Yale Unions Endorse Lamont, Wooden

Thomas BreenLess than a week before statewide Democratic primaries, two candidates earned New Haven’s most important on-the-ground endorsement: from Yale’s UNITE HERE unions

As the humidity finally broke and rain began to fall on Wednesday night, UNITE HERE Local 35 President Bob Proto, who heads Yale University’s blue-collar union, announced the endorsement of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont and Democratic state treasurer candidate Shawn Wooden. The two party-endorsed candidates face challengers in next Tuesday’s primaries.

“We’re gonna need help,” Proto said about ensuring that all New Haveners have access to stable, full-time employment. “And where we’re gonna be able to turn for help is to folks who share the same vision as us.” Those folks, he said, are Lamont and Wooden.

The endorsements came at the end of a march for jobs organized by the local UNITE HERE unions and by the affiliated labor advocacy group New Haven Rising. The march, which Lamont and Wooden walked in alongside Democratic attorney general candidate Chris Mattei and over 100 New Haveners, started in Goffe Street Park, wound its way through surrounding streets and culminated with a brief rally in Scantlebury Park on Ashmun Street. (UNITE HERE has not made an endorsement for the attorney general primary.)

UNITE HERE Local 35 and Local 34, the latter being Yale’s clerical and technical workers union, have been the most influential political force in town for the better part of a decade, since they first succeeded in getting a majority of union-backed candidates elected to the Board of Alders in 2011. Wednesday’s endorsement covers those locals as well as Local 33, which represents graduate student teachers, as well as UNITE HERE’s New England Joint Board.

The union has long held a reputation for running the best door-knocking and get-out-the-vote campaigns in town, helping to elect statewide candidates like Gov. Dannel P. Malloy and U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy as well as neighborhood-level party ward committee co-chairs.

Lamont, a Greenwich businessman, and Wooden, a former Hartford City Council president, are the first two candidates for Connecticut statewide office to be endorsed by UNITE HERE before the Democratic and Republican primaries next Tuesday. Both candidates won the endorsement of the state Democratic Party during its convention in Hartford in May.

Proto said the union will not be endorsing candidates in attorney general and lieutenant governor races until after the primaries are complete.

Most of Wednesday night’s rally in Scantlebury Park focused on the local unions’ 2015 pact with Yale that earned the university’s commitment to hire 1,000 New Haveners from primarily low-income neighborhoods to full-time jobs by 2018.

Local 34 President Laurie Kennington, Local 33 Vice President Robin Dawson (from the university’s graduate teachers union), and New Haven Rising’s Scott Marks each spoke to the importance of Yale following through on that jobs commitment.

“We are here because it is time to finally enjoy the prosperity and renaissance that our city is experiencing,” Kennington said, “and to make sure that all of us in this city can prosper too.”

Proto said that the unions are currently in the process of verifying that Yale has followed through on its commitment to hire 1,000 New Haveners by 2018.

“This community should be the ones first in line for Yale University jobs, for Yale-New Haven Hospital jobs,” he said about Newhallville and Dixwell, “because of the exodus of manufacturing in this town. This community should be put first. And that is gonna be our plan.”

He called on residents to help the unions continue to pressure the university and other major employers in town to hire locally, even after Yale completes its 1,000 jobs commitment.

“I don’t care about this rain,” Lamont said as he took the microphone alongside Wooden and Varick AME Pastor Kelcy Steele, “because this crowd is on fire. And we’re going to be standing up for our rights. Get up. Stand up. Stand up for your rights!”

Lamont praised Marks for leading the jobs walk along Henry Street and Winchester Avenue. He said the walk was about safe streets, community pride, and economic opportunity.

“We walked by some of those factories,” he said, referencing the old Winchester Repeating Arms plant and other industrial sites that once employed tens of thousands of people in the Dixwell and Newhallville neighborhoods. “They’re now empty. Those are going to be filled. We’re going to bring back that opportunity.” (Some of the buildings have been reborn as Science Park tech centers and new apartments.)

Wooden, who grew up in Hartford, said walking through Dixwell and Newhallville reminded him of walking through the neighborhoods of his childhood.

“I applaud this community for coming together,” he said. “I applaud UNITE.”

Click on the Facebook Live video below to watch the full rally and endorsement.

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posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 8, 2018  10:26pm

Lamont (left) channeling Bob Marley: Get up. Stand up. Stand up for your rights!

They should have play this one By his son Stephen Marley - Chase dem

Ey, and they say it’s part of it
So they buying you, sell your soul
Well, my friend, the thought of it
They’ll sell your soul for a piece of gold

While they in their companion slaves
Slaving through the night
I know I can find my way for there is light

Chase dem
Run them politicians
When I see dem I get cold

And they’ll say it’s a part of it
So they buying you, sell your soul
Well, my friend, the thought of it
They’ll sell your soul for a piece of gold

While they in their companion slaves
Slaving through the night
Now I’ll pave my way and I’ll pave it right

Chase dem
Run them politicians
When I see dem I get cold

They’ll still say it’s a part of it
So they buying you, sell your soul
Well my friend, the thought of it
They’ll sell your soul for a piece of gold

And they in their companion slaves
Slaving through the night
I know I can find my way for out there is light

Chase dem
Run them politicians
When I see dem I get cold

Chase
Run, run, run
Ay, ay, ay, ay

Get them out, get them out
Run them away
(Chase)

https://youtu.be/symmEkjFn38

People wake up.Ned Lamont will be just like Ex Mayor Michael Bloomberg of New York.Both are cut from the same cloth.Ned Lamont will destroy the unions Lay you state workers off and Bring in the Charter Schools.

Part One.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 8, 2018  10:51pm

Part Two.

“I don’t care about this rain,” Lamont said as he took the microphone alongside Wooden and Varick AME Pastor Kelcy Steele, “because this crowd is on fire. And we’re going to be standing up for our rights. Get up. Stand up. Stand up for your rights!”

Just as Esau in his day sold his birthright for a mess of pottage.Black Minsters have sold out to the white political machine.Many of today’s Black Minsters are no longer leading the charge for equality and justice. They are more concerned with getting access to political and economic power through opportunistic endorsements.


You give white politicians all of your support, and get nothing in return. You put the Democrats first, and they put you last——-MALCOLM X (from his speech called, the Ballot or the Bullet)


The white liberals control the Negro and the Negro vote by controlling the Negro civil rights leaders. As long as they control the Negro civil rights leaders, they can also control and contain the Negro’s struggle, and they can control the Negro’s so-called revolt.
Malcom X

Both political parties have betrayed the cause of justice. The Democrats have betrayed it by capitulating to the prejudice, and undemocratic practices of the Southern Dixiecrats . The Republicans have betrayed it by capitulating to the blatant hypocrisy of the right wing reactionary Northerners——-DR. KING

posted by: quercifolia on August 9, 2018  12:26am

“UNITE HERE Local 35 and Local 34, the latter being Yale’s clerical and technical workers union, have been the most influential political force in town for the better part of a decade, since they first succeeded in getting a majority of union-backed candidates elected to the Board of Alders in 2011.”

It’s as if you can say, with pinpoint accuracy, the exact tipping point when things went wrong. Yea, thanks Breen for reminding us of the union alder thugs we have “elected” into office. Mostly because voters don’t know or care to pick otherwise or were bombarded by a “name” due to the 13k union funding per ward. Clearly, this hasn’t worked out well for the city since 2011. Clearly, majority of alders don’t have citizens interests in mind. Clearly, we are heading towards bankruptcy which would ironically be ideal if that forces us into MARB control of financial decisions. The enemy of my enemy is my friend. Whatever, so long as we don’t continue business as usual.

posted by: robn on August 9, 2018  12:40am

Suburban union boss Proto, Laurie Kennington, UNITE, and Locals 34 35 are why New Haven is near bankruptcy. Unless you’re an idiot, you’ll vote against any candidate they endorse.

posted by: NHPLEB on August 9, 2018  6:55am

“The white liberals control the Negro and the Negro vote by controlling the Negro civil rights leaders. As long as they control the Negro civil rights leaders, they can also control and contain the Negro’s struggle, and they can control the Negro’s so-called revolt. “
Malcom X

Substitute “workers”, “gays”, “immigrants”-  We can apply this to any group but the statement is very true. We are controlled. But we are controlled because we allow it. If we stand up;  our “leaders” will pee their pants.

BTW—-  seeing these party hacks and flunkies around Lamont is all the reason I need not to vote for him.

posted by: observer1 on August 9, 2018  9:32am

Lamont walked by factories that can never be opened providing jobs, and apartments nobody living in the neighborhood can afford to live in. He lied and will continue to sell lies to get elected.

posted by: LookOut on August 9, 2018  9:41am

this made it easy for me (and most thinking voters in New Haven.  Anyone that the unions support by definition will be against the people and businesses of our city.  I will vote for ANYONE who is running against a union supported candidate.

posted by: 1644 on August 9, 2018  10:15am

I recall many strikes by Winchester union workers.  It’s possible that Winchester would be gone by now regardless of the labor force, but the unions certainly hastened its departure.  Winchester rifles are now made in Japan.

.”...a prolonged and bitter strike in 1979–1980 ultimately convinced Olin that firearms could no longer be produced profitably in New Haven.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester_Repeating_Arms_Company

posted by: 1644 on August 9, 2018  10:29am

NHPLEB:  Black leaders like Kimber are happy to openly sell their political support for cash.  Elicker has mentioned that several community leaders offered their political support in return for cash.  He might be mayor if he had said yes, although the reason he would be a good mayor is that he said no.  I doubt Elicker would be taking trips to China and having police officers drive him about while teachers were being laid-off. When was the last mayor to have police drivers?  Lee?

posted by: Callisto on August 9, 2018  11:10am

“Anyone that the unions support by definition will be against the people and businesses of our city. “ I love false dichotomies! I get how you feel aggrieved by unions and their supporters - do you get how some people think otherwise? When you say you’ll vote for ANYONE (your emphasis) against unions I’m pretty sure you don’t mean for more socialistic policy - which means vote to the right. And there’s the problem - the only function of the right today is to fire up their base with divisive emotional invective while raiding the public till with a trillion and a half dollar tax cut for the wealthy (that’s 1000 billion ....). Despite their many inefficiencies and mismanagement, unions still translate to better wages and benefits for middle class working people. I’m done voting for the 1% to get even richer while we fight over scraps below. And, honestly, my belief that the Dems are the “lesser of two evils” I’m less sure of these days for exactly the same reasons.

posted by: robn on August 9, 2018  11:30am

CALLISTO,

Your positive comments about unions simply aren’t true for the majority of working class people in NHV and the rest of the country. The benefits granted to the 7% of the population in private and in public sector unions come at a cost to all others.

posted by: Callisto on August 9, 2018  12:08pm

Much less of a cost than the .1% who own Congress, the Supreme Court and POTUS.

posted by: robn on August 9, 2018  12:12pm

CALLISTO,

Tell that to the NHV residents who just got slapped with an 11% property tax/rent increase and who got saddled with $84,000,000 of long term interest because of excessive spending by the union controlled BOA and Mayor.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 9, 2018  1:52pm

posted by: robn on August 9, 2018 12:12pm
CALLISTO,

Tell that to the NHV residents who just got slapped with an 11% property tax/rent increase and who got saddled with $84,000,000 of long term interest because of excessive spending by the union controlled BOA and Mayor.


Should not the Blame be put on the voters who keep voting them in?


posted by: 1644 on August 9, 2018 10:15am
I recall many strikes by Winchester union workers.  It’s possible that Winchester would be gone by now regardless of the labor force, but the unions certainly hastened its departure. Winchester rifles are now made in Japan


Not according to this it was not the unions

When and why did production of Winchester’s historic designs move to Japan?

In the late 1980s Winchester Repeating Arms—then often referred to as U.S. Repeating Arms or Winchester Rifles and Shotguns—was sold to new owners and become part of a greater group of brands under the Herstal Group umbrella. The Herstal Group and it’s legendary FN factories soon became an option for the future production of Winchester firearms.With changing world conditions for manufacturers, this would prove to be a very fortuitous development. A series of over and under shotguns followed, known today as the Winchester 101 (named after the original and well-like 101 of the 1960s). An often overlooked bit of history is that the original 101 was iimported from a factory in Japan in the 1960s and ‘70s before Winchester Repeating Arms was part of the
Herstal Group. The Herstal Group (FN) and Miroku in Japan. Since the 1960s, Herstal Group companies had a close association with the Miroku firearms company in Kochi, Japan. They produced and continue to produce some of the most popular and highly regarded over and unders and bolt actions in the hunting and shooting industry for the group—both in the U.S. and in Europe.

Read the rest.

http://www.winchesterguns.com/support/faq/when-why-did-production-winchesters-historic-designs-move.html

posted by: 1644 on August 9, 2018  2:36pm

3/5’s: Nothing in your link contradicts my post, the Wikipedia link, or my memory.  The plain fact is that New Haven’s union workers were not competitive with Japanese workers.  You will note that after Olin left New Haven, the workers assumed control of the company, presumably under an ESOP.  Like Animal Farm, workers controlled the company for years.  Like most ESOPs (think United Airlines), the workers failed to generate enough capital to reinvest and weather sales downturns.  So, the company went bankrupt, the Belgian firm picked up the pieces.  Gant had a similar story: a Swiss man bought the brandname, moved design to Stockholm and production to East Asia and Portugal.  (You may not have lived this history as I did, so flip through some New Haven Register archives to follow the story.)

posted by: 1644 on August 9, 2018  2:55pm

Observer: Can you imagine the response if someone tried to restart a gun factory at the Winchester site? Especially if it meant rebuilding the Farmington Canal line railroad?  New Haven would be apocalyptic.

posted by: Noteworthy on August 9, 2018  4:29pm

Prostituting the Vote Notes:

1. This is emblematic of the whoring that happens between politicians seeking higher office and unions that control blocks of votes.

2. Vote for anybody but Lamont.

3. The headline should be changed: Whore Convention Comes to New Haven.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 9, 2018  5:19pm

posted by: 1644 on August 9, 2018 2:36pm
3/5’s: Nothing in your link contradicts my post, the Wikipedia link, or my memory.  The plain fact is that New Haven’s union workers were not competitive with Japanese workers.

Your post does not say union workers were not competitive with Japanese workers.I did see in you post that it said By the 1960s, the rising cost of skilled labor was making it increasingly unprofitable to produce Winchester’s classic designs, as they required considerable hand-work to finish. In particular, Winchester’s flagship Model 12 pump shotgun and Model 70 bolt-action rifle with their machined forgings could no longer compete in price with Remington’s cast-and-stamped 870 and 700. The result was a new line of guns which replaced most of the older products in 1963–1964. The immediate reaction of the shooting press and public was overwhelmingly negative: the popular verdict was that Winchester had sacrificed quality to the “cheapness experts,”[6] and Winchester was no longer considered to be a prestige brand, causing a marked loss of market share. To this day, gun collectors consider “post-64” Winchesters to be both less desirable and less valuable than their predecessors.

It did say Labor costs continued to rise through the 1960s and ‘70s, and a prolonged and bitter strike in 1979–1980 ultimately convinced Olin that firearms could no longer be produced profitably in New Haven

Labor cost is the amount of employee wages and benefits.But those employees are also Upper management and the CEO Wages.You forgot the New Haven plant was sold to its employees,I just ask my Next door neighbour who work there when New Haven plant was sold to its employees.He told Me Upper management and the CEO got a big Golden parachutes.

posted by: Christopher Schaefer on August 9, 2018  9:07pm

“The endorsements came at the end of a march for jobs”.
Don’t miss the irony here: CT State govt has been controlled by Democrats for nearly 4 decades—and our state had the 8th lowest job growth in the USA last year and one of the highest unemployment rates.
Definition of insanity: allowing the same Party to continue its decades-long governance—and expecting different results.
“The union has long held a reputation for…helping to elect statewide candidates like Gov. Dannel P. Malloy”.
Need I say more?
“Wooden, a former Hartford City Council president”.
Yes, that’s the same city that was about to declare bankruptcy but was bailed out by the State—i.e. by us taxpayers.
Kennington: “We are here because it is time to finally enjoy the prosperity and renaissance that our city is experiencing”.
Does that include the 11% tax increase? And the impending, massive city deficits that inevitably will result in even more killer tax increases? And ultimately force New Haven into state MARB control?

posted by: observer1 on August 9, 2018  10:03pm

FN owned the Browning and FN brand, but leased the right to make Winchester firearms from Olin Corporation which owns the Winchester trademark. In 1981 Olin gave a group of Winchester executives permission to lease the name and buy the old factory. They mismanaged the business and were forced into bankruptcy. One of them was hit with federal fraud charges for draining assets and went to prison for a time. Giat, a French government-owned weapons manufacturer, based in Roanne, France came in and bought the property and leased the rights to make Winchester firearms from Olin Corp. They built the new factory at Winchester Ave and Division St., which was sold to FN, who owns factories in Liege Belgium, Columbia SC, and Viana Portugal. When the Winchester factory in New Haven was closed, the plan was to produce the Model 70 rifle in SC, the 1300 shotgun in Portugal and the model 94 lever action rifle at Miroku (Japan). Except for the Model 70, the plans failed for a variety of reasons. The Model 70 is now manufactured in Portugal and assembled in Columbia, SC. Miroku makes a few high end Model 94 type rifles. Browning did not want Winchester to compete with their brand, and was instrumental in closing the New Haven factory. The IAM union workers were not the prime reason for the plant closing, but lack of productivity gave Browning a reason to push their agenda. There was plenty of blame for the factory closing that can be shared by New Haven management, the union and corporate management. Keep in mind that Winchester, Remington, Marlin, and Mossberg ( except for a small presence in North Haven) have all left Connecticut.

posted by: JCFremont on August 10, 2018  8:56am

Pretty ironic we are arguing about the glory days of New Haven’s era manufacturing firearms. Hasn’t New Haven and the rest of the state chased out the entire industry? Their endorsed candidate for Treasurer TV ad states he will take out all state investments in gun manufacturers. There is a big difference between public and private sector unions and it is the public unions that get people in an uproar. Go over and ask WTNH union leaders and get a real idea about what unions in changing industries face. How about the pressmen unions in the newspaper industry. I’m sure Yale plays soft and with it’s major unions for public relations reasons and well they are pretty much know they can’t relocate.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 10, 2018  11:41am

posted by: 1644 on August 9, 2018 2:36pm

3/5’s: Nothing in your link contradicts my post, the Wikipedia link, or my memory.

Looks like observer1 did.

posted by: observer1 on August 9, 2018 10:03pm

FN owned the Browning and FN brand, but leased the right to make Winchester firearms from Olin Corporation which owns the Winchester trademark. In 1981 Olin gave a group of Winchester executives permission to lease the name and buy the old factory. They mismanaged the business and were forced into bankruptcy. One of them was hit with federal fraud charges for draining assets and went to prison for a time.

In fact that is what my Next door neighbour said to me when he told Me Upper management and the CEO got a big Golden parachutes.

posted by: BevHills730 on August 10, 2018  12:19pm

Unfortunately, 1644 never lets facts or history disrupt his far-right and anti-labor views.

posted by: 1644 on August 10, 2018  2:28pm

3/5’s I didn’t contest observer1, who seems to have a better knowledge of the history than any of us.  As he said, plenty of blame, including the union.  How much gets apportioned to each is debatable.

Bev:  Do you have anything to add to the conversation, or just another personal attack?

posted by: Itcantbereal on August 10, 2018  5:13pm

Does Scott Marks do anything of substance for the Center for a New Economy other than lead protests/rallies???  I’m told he’s paid to lead protests and other actions for the unions—he has no formal responsibilities within the organization.  What a job!

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 10, 2018  8:44pm

posted by: 1644 on August 10, 2018 2:28pm
3/5’s I didn’t contest observer1, who seems to have a better knowledge of the history than any of us.  As he said, plenty of blame, including the union.  How much gets apportioned to each is debatable.

You said but the unions certainly hastened its departure.Where is the data to Back that up?

posted by: HillNorth on August 11, 2018  12:02am

NH is caught in a very bad position..One, like a bunch of feral cats, the city has fed them (these corrupt unions) and now they are NEVER gonna get rid of them…The lesser of 2 evils is after all, still evil…

posted by: observer1 on August 11, 2018  6:25am

Folks, one last comment, I was there at a very senior level so I saw the corporate politics being played by the big players representing each faction and viewpoint. Every group and subgroup had an agenda. Internal corporate politics was brutal), very senior folks were playing for keeps, with the fate of product lines, the people (both management and union), being pawns in a global chess game. fully one year before the closure was announced, the decision to move from New Haven had been made by Belgium. The show, press releases and drama which followed was pure theatre for public consumption. Each internal faction attempted to get the piece of the pie they coveted for their brand or location. They were negotiating for key people and key gun model specific equipment before the New Haven plant was closed and sold. There were more corporate politics played by the factions vying for the spoils of the closing, than are ever played in Hartford or Washington. The buzzards had divided up and consumed the carcass (which was still producing guns) before the city, the press and the middle to low level salaried workers and union workers knew the body was dead. I could write a book detailing exactly why and how the sequence of events played out from 1960 on to 2006. It is quite a story of people feathering their nest, people jumping ship insiders jockeying for position while planning to maximize severance and unemployment pay. A lot of the comments made by writers contain portions of the truth, based on the perceived reasons behind why things happened during the timeline of the final weeks and months before the closing. The state winked at a lot of environmental issues which should have stopped the new factory from being built. Viability studies by the company screamed not to build in New Haven. State, city and corporate officials all had their own agendas in play to justify keeping Winchester in New Haven. They knew that plant would fail, but it would fail after they got theirs.

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 11, 2018  9:50pm

posted by: observer1 on August 11, 2018 6:25am

They knew that plant would fail, but it would fail after they got theirs.

The same thing happen to Hostess.where the Greedy CEO’S did this.

Remembering Why Twinkies Went Away In The First Place

Twinkies are an American Icon. Thoughts on who to blame for Twinkie’s demise were sharply divided along political lines. Conservatives were quick to blame worker unions. All unions in general and in particular, the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco and Grain Millers International Union, that dared to go on strike against Hostess. How could the workers be so greedy as to strike over something as silly as wages? Why does it matter what you get paid as long as you have a job?One 14-year veteran of the company describes the $150 million annual givebacks the union agreed to: “In 2005, before concessions I made $48,000, last year I made $34,000.” Pensions and healthcare were cut as well, with labor’s total loss equaling $110 million annually.Faced with no pension and yet another pay cut, the workers went on strike. Rather than make good on their promises, The CEOs of Twinkies sacked and looted the company and closed the historic doors of Hostess and selling off the company bit by bit, brand by brand to the highest bidder. But not before first going to court to make sure they wouldn’t have to pay their workers back the pension money.

https://crooksandliars.com/deborah-nesbit/remembering-why-twinkies-went-awa-0

posted by: JCFremont on August 12, 2018  1:42pm

@3/5th’s Ironic we’ve gone from Guns to Twinkies. As I recall about the same time as the Twinkies strike, there was Mayor Bloomberg’s war on Big Gulps and the push for child nutrition, and preventative medicine with the introduction of the ACA (Obama Care). The First Lady was in charge of designing school lunch menu’s. Lunch bags and boxes where monitored possibly inspected. Of course there where Web stories of letters sent home to parents who’s child lunch was not compliant with school’s dietary values. I remember seeing a Facebook posting by a friend proclaiming “We Saved the Twinkies.” I was wondering when did you last eat a Twinkies and would you put it in your kid’s lunch box?

posted by: THREEFIFTHS on August 12, 2018  9:07pm

posted by: JCFremont on August 12, 2018 1:42pm
@3/5th’s Ironic we’ve gone from Guns to Twinkies.

You did not read what I wrote.I was showing How the CEO’S of Hostess sacked and looted the company and closed the historic doors of Hostess and selling off the company bit by bit, brand by brand to the highest bidder. But not before first going to court to make sure they wouldn’t have to pay their workers back the pension money.As far as Putting Twinkies in my children’s Lunch Box.They grow up Vegan .

posted by: JCFremont on August 13, 2018  9:40am

@3/5’s I parsed the question on what is in a child’s lunch box was through a friends Facebook posting, not what you are putting in your children’s lunch box. Anyway, yes I read your link and understand the top executives and top investors take the cream off the top usually because of stock options and a “stake” in the company.  My post was geared more on no matter how “iconic” a corporation or brand maybe it does not protect it from changing business environments and customer choices sometimes “The Brand” can be worth than the company.. Look at governments that continually look to raise vice taxes, and of course the push to legalize marijuana. At the same time they promote anti-smoking campaigns they relay on the tax revenues from the sale of those vices.