Trains Get 190 Bike Racks

The state’s transportation department has a double suggestion for how to avoid driving to work: ride your bike to the train, then bring your wheels on board.

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy and transportation chief James Redeker offered that suggestion at a press conference Thursday at Union Station.

They announced that the state has installed 190 new bike racks on Metro-North trains.

“Every train will have a bike rack” now, the governor said.

He recommended not bringing your bike to busy platforms and onto crowded trains during rush hour. Otherwise, he noted, “much of the day and evening is not during that [peak] time,” so he welcomed the dual-mode commuting.

“We are listening to our customers” who asked for more racks, he said.

Officials also unveiled at the press conference a new smartphone app called MTA eTix through which riders can purchase tickets, present them to conductors, and gain real-time information about trains.

Malloy offered a third good-news announcement as well: The New Haven line saw a record 40.3 million passenger trips in 2015, even though gas prices had dropped in that time. People, it seems, want to ride to work if they can.

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posted by: HewNaven on August 18, 2016  2:22pm

Redeker drives a car?! I never would have guessed that.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 18, 2016  3:22pm

Wake up car-owners,We are under attack.Again Why don’t we all just turn in our car keys to the vampire bicycle lobby?  That way you will give up your car and ride a bike.I bet slick Dan Malloy who Black and Latino Judas Goat leader told you all to vote for and now slick Dan Malloy wants to raising the bus fare from $1.50 to $1.75. He also seeks to increase the amount that Metro-North’s Connecticut commuters and Shore Line East riders pay by about 5 percent.I bet this will pay for those good old Bike Racks.

posted by: robn on August 18, 2016  8:13pm

3/5,

Since drivers are given an annual subsidy of $1,100 per year, you can just break out your checkbook and write a refund check to all of those cyclists and pedestrians out there who inflict zero damage on roads. When you’ve done that we’ll call it even.

posted by: robn on August 18, 2016  8:14pm

http://www.uspirg.org/sites/pirg/files/reports/Who Pays for Roads vUS.pdf

posted by: William Kurtz on August 18, 2016  8:31pm

Please. So each train—not every train car—is going to have space for a few bicycles, but not during peak hours and the governor would like a pat on the back? This isn’t a ‘suggestion’ from Governor Malloy and Mr. Rederker; it’s something area cycling advocates have been asking for more than ten years.

And a smart phone app to buy tickets? We’re basically at 2005 levels of service now.

posted by: William Kurtz on August 18, 2016  8:35pm

Oh, and THREEFIFTHS is right: this sham ‘progress’ is a smokescreen for the other nonsense Malloy is pulling: raising bus and train fares and refusing to entertain any suggestions for the proposed Union Station parking garage.

So much for the governor who was going to the one who understood Connecticut’s cities.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 19, 2016  2:20am

posted by: robn on August 18, 2016 9:13pm

3/5,

Since drivers are given an annual subsidy of $1,100 per year, you can just break out your checkbook and write a refund check to all of those cyclists and pedestrians out there who inflict zero damage on roads. When you’ve done that we’ll call it even.

The roads benefit every one In Connecticut, bicycles fall within the definition of a motor vehicle How come they do not paid for insurance to be on the road. Made to get a cycling license and bicycle registration and pay taxes on there bicycles like we do on cars.

posted by: HewNaven on August 19, 2016  8:07am

bicycles fall within the definition of a motor vehicle

Alright, 3/5. We’ve all sat here and listened for years, politely. But, I cannot stand to have someone denigrate the greatest invention on EARTH by calling it a “motor vehicle”. Never! Show me the motor!

posted by: William Kurtz on August 19, 2016  8:57am

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 19, 2016 3:20am

The roads benefit every one In Connecticut, bicycles fall within the definition of a motor vehicle How come they do not paid for insurance to be on the road. Made to get a cycling license and bicycle registration and pay taxes on there bicycles like we do on cars.

I respectfully submit that you are trying to have it all ways: continually arguing against even the most basic and fundamental improvements to the streets to benefit people on foot and on bikes (which you perceive as coming at the expense of motorists) and here claiming that “the roads benefit everyone in Connecticut” when anyone who ever gets around at any time without using a personal automobile can tell you that’s not the case. It’s definitely getting better, especially in progressive urban centers like New Haven, but we’re a long way from any kind of parity in allocating transportation resources.

The reason there’s no insurance requirement on bicycles is that they don’t carry anywhere near the risk of causing serious property damage, catastrophic injury, or death that automobiles do.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 19, 2016  1:21pm

posted by: William Kurtz on August 19, 2016 9:57am

The reason there’s no insurance requirement on bicycles is that they don’t carry anywhere near the risk of causing serious property damage, catastrophic injury, or death that automobiles do

Not true.

Woman Hit by a Bicyclist in Central Park Dies.

Ms. Tarlov, who lived in Fairfield, Conn., had been in New York City shopping for a present for her daughter, according to her family.

She was walking through the park around 4:30 p.m. when she stepped into the roadway.

At the same time, Mr. Marshall was coming down the street on his racing bike, the police said.

Mr. Marshall swerved to avoid a group of pedestrians, the police said, but struck Ms. Tarlov. She was rushed to the hospital and was placed on a ventilator.

Mr. Marshall, a professional baritone saxophone player who lives in Harlem, remained at the scene. He has not been charged with any crime.

Pedestrian hit by a cyclist died from massive blood clot six days after doctors failed to spot a badly injured artery in his neck

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2719122/Pedestrian-hit-cyclist-died-massive-blood-clot-six-days-doctors-failed-spot-badly-injured-artery-neck.html

STUDY: BIKES HIT MORE PEDESTRIANS THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT

Earlier research, based on a sample of hospitals nationwide, estimated that there were approximately 1,000 pedestrians hit by a cyclist each year in the United States who needed to obtain medical treatment at a hospital. This present study, based on every hospital in New York State, has found that in New York State alone, there were approximately 1000 pedestrians struck by cyclists each year necessitating medical treatment at a hospital.

And by the why last year a cyclist run a stop sign and hit the fender of my car. I had to pay out of my pocket six hundred dollars to get it fix. Also in other countries cyclists do have insurance.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 19, 2016  1:24pm

posted by: HewNaven on August 19, 2016 9:07am


Bicycles fall within the definition of a motor vehicle

Alright, 3/5. We’ve all sat here and listened for years, politely. But, I cannot stand to have someone denigrate the greatest invention on EARTH by calling it a “motor vehicle”. Never! Show me the motor!

Read Conn. Motor Vehicle law. As I said Bicycles fall within the definition of a motor vehicle.

posted by: William Kurtz on August 19, 2016  2:49pm

THREEFIFTHS,

You mention the Jill Tarlov case every time this conversation comes up. It was reckless and irresponsible of Mr. Marshall; I don’t disagree. But it’s still, statistically speaking, an anomaly.

From the reporting on the same study you mentioned (emphasis mine):

While this Hunter study definitely shows that pedestrian-cyclist accidents are more common than previously believed, it is important to remember that it comes with no further information about the actual accidents—which is pretty crucial info. By the nature of the data set it is derived from, we do not know how any of these occurred, who was at fault, or the seriousness of the accident. And while, as a rep for Transportation Alternatives puts it, “no death or serious injury is acceptable on our streets, there is strong evidence that bike behavior is improving as bicycling is becoming more mainstream. According to the study, bike on pedestrian injuries declined 15% from 2007 to 2010. During this same four year period, cycling in New York City increased over 50 percent.”

There’s no way of knowing, for example, how many of these injuries were caused by the ‘jaywalkers’ you frequently seem upset about. A clear hierarchy is emerging: people in cars at the top, and the little people, on bikes and on foot, at the bottom. Consider what the streets would look like if every single person traveling around New Haven on foot or on a bike instead chose to get around by single-occupancy car . . .

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 19, 2016  5:11pm

posted by: William Kurtz on August 19, 2016 3:49pm

THREEFIFTHS,

You mention the Jill Tarlov case every time this conversation comes up. It was reckless and irresponsible of Mr. Marshall; I don’t disagree. But it’s still, statistically speaking, an anomaly.

Do you know the family from what I read tried to sue him and he has no money. As I said last year a cyclist run a stop sign and hit the fender of my car. I had to pay out of my pocket six hundred dollars to get it fix. Just like cars have accidents, So do cyclist. Now if both of them had insurance no problem.

posted by: robn on August 20, 2016  9:04pm

3/5,

Sorry but calling major super, defcon 1 BS on your repeated false insinuation that bicyclist cause many fatalities. There are many government agencies that track this data (USDOT, NHTSA, CDC, etc) and within any metric (total numbers, per capita, miles travelled, etc) it’s clear that fatalities from motor vehicle accidents far outstrip any other form of transportation. So just stop it.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 21, 2016  8:34am

posted by: robn on August 20, 2016 10:04pm

3/5,

Sorry but calling major super, defcon 1 BS on your repeated false insinuation that bicyclist cause many fatalities. There are many government agencies that track this data (USDOT, NHTSA, CDC, etc) and within any metric (total numbers, per capita, miles travelled, etc) it’s clear that fatalities from motor vehicle accidents far outstrip any other form of transportation. So just stop it.

Show me the data from (USDOT, NHTSA, CDC,There is no question motor vehicle accidents far outstrip any other form of transportation. Are you saying that pedestrians are not hit by a cyclist.Which is my point.

posted by: robn on August 21, 2016  12:30pm

3/5,

Do your own research.

And no, your point isn’t to say that one person was struck by cyclists. Your point is to exaggerate its significance by bringing it up as frequently as possible in the context of conversations regarding vehicular danger. Just stop it.