one would hope we have fewer dog bites.

What about the people who donot own homes that live in a apartment.The major of them have no liability insurance to cover there dog if the dog bites some one.

posted by: Ndog on July 12, 2014 1:18pm

Threefifths: Have you considered the role of society in the ‘pitbull’ problem? Have you been to the NH animal shelter lately? Wonder how much cash goes into making that a state of the art facility? Have you volunteered there and seen the sweet faces of the many ‘pitbulls’ that never get a chance because WE continue to rant about banning

Have you every seen some one bite and maul by one of these Dangerous Dog breeds.

Neighbours Pit Bull attacks 8 year old boy excuses, excuses, excuses!!!

http://youtu.be/a3HF_ewmY-o

Graphic Footage of Pit Bull dog attacking Policemen

http://youtu.be/auk1MfjHT9Q

posted by: Gretchen Pritchard on July 12, 2014  9:20pm

Dog breeders over many centuries deliberately selected among their animals for a certain body type and certain traits, and reinforced those traits through selective breeding. 

Herd dogs like Border collies were deliberately bred for an extremely strong manifestation of the herding instinct. Hunting hounds were bred for a powerful urge to track by smell; greyhounds for speed; retrievers for fetching (including plunging into cold water to catch the prize) ... and fighting dogs—a group that includes pit bulls—were selected for traits that made them eager and competitive fighters:  strength, aggression, courage and, in particular, a powerful instinct to hang on like grim death once the animal has sunk a bite.

Dogfighting was a popular sport, and people made money on it.  It was inevitable that they would breed dogs who were, on average, quite likely to inflict dangerous injuries when provoked.  This would be more pronounced if the dogs were taught to fight rather than being trained and socialized as companion animals, but it’s also in the genes of that type of dog.

Not every modern pit bull necessarily shows all those traits, but it is kind of ridiculous to pretend that a deliberately selected gene pool doesn’t have implications.

posted by: robn on July 12, 2014  11:03pm

GP and ALL,

Strength is bred. Inclination is taught. Breeds don’t cause harm; irresponsible owners cause harm. Both the White House and the CDC agree with me; this is based upon data and not conjecture.

posted by: Threefifths on July 13, 2014  9:14am

posted by: robn on July 12, 2014 11:03pm

GP and ALL,

Strength is bred. Inclination is taught. Breeds don’t cause harm; irresponsible owners cause harm. Both the White House and the CDC agree with me; this is based upon data and not conjecture.


Some breeds are naturally aggressive due to genetics. My point is.If you have these types of dogs,You should have a one hundred thousand dollar ins bond to pay medical bills if you dog bite someone.


In the 9-year period from 2005 to 2013, pit bulls killed 176 Americans and accounted for 62% of the total recorded deaths (283). Combined, pit bulls and rottweilers accounted for 74% of these deaths.

http://www.dogsbite.org/dog-bite-statistics-fatalities-2013.php

posted by: Pantagruel on July 13, 2014  2:55pm

One problem with the data is that all bites are counted as the same. A tea cup poodle bite=a pit bull bite. In terms of level of injury per bite, there is no comparison.

I walk my dog through East Rock park everyday, and although the pit bull incident doesn’t apply as willfully off leash, I am appalled at the disregard of the Dogs Must Be Leashed sign at the park entrance. East Rock Park is not a dog park. It is not cute to see your dog playing frisbee or simply running around loose. As a dog walker, my pooch and I are particular targets of unrestrained dogs, and I often get mocked at and laughed at by indignant dog owners when I point out the illegality of their actions—people who probably consider themselves upstanding citizens.

The city is short of cash, and it could do worse than picking up some change by citing the many scofflaws who unleash their dogs daily.

(OT: The city could pick up even more money by concealing a patrol car near the park entrance corner of Cold Spring and Livingston, where as a pedestrian you are taking your life into your hands since many drivers consider the stop signs as suggestions. One of these days I’m going to sit at that corner with my phone and video all the drivers who go through that intersection as if there were no stop signs—but my dog would get inpatient just sitting there—although it wouldn’t take more than a couple of minutes to video several lawbreakers.)

posted by: robn on July 14, 2014  9:02am

PG,

You’re right about the need to collect more detailed data, but The CDC study concludes that
a) Fatal bites are 0.00001% of all dog bites annually.
b) Stats for bites by breed change over time, showing that irresponsible owners will skirt breed restrictions (worth noting that in this day and age, abuse and abandonment of pit bulls is a cultural offshoot of illegal activity such as dog fighting and drug running. Ban pit bulls and they’ll switch to something else.)
c) From the study, “Several interacting factors affect a dog’s propensity to bite, including heredity, sex, early experience, socialization and training, health (medical and behavioral), reproductive status, quality of ownership and supervision, and victim behavior.” The most consistent predictors of potential danger are chained male dogs that are intact and in an abusive or uncontrolled environment.

http://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/images/dogbreeds-a.pdf

posted by: SteveOnAnderson on July 14, 2014  10:01am

While I appreciate the reporting, I strongly agree with other commenters that the headline should read “Dog Attacks Cop.” We all play a role in fighting against the very real breed bias against pit bulls, and drawing attention to the breed in the headline is an irresponsible choice by the New Haven Independent that perpetuates these biases and plays on fear-mongering. I hope the NHI changes the title and is more thoughtful about the implications of this issue in the future.

If the NHI wants to go farther in taking on the issue of breed bias, there are hundreds (if not thousands) of rescued pit bulls in the New Haven area that have found loving homes and are living happy lives. The efforts that thousands of residents are making to rescue this horribly abused breed are absolutely deserving of coverage, as is the incredible love, affection, and loyalty of pit bulls for their new families.

This is an issue I’m in strong agreement with robn on! Put it in the record books ;)

posted by: Gretchen Pritchard on July 14, 2014  10:06am

Pantagruel, you’re right on the money about the irresponsible owners who let their dogs off leash and then blame the victim when their dogs wreak havoc. Some years ago my husband was walking our passive little rescue beagle at Bowen Field, and encountered a man with an aggressive yellow lab, off leash.  As the man started to “warn” my husband that his dog was “not very friendly,” the dog rushed at our beagle and savaged her.  The reaction of the aggressive dog’s owner was that we had failed to protect our dog despite his warning.  He did not offer to give his name or phone number, and since our stoic little beagle was not heavily bleeding, my husband simply took her home.  Only later in the day did we realize the extent of the injuries, which required stitches and hospitalization.  We did track the man down via our neighborhood email list, and when we showed photographs of the wounds, he paid the vet bill, which was over $800.  Of course his payment did not undo our dog’s actual suffering or compensate us for the distress or the imposition on our time and plans resulting from this entirely unnecessary and avoidable injury to our animal.  And I’m sure he regards himself as a responsible citizen, but ... no.

posted by: SteveOnAnderson on July 14, 2014  10:27am

@ Gretchen Pritchard:

You are giving a poor breeding history of pit bulls. I can’t tell if it is simply mistaken or deliberately disingenuous, but that kind of fear-mongering helps no one. Here are some quick facts on pit bulls:

- Beginning in the late-1800s, pit bulls were known as “nanny dogs” because of their loyalty and affection for humans. They were often left with children to care for them and guard them, since it was safe to leave them with children, they have the pain threshold to deal with pokes and pulls, and they have the intelligence to help keep children out of trouble. Check out this gallery:
http://www.thepetcollective.tv/did-you-know-that-pit-bulls-were-known-as-the-nanny-dog/

Personal note: Our pit bull plays with our 8 year-old son all the time! And also wrestles with our greyhounds, who pin him down.

- The most celebrated war dog in American history, Sergeant Stubby, was a pit bull mix with a deep connection to New Haven. Stubby was found on a New Haven field near the Yale Bowl in 1917, and went on to become a national figure as the most decorated dog in WWI and the only dog to ever earn the rank of Sergeant. You can see Stubby now at the Smithsonian:
http://articles.courant.com/2014-05-27/news/hc-250-veteran-sgt-stubby-20140526_1_stubby-new-haven-famous-dog

- There are many informative, accurate articles out there about pit bulls’ breeding history, which makes it all the more confusing as to why people would spread speculation and misinformation. Here is a good, short article on pit bull breeding:
http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/truth-about-pit-bulls

- As much as I support rescue (and will continue to rescue pit bulls), the problem will not be resolved until the deep, structural socio-economic roots of the problem are faced. Unemployment, mass incarceration, segregation, and poverty drive dog fighting. It is the abuse inflicted by humans on pit bulls through dog fighting that creates aggressive behavior

posted by: robn on July 14, 2014  1:42pm

Every year in the US, @4.7M people are bitten by a dog and every year there are @11M automobile accidents. Between 1979 and 1998 there were 482 dog bite fatalities. In the same time period there were 884,866 automobile accident fatalities. So which car models should we ban?

posted by: 1644 on July 14, 2014  3:26pm

3/5’s:  Apartment owners can get liability insurance.  It comes with renter’s insurance, and is a good idea for anyone renting. 
Ndog: How is an insurance requirement punishment?  Surely you realize that any dog can cause damage.  Shouldn’t the owner be able to compensate an injured party for the damage his dog might inflict? 
We require insurance for cars.  In our society, even in a city like New Haven, not having a car is a bigger handicap than not having a dog (service dogs excepted).  As a society, we say if one cannot afford insurance, one cannot have a car.  Likewise, we can say if one cannot afford insurance, one cannot have a dog.  I love dogs, but I have a small yard in a crowded neighborhood, so I do not have one.  As for the dogs in the shelter, they may be put down humanely.  I have done it with my pets as they ended their lives.

posted by: SteveOnAnderson on July 15, 2014  8:47am

Phenomenal article in the August 2014 issue of Esquire:

“This is a story about an American dog: my dog, Dexter. And because Dexter is a pit bull, this is also a story about the American dog, because pit bulls have changed the way Americans think about dogs in general. Reviled, pit bulls have become representative. There is no other dog that figures as often in the national narrative—no other dog as vilified on the evening news, no other dog as defended on television programs, no other dog as mythologized by both its enemies and its advocates, no other dog as discriminated against, no other dog as wantonly bred, no other dog as frequently abused, no other dog as promiscuously abandoned, no other dog as likely to end up in an animal shelter, no other dog as likely to be rescued, no other dog as likely to be killed. In a way, the pit bull has become the only American dog, because it is the only American dog that has become an American metaphor—and the only American dog that people bother to name. When a cocker spaniel bites, it does so as a member of its species; it is never anything but a dog. When a pit bull bites, it does so as a member of its breed. A pit bull is never anything but a pit bull.”

“We kill anywhere from 2,000 to 3,000 pit bulls a day. They are rising simultaneously in popularity and disposability, becoming something truly American, a popular dog forever poised on the brink of extermination.”

posted by: Ndog on July 16, 2014  1:17pm

YES! Please go to http://www.esquire.com and read the article “The State of The American Dog”.

posted by: robn on July 17, 2014  11:52am

A shamelessly adorable anecdote about Pit Bull heroism…heck why not.

Pit bull saves deaf boy from fire on Southeastside…

http://www.indystar.com/story/news/2014/07/16/dog-saves-deaf-boy-fire-southeastside/12745697/

posted by: 1644 on July 17, 2014  3:11pm

SOA’s links label Pitbull’s as uniquely dangerous.  From the ASPCA:
” Pit bulls have been bred to behave differently during a fight. They may not give warning before becoming aggressive, and they’re less likely to back down when clashing with an opponent. When provoked, they may become aggressive more readily than another breed might. Sometimes they don’t inhibit their bites, so they may cause injury more often than other dogs.”
In contrast, (and in my experience) the ASPCA says most dog fights are ritualized contests for dominance in which little harm is done.  The purpose is to establish one’s place in the pack, not kill other members of the pack on whom one depends. 
  The dog in the Esquire article displays the dangerous behavior described by the ASCPA: when attacked by another dog, he quickly gets the better of his challenger, but still refuses to release and holds his opponent in a death grip. 
Likewise, the comment about nanny dogs say” who would kidnap your baby with this guy guarding him” indicates the dog is aggressive with strangers. “Protective” just means agggressive to strangers.  When I was very young, my family adopted a stray mix,  pit bull type dog.  He allowed me to poke him and put my hands in his mouth without complaint.  But when a stranger came to the house, he went into attack mode, breaking chains and crashing through windows to attack.  My parents put him down.

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